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Southern cali SCE customers, how much did your bill increase

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by broncophil, Nov 8, 2014.

  1. broncophil

    broncophil Member

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2014
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    Location:
    Cali
    Like many, I'm trying to justify the cost of the MS.

    How much did your bill go up from your monthly. If you don't mind, how many miles did you drive.

    I do about $300 month during got months, but the rest I'm at about $150.

    Thanks
     
  2. capt601

    capt601 Vin02324

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    Feb 22, 2011
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    Location:
    Mission Viejo, California, United States
    1000-1500 miles per month. And $50-70 a month increase.
    You'll do most of your charging after midnight when the rates are 11¢.
    And make sure you get on correct plan.
     
  3. broncophil

    broncophil Member

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    Location:
    Cali
    Whoa thats great. I'm currently spending $60 a week in gas, and I'm driving a hybrid @ 1000 miles a month
     
  4. ecarfan

    ecarfan Well-Known Member

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    San Mateo, CA
    I think it is typical to find that to "fill the tank" of an EV you will spend approximately a quarter of the amount you spent on gas. The actual savings will of course vary depending on your cost of electricity and the efficiency of the EV. But that is what I found for my Model S.
     
  5. liuping

    liuping Active Member

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    Don't forget about adding Solar. It can lower the price of electricity quite a bit, depending on your plan. Last year we averaged 1.35 cents per kWh (including all taxes,etc) for the extra 5595 kWh's we used for charge the Tesla and Volt.
     
  6. Majerus

    Majerus Member

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    Illinois
    Dont forget the installation costs of the 14-50 as well, which can be 750+ .
     
  7. Perfect_Flaw

    Perfect_Flaw Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2014
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    Location:
    US
    I have SCE and am on their Time of Use EV plan. My Super-Off Peak times are Midnight-6am (when I charge the car) which is $0.09/kw during summer and $0.10/kw during Winter. I also have Solar and generate during On-Peak times and get credits ($0.31-0.49/kw) so this offsets a lot of my Off and Super-Off Peak usage.

    I estimate I pay around $38-39 per month to drive 1,500 miles (assuming $0.09/kw charging) and that is not factoring in credits earned from generating during peak hours... solar is the key, because I probably over-generate on an average month about $65-90 per month of electricity credits. With my solar lease payment + monthly household electricity cost + extra cost of charging the Tesla I pay about $2500 less per year than what I paid annually for gas ALONE. I love it.
     
  8. laalan

    laalan Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2012
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    Location:
    Orange, CA
    I had SCE put in a second meter and at $.11 9pm to noon my bill is $60 for 1500 mile months with spirited driving. Second Meter was $800 and has paid for itself.
     
  9. Ed Chan

    Ed Chan Member

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    Jun 19, 2014
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    Location:
    Palos Verdes, CA
    #9 Ed Chan, Nov 15, 2014
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2014
    I drove about 1700 home-charged miles last month and my bill went up by about $100 from last year... I switched from normal rate plan to TOU-D-TEV before getting the car... We are peak users every monday so I think our peak usage influenced the bill. No A/C, old house, solar unfeasible due to substandard electrical buildout in the neighborhood. Still, $100 for 1700 miles is pretty darn good. In a 20 MPG car, it would have cost $255 at $3/gallon.
     
  10. jstepy

    jstepy Member

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    Location:
    Orange County CA
    I too have Time of Use EV Rate with SCE which is a complete no brainer for those with solar. BUY CHEAP SELL HIGH! We don't only take advantage of that Super Off-Peak rate for the Tesla but we run the pool filter, time delay the dishwasher as well as a delayed wash that can be put in the dryer first thing in the morning. In the summer time we even ran the AC like crazy from 12 am to 6 am and would have the house super cold in the morning that would easily keep the house cool throughout the day.

    I know some people that own solar that have called SCE and told them they have a leaf or Fiat E etc. just to get on the Time of Use EV rate. Normal Time of Use gets you On-Peak from 12 PM to 6 PM but with TOU - EV you get On-Peak from 10 am to 6 pm. It's great to get those two extra hours producing credits at the higher rate.

    If you don't have Solar and Time of Use is not an option for your lifestyle (too many people home during the day etc.) then I would definitely recommend the separate meter like laalan did to get those cheaper fixed EV charging rates.

    All this to say that I have calculated about a cost of 3.3 cents per mile in my Model S vs. 20 cents per mile in my F-250 Super Duty... but again this is not taking into account my solar which is a little above and beyond my math skills as a geologist... sorry.

    If you can get on TOU or a separate meter just estimate the kWh's you would use to charge and multiply by .09, .10 or .11 and you'd have a pretty good estimate. 85 kWh's would cost me $8.50 right now and yes I know it's not just a straight 1:1 ratio coming from SCE meter to the Tesla but for estimation I think it's close enough.
     
  11. liuping

    liuping Active Member

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    #11 liuping, Nov 18, 2014
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2014
    Separate meter can be pretty expensive to install, usually $2000-$3000.

    There is a California pilot program to use specially modified/approved EVSEs to act as a separate power meter for billing purposes (the amount used from the EVSE is subtracted from your whole house usage and billed at the EV TOU rates). There is som einfo on signing up for the EVSE here: Electric Motor Werks, Inc. - Electric Motor Werks, Inc..

    I signed up for the mostly free EVSE through Ohmconnect.com, which in addition to administering this EVSE metering pilot program, is a site that sends out alerts when the power company has to start using peaker plants that cause more pollution. It's pretty easy to just put off cooking dinner for a bit, not tuning on the washing machine, etc until the hour is up. I like the idea of empowering people to change their behavior slightly to reduce pollution. Plus they reward you with points for each time you reduce your usage during an alert, which can be cashed in for actual money later. You can sign up directly at Ohmconnect, or use my referral link (Invited | Ohmconnect), which gives both of us a 500 points.
     
  12. swaltner

    swaltner Member

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    Kansas, USA
    @liuping, That sounds like a great program with the EVSE doing separate billing and alerts going out that "request" demand reduction. While some people won't respond and there may be times that you can't respond, information is power and that's the first step in being able to change your behavior.

    Here in Kansas, my electric company has a program where they'll install a free programmable thermostat that gives the power company remote access to cycle your air-conditioner at peak times. This program only benefits the local power company with the consumer getting the marginal benefit of a free programmable thermostat, which is normally worth something like $25. For that $25, you give up direct control of your thermostat. They even go so far as only allowing you to override their cycling program a small percentage of the time. Give the consumer some benefit like your power company is doing (example for us would be a lower electricity rate any time they jump in and take control of your thermostat) and consumers would jump all over the program. Your power company is doing the Right Thing™.
     
  13. Blu Zap

    Blu Zap Grinning member

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    Location:
    San Rafael, CA
    I'm in NorCal on PG&E, so cannot respond to the question directly. But I can say PG&E does have two plans for EV charging. I opted for the single meter plan. It is around .095/kWh after 11:00 pm. The dual meter plan had a pretty high entry fee for that second meter.
     

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