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Sound Deadening - Early Cars vs. Current

Discussion in 'Model S: Interior & Exterior' started by cab, Jul 13, 2016.

  1. cab

    cab Member

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    So I am shopping for CPO cars and one of the recurring themes I hear (no pun intended) revolves around the improved sound deadening of later cars (i.e. they are quieter). Assuming that is true, does anyone have any experience with regard to exactly what that sound deadening might be?

    Ideally, I would consider "mimicking" what Tesla did in terms of the later "factory" sound deadening (as they would have done the hard work of identifying the noisiest locations). Typically this involves a combination of mass loaded vinyl, butly rubber deadening sheets and "plugging holes". Obviously, if they used something more involved like thicker glass, more welds/metal, that's not going to be replicated by me.

    As a side note "quieter tires" has typically been the biggest improvement in noise reduction I've seen over the years (i.e. better to STOP the noise than try to "block it" after-the-fact).

    Thanks!
     
  2. Boourns

    Boourns Member

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    Not exactly an answer to your question, but I can say that my early VIN Model S is by far the quietest car I have ever owned, including late-model near-luxury cars (G37 and my wife's 2015 Volvo XC60). My guess is that unless you are coming from a new S Class Merc or the equivalent you will be happy without any additional sound deadening.
     
  3. cab

    cab Member

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    Boourns - well, that does help at least somewhat since my wife has a 2012 XC60 RD so at least we have a common point of reference AND may drive on some similar roads here in the DFW area! The wind noise appears to be the kicker on the XC60 (at speeds above 65 or so anyway).
     
  4. Tdriver

    Tdriver Member

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    From what I have seen on the forum, insulation was added to the interior of the wheel wells and motor area. I noticed an improvement when I added custom carpets over the existing ones throughout the cabin.
     
  5. cab

    cab Member

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    Wheel wells and motor area would make sense given the floor is loaded with batteries that likely act as a huge sound barrier in that area.
     
  6. ahimberg

    ahimberg Member

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    For me wind noise from the modelS having frameless doors is by far the most distracting noise at higher speeds, though it probably varies wildly by car since its dependent on how good the seals and your window aligns with the body when closed.

    I was hoping for more improvement between my 2013 S and 2015S, not much for me -- if it matters a lot to you choice of tires is going to make a big difference to. (I have had 19s in both, loaners with 21s are definitely louder)
     
  7. Camera-Cruiser

    Camera-Cruiser Fully Charged

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    There are posts here (so search about) from members who took out just about everything from their interiors and did variations of mass loaded vinyl and other accoustic treatment to get pretty good results, but tires are a huge factor from what I have read. There is also a thread about carbon fiber rims (pricey), and how they may also lessen noise, while improving performance.

    My 2013 CPO was noisy at first, but after about 5 trips to service to replace seals, make hatch adjustments, and replace brake booster pump twice, it's gotten pretty quite. Highway above 50 still gets loud enough to bother me while making calls though, but that is SoCals use of grooved concrete instead of asphalt. There are a couple stretches of new asphalt near my home that are earily silent.
     
  8. ArtInCT

    ArtInCT Always Learning

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    When I did a test drive of an early P85D, the db reading from my db Pro was 41 at rest (all HVAC off) and 57 rolling on good pavement on 21's at 60 MPH. Yesterday I did another test on my February 2016 build P90D. Still 41 at rest but only 51 rolling on 19's at 60 MPH. The tires on the P90D are Bridgestone Potenza Pole Position S04 which are quiet, sticky and very efficient summer tires.

    Tesla have made some serious strides in noise abatement, especially the reduction of wind noise. BTW I have found that the condition of the pavement is very critical to road noise. Pavement which has lost the fines between the larger aggregate due to erosion, is much louder.

    I also agree with Ahimberg, the 21's appear to be louder, but I have not driven on the Conti Silents in that size.
     
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  9. cab

    cab Member

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    The comments around tires mirror my own experience. In general, if you have $800 to spend, you are better off dropping that on quieter tires than sound deadening IF the tires you currently have are noisier than average. I peruse the tire rack reviews carefully for noise comments for this very reason. The Contisilents would appear to be the best option (at the expense of all out performance) offering for the Tesla's with 21s...pricey though.

    Finally, as others have stated, the roads YOU drive on make all the difference in the world. Grooved concrete is the worst and fleshly laid smooth blacktop is the best. Google "quiet asphalt" to read up on the rubberized asphalts that are so nice and quiet.
     
  10. Krypto Kat

    Krypto Kat Member

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    The active noise cancellation is gaining traction. My Acura TLX is eerily quiet on the highway. GMC truck and Merc's new E also do active noise cancelling now. Electronic tech is taking over Mechanical Tech.
     
  11. UberEV1

    UberEV1 Member

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    Check out @artsci 's detailed report HERE . . . very thorough study on sound deadening. In fact, if you want to learn a lot about improving the Model S, he has documented more after market "experiments" than probably any other Model S owner. Cool stuff!
     
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  12. ArtInCT

    ArtInCT Always Learning

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    BTW, while doing my db noise tests, here is an observation which I must share with you all. The noise of other vehicles next to you or ahead of you or coming at you in an adjacent lanes cannot be overlooked at all. When I was all alone on the roadway, the car was noticeably more quiet than when I was along side other traffic. Especially those cars with loud exhausts (as are common among the younger crowd who run large can mufflers). I am not sure what could be done to mitigate the sound of other traffic other than noise cancelling technology.
     
  13. Camera-Cruiser

    Camera-Cruiser Fully Charged

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    Yup that is what I was thinking about. Great read.
     
  14. JPP

    JPP Active Member

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    FWIW, new S with 19's come with a new Goodyear Eagle Touring tire with internal sound deadening foam. I have not seen any official reviews (like on Tire Rack) or full comparisons on TMC, but it is interesting that TM did work with Goodyear on this (if you go to Tire Rack there is a TM specific tire).
     

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