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Soyuz mission failure 2 minutes after launch to ISS

Discussion in 'SpaceX' started by ecarfan, Oct 11, 2018.

  1. ecarfan

    ecarfan Well-Known Member

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    Soyuz crew lands safely after emergency launch abort – Spaceflight Now

    Crew is safe. During ascent, a few seconds after the 4 side boosters shut down and separated (and after the emergency escape tower was jettisoned, as is standard procedure I think) there was a “booster failure”, the crew then reported being “weightless” so the capsule was no longer attached to the booster (I assume) and the capsule descended to earth and landed about 250 miles from Baikonur.

    It was interesting to listen to the NASA announcer during the flight; after the Russian audio feed could be heard saying “booster failure” she made one routine statement about the speed of the vehicle and then stopped talking.

    I have not found any additional details about the mission failure.
     
  2. Nikxice

    Nikxice Member

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    If that Soyuz booster didn't just disintegrate, it was surely shedding pieces. Perhaps an extra challenge, the abort apparently occurred just after the escape tower was jettisoned. Good for the Russians that they have a proven abort system. Of course Boeing will soon show NASA that this can all be demonstrated with only a pad abort test.

    Quite an experience for American astronaut Nick Hague's first ride on a rocket. Wonder what NASA's options are. A 70 million dollar refund or perhaps a future flight credit.
     
  3. Grendal

    Grendal SpaceX Moderator

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    Post incident NASA meeting:


    Scott Manley chimes in with good information.
     
  4. ecarfan

    ecarfan Well-Known Member

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    #4 ecarfan, Oct 11, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2018
    I would not assume that was the case. Perhaps the second stage engine simply failed to light. We don’t know.

    EDIT: Sorry! See my post below.
     
  5. ecarfan

    ecarfan Well-Known Member

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    New article from Eric Berger, a good source: On Thursday a rocket failed. Three humans remain on the ISS. What’s next?

    QUOTE:

    “What happened to the rocket?

    No one is saying for sure, although a Russian investigation has already begun. What we know is that at about two minutes, there was some sort of failure with the first stage of the rocket and/or its strap-on boosters. (Rumors are circulating that perhaps one or two of the boosters didn't properly separate from the first stage).”
    —————————————————————

    So the problem wasn’t the second stage, it was some component of the first stage.

    @Nikxice my apologies: when you wrote “Soyuz booster” I misinterpreted that to mean second stage. My error.
     
  6. ecarfan

    ecarfan Well-Known Member

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    So here’s an interesting scenario to handle the situation. From the Eric Berger article, quote:

    “Three astronauts—American Anne McClain, Canadian David Saint-Jacques, and Russian Oleg Kononenko—were scheduled to launch to the station in mid-December aboard a Soyuz vehicle. If the Russians and NASA aren't fully confident in that launch vehicle, a Soyuz spacecraft could possibly be launched empty to the station and replace the existing Soyuz as a lifeboat for the three astronauts on orbit. This would give the on-orbit crew another 200 days.”
    —————————————————————————
     
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  7. e-FTW

    e-FTW New electron smell

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    At 1:10 in that video, you can see the motions the astronauts were subjected to at the moment things seemed to go south. Look at how their legs are getting trashed around.
    Disclaimer: I've not compared that phase of flight to other Soyouz launches.
     
  8. Nikxice

    Nikxice Member

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    This article presents more detail than most of the other online publications reporting on the Soyuz MS-10 abort, including some convincing speculation as to what caused the failure.
    Soyuz MS-10 makes emergency landing after a launch failure

    Key paragraph, "A few hours after the accident, RIA Novosti quoted industry sources as saying that telemetry analysis had pointed toward a possible pyrotechnics separation problem between the first and second stage. According to industry sources quoted on the Novosti Kosmonavtiki web forum, the pressurization valve on one of the strap-on boosters of the first stage failed to open as scheduled to push it away from the second stage during separation and it led to the collision of the empty booster with the firing second stage and damaging or pushing it off course. According to Interfax, the impact of the first-stage booster caused the rupture of a (propellant tank) on the second stage and the loss of attitude control (of the entire vehicle)."

    The numerical designations of the Soyuz boosters can even confuse a noted Space journalist like Eric Berger. He refers to the core stage as the first stage. Actually the four side boosters are considered the first stage. Those four side boosters surround the core booster, which is alternatively known as the second stage even though it ignites on the launch pad.
     
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  9. Electroman

    Electroman Active Member

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    Wow.. what a complicated design compared to Falcon 9.
     
  10. Grendal

    Grendal SpaceX Moderator

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    This is the same scenario that Scott Manley thought could happen. Taking this as an example, I speculated that they could also do the same thing with DM-1. The idea is that there must be an escape capsule present. DM-1 could achieve that as well as a Soyuz capsule if the Soyuz is unavailable.
     
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  11. e-FTW

    e-FTW New electron smell

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    That could explain what you see in that onboard video (apparent oscillations of the whole thing).
     
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  12. e-FTW

    e-FTW New electron smell

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    Maybe, but it's been working pretty well for a very long time. Am amazed myself, as “Made in Russia” is often derided as a mark of older designs that don’t work too well. Not so in this case.
     
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  13. bxr140

    bxr140 Active Member

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    It pretty much launched the first human into space, so...
     
  14. Grendal

    Grendal SpaceX Moderator

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    Scott Manley chimes in for a second time and gives a plausible reason for the failure.
     
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  15. e-FTW

    e-FTW New electron smell

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    Confirmed:
    NASA astronaut unfazed by frightening launch abort – Spaceflight Now

    You have to feel for Hague:
     
  16. SMAlset

    SMAlset Active Member

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    I thought this video of the launch and subsequent coverage as it was being tracked (along with graphics and various control rooms) was interesting to see. Especially in contrast to the coverage we get with SpaceX launches and camera view, etc.



    Very glad we had a happy ending despite the mission failure.
     
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  17. Grendal

    Grendal SpaceX Moderator

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    That video is interesting to show the NASA spokesperson was reading from a script. In another video, she went on for two or three minutes until finally mentioning the booster failure we eventually hear her mention here. The graphics are completely wrong and showing a normal launch. The translator is fantastic, repeating what the astronauts are saying. The control room shots are great. Everyone seems so calm, cool, and collected in the face of an emergency.
     
  18. SMAlset

    SMAlset Active Member

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    Glad you saw I added it Grendal! When a thread starts to get old, not sure how many bother to click on it and I really thought it was a very interesting perspective into coverage from Russia. At some parts I felt like I was watching something from the 50s. Made me realize all the more how much I love SpaceX's video coverage, camera angles and pre-launch coverage too.
     
  19. Grendal

    Grendal SpaceX Moderator

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    The Russian investigation is pretty much confirming what Scott Manley predicted happened in the second video. They think one of the pyros failed to ignite properly and that caused the solid booster to not jettison properly causing it to strike and severely damage the stage one booster. Now they are investigating why the pyro didn't ignite properly.
     
  20. ecarfan

    ecarfan Well-Known Member

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    Fortunately SpaceX doesn’t use pyros to separate stages or payloads. Wise decision.
     
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