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Solutions for double GFCI

Discussion in 'Roadster' started by Tesla 940, Jan 3, 2012.

  1. Tesla 940

    Tesla 940 Member

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    I know I've seen this somewhere but I can't find it now - so I will ask.

    What is the "preferred" method of dealing with situations where there is are two GFCI protectors - one on the 120v charger connector and one protecting the outlet/circuit?

    I've thought of literally cutting the charger cord and installing a male and female connector. If the wall outlet has its' own GFCI protection I could simply unplug the original male end of the charging cord and then plug the cord into the wall.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. kgb

    kgb Member

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    Probably on this thread

    GFCI Trip on Plug in (spare connector)
     
  3. Tesla 940

    Tesla 940 Member

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    Thanks that was what I was looking for.
     
  4. dhrivnak

    dhrivnak Active Member

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    You could likely convert the garage to non-GFCI circuit. If it is a GFCI Breaker it is quite easy to swap to a non-GFCI breaker. They snap in and out with the GFCI having an extra ground in the box that needs removed as well. Or if it is a GFI outlet just change with a normal outlet. Both options should be less than $20 and take less than 20 minutes.
     
  5. Todd Burch

    Todd Burch Electron Pilot

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    Cutting the charger cord will probably void some warranty.

    I emailed Tesla about this a few days ago (re: the Model S, but the same thing applies): Tesla said to not install a GFCI on the circuit.
     
  6. slcasner

    slcasner Member

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    The simplest and quickest fix (and no messing with live circuits) is to remove the GFCI from the cord and replace it with an industrial grade straight plug, as has been discussed in other threads in this forum.
     
  7. Tesla 940

    Tesla 940 Member

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    Thanks

    Thanks for all the replies. I know about replacing the GFCI outlet or the GFCI circuit breaker routes - I was more looking for solutions if I use someone else's electricity.

    Now I'm thinking of flexible solutions to deal with other outlets - specifically, I have the 14-50 and thinking of carrying a female outlet (in a box) with several feet of 10 guage wire exiting the box. Then carry the various male plugs for 20, 30 amp outlets and a screw driver. It would literally take only a couple minutes to attached the proper male plug to the wire and dial down the amps on the car's screen. It would seem to cost less and take less space in the trunk rather than Tesla's adapters at $100 or $150 each.

    Thoughs?
     
  8. dwegmull

    dwegmull 2013 Model S 85

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    Just remember to manually limit the current using the touch screen before starting the charge... The TM adapters have the advantage of selecting the maximum current automatically based on the plug type.
     
  9. W.Petefish

    W.Petefish Active Member

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    Maybe you need to make an adaptor box with current selector on it since all of the reverse engineering has been done.
     

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