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Skiing in CA, are all season tires good enough?

Discussion in 'Model S: Driving Dynamics' started by twonius, Nov 17, 2016.

  1. twonius

    twonius Member

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    Hey,

    Ski season is approaching and I'm getting excited to start visiting Big Bear and Mammoth mountain but I'm a bit worried how the all seasons will perform in snow. Previously I always put on winter tires around the end of October but in San Diego that's not really an option.

    Should I invest in a set of chains or will i be fine?
     
  2. Bet TSLA

    Bet TSLA Member

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    No question you will sometimes need chains. I ski Tahoe, and I did fine with the standard tires and sometimes chains for one season. Then I tried snow tires last season and I was very happy with them. I have a P85 and my car did better with standard tires and chains than most AWD ICE cars. If you have a dual motor car, you'll do even better, but you'll still sometimes need chains.
     
  3. cantdecide

    cantdecide Member

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    Oh, looks like you didn't go for the all wheel drive?
    When it snows they will make you put on chains.
    When it isn't snowing the pavement will be bare.
     
  4. twonius

    twonius Member

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    #4 twonius, Nov 17, 2016
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2016
    Ok Next Question. EV annex is sold out of their (expensive) chains. Any other suggestions?

    I see Tesla still has some in the shop. Any other options or are the Trax pretty much it?
     
  5. PlayaVista

    PlayaVista Member

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    I too look forward to visiting Big Bear and Mammoth once our S and X are delivered. Rather than traditional chains, I am thinking of this: http://www.autosock.us/ It is $100 and CalTrans approved.
     
  6. Bet TSLA

    Bet TSLA Member

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    Looks interesting. One issue I see is that it says not to leave them on while parked for a significant time when they might freeze. So if you park in a parking lot or driveway or street expecting to come back later and still need a traction device, then you may want to take them off and put them back on again later -- that doubles the worst part of the experience.

    I would also ask Tesla, as we're dealing with minimal clearance. These say they're fine for that, but I'd want to hear what Tesla says.
     
  7. kort677

    kort677 Active Member

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    you should be fine on treated roads with the all seasons any sort of accumulation might make things interesting.
     
  8. Boatguy

    Boatguy Member

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    I lived in Lake Tahoe for six years and drove AWD, FWD and RWD vehicles. Everyone one focuses on "going", but the MS is a very heavy car and all the bad stuff happens when you're trying to stop or turn. You can get stuck if you can't go, but you probably won't get into too many accidents. I lived in Alpine Meadows which has a long descending road with a series of turns in a meadow before it reaches the highway and on the first major snow of the year those turns would be littered with cars that slid off the road. And these were full time residents, people who should know better.

    No matter whether you have all season tires, snow tires, studded snow tires or chains it's really important to slow down dramatically compared to dry pavement driving. If you wait until you've lost traction to think about slowing down, it's too late. All vehicles become toboggans at some point and then you're no longer the driver, you're just along for the ride.

    I also suggest turning down the regen if the conditions are difficult. The last thing you want to do in marginal conditions is hit the brakes and the full regen is like hitting the brakes unless you modulate the "go" pedal very carefully. Driving on snow/ice might be time to recall how to gently use the brake pedal.

    To the OP's question, California has levels of chain controls:

    - Chains or snow tires (any tire with M+S on the sidewall)
    - Chains or AWD with snow tires
    - Chain only (you really don't want to be out in these conditions anyway)

    So yeah, buy a set of chains, you never know when the CHP may require them on your RWD MS.
     
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  9. cantdecide

    cantdecide Member

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    We did Mt Rose on the weekend... Up to 8300 feet and back down in plenty of snow. Car performed fine in stock all seasons. Low Regen was sufficient to keep the car at the right speed. Preheating the car was nice (see photos for what difference the preheating made). The remaining ice had a layer of water under it and wiped away easily.

    IMG_20161120_124647.jpg IMG_20161120_144049.jpg
     
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    • Informative x 1

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