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Software updates on 2021 Model 3s?

universe99

New Member
Nov 29, 2020
2
0
Denmark
Hi, I got mine on november 20th, and still on the same software version as you. I also noticed that no matter what i do, supercharging on V3 never goes above 120 kwh. Did you experience the same thing?
Tried with pre-conditioning, batteri at 5% and fairly varm day, alone at the charging station ect. A guy in a model 3 pulled op next til me - his was 2 years old - and he jumped to about 170 kwh right away.
I am hoping it is just an update thats needed.
 

Pemple

Member
Sep 10, 2020
101
159
US
I assumed it came with the latest version when you picked it up new from the store. Seems like it would be easy for them to do...
 

dmurphy

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Dec 7, 2018
3,912
5,534
New Jersey - Morris County
I assumed it came with the latest version when you picked it up new from the store. Seems like it would be easy for them to do...

Not really, and especially not for brand new models (like the Model 3 refresh.)

The firmware is burned in at the factory, weeks or months before it’s delivered to you.

In the case of a not-brand-new model, each individual car gets added to the “eligible for software updates” list after being sold. So within a week or two after bringing it home, it starts getting updates.

But for a new vehicle like the Model 3 refresh ... when they’re introducing something major, like the heat pump, they’ll branch off from the current firmware and build a special version just to support that new feature. Because that firmware has to go to manufacturing so far in advance, it’s usually a month or two behind the current version by the time you see it.

Once the new car is released publicly, they can merge in whatever was “special” about that firmware to the main version, and get all the cars on the same firmware again.

We saw this when the FSD Computer was released; we saw this with Model Y; and we’re seeing it again now with the refreshed Model 3.

Give the software guys a few weeks to get all the firmware changes needed for the refresh back into the “main” release and all will be good.

Net-net: Sounds easy, but it isn’t. Manufacturing and product release concerns make it impractical.
 

Pemple

Member
Sep 10, 2020
101
159
US
Not really, and especially not for brand new models (like the Model 3 refresh.)

The firmware is burned in at the factory, weeks or months before it’s delivered to you.

In the case of a not-brand-new model, each individual car gets added to the “eligible for software updates” list after being sold. So within a week or two after bringing it home, it starts getting updates.

But for a new vehicle like the Model 3 refresh ... when they’re introducing something major, like the heat pump, they’ll branch off from the current firmware and build a special version just to support that new feature. Because that firmware has to go to manufacturing so far in advance, it’s usually a month or two behind the current version by the time you see it.

Once the new car is released publicly, they can merge in whatever was “special” about that firmware to the main version, and get all the cars on the same firmware again.

We saw this when the FSD Computer was released; we saw this with Model Y; and we’re seeing it again now with the refreshed Model 3.

Give the software guys a few weeks to get all the firmware changes needed for the refresh back into the “main” release and all will be good.

Net-net: Sounds easy, but it isn’t. Manufacturing and product release concerns make it impractical.

I'm a computer scientist but I've never worked on hardware tied to a specific hardware configuration (other than machine code) so this was really illuminating and very well explained. Thanks.
 

TTime2021

Member
Nov 5, 2020
34
28
Florida
Not really, and especially not for brand new models (like the Model 3 refresh.)

The firmware is burned in at the factory, weeks or months before it’s delivered to you.

In the case of a not-brand-new model, each individual car gets added to the “eligible for software updates” list after being sold. So within a week or two after bringing it home, it starts getting updates.

But for a new vehicle like the Model 3 refresh ... when they’re introducing something major, like the heat pump, they’ll branch off from the current firmware and build a special version just to support that new feature. Because that firmware has to go to manufacturing so far in advance, it’s usually a month or two behind the current version by the time you see it.

Once the new car is released publicly, they can merge in whatever was “special” about that firmware to the main version, and get all the cars on the same firmware again.

We saw this when the FSD Computer was released; we saw this with Model Y; and we’re seeing it again now with the refreshed Model 3.

Give the software guys a few weeks to get all the firmware changes needed for the refresh back into the “main” release and all will be good.

Net-net: Sounds easy, but it isn’t. Manufacturing and product release concerns make it impractical.

Well done and very informative! Thanks for your insight!
 

Apone

Member
Oct 7, 2020
85
77
Philadelphia Area
Mine was updated before they delivered it to me, they left the "release notes" on the screen. After I left, it did take a few weeks for me to get another even though I knew one was out there. Just hang tight and it will begin. Bit of a black box but it figured it out on its own. It was soon after I connected it to my home wifi, I have wondered if it prioritized wifi since that would reduce download volume over the car connectivity network.
 
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dmurphy

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Dec 7, 2018
3,912
5,534
New Jersey - Morris County
Mine was updated before they delivered it to me, they left the "release notes" on the screen. After I left, it did take a few weeks for me to get another even though I knew one was out there. Just hang tight and it will begin. Bit of a black box but it figured it out on its own. It was soon after I connected it to my home wifi, I have wondered if it prioritized wifi since that would reduce download volume over the car connectivity network.

Yes that's exactly it. Only "urgent" or safety-related firmware updates come in via cellular. The rest wait for WiFi -- whether that's at your home, or alternatively, you can pull into a Tesla service location. The car automatically connects to Tesla's WiFi and will download that way.
 
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