TMC is an independent, primarily volunteer organization that relies on ad revenue to cover its operating costs. Please consider whitelisting TMC on your ad blocker or making a Paypal contribution here: paypal.me/SupportTMC

Spare tire solution

Discussion in 'Model S: Interior & Exterior' started by Dborn, May 13, 2014.

  1. Dborn

    Dborn Confirmed

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2011
    Messages:
    2,071
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    Without adding much expense, Tesla could provide a hard point say on the sidewall of the trunk with a thumbscrew and plate. Then, it becomes a proposition for the owner to supply the spare wheel in the knowledge that it can be safely transported and will not be a missile hazard in the vehicle. While a wheel can fit in the frunk, it is my understanding that Tesla do NOT approve of that practice, probably because it has not been safety tested.
    So supply your own wheel and cover and bolt to the side of the trunk to suit yourself.
     
  2. Patrick W

    Patrick W Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2015
    Messages:
    829
    Location:
    SLC, UT
    I was told the same thing just yesterday. They said they've not tested front end crashes with a spare in the frunk. Said if a spare it to be carried it should be carried in the rear trunk.
     
  3. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2012
    Messages:
    12,743
    Location:
    Texas
    I wouldn't carry it in the frunk anyway because that's where my clothes are when traveling.
     
  4. kepstein

    kepstein New Member

    Joined:
    May 30, 2015
    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Sammamsh, WA
    I am looking for a spare tire to carry when on a road trip. I'm content to use Roadside Assistance when in the metropolitan areas, but I'm worried about getting caught with a flat in the middle of nowhere when on a road trip. My plan is to have an inflated tire on a compatible rim in a zippered tire bag in the back so that it can be swapped with the flat if needed. I'm not planning to do the swap myself, so not worried about having a jack or cracking the nuts myself. I will figure out how to secure it so that it doesn't become a projectile in a crash.

    I have stock rims with Michelin Primacy MXM4 245/45R19 98W. I have Air Suspension if that matters. Since it will be a spare, it doesn't have to be a perfect match to the other tires, although I don't want driving on the spare to do any damage either.
    Any/all recommendations welcome.

    Keith
    MS70D Loaded (VIN 90980)
     
  5. jaguar36

    jaguar36 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2014
    Messages:
    859
    Location:
    NJ
    If you're worried about getting a flat in the middle of nowhere, you should probably get a full-size wheel/tire. Donut spares are only good for a few miles (usually less than 100), particularly on a heavy car like the S.

    Therefore you can just get another Tesla wheel so it matches, or just get whatever is cheapest at Tire Rack.
     
  6. Father Bill

    Father Bill Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2015
    Messages:
    171
    Location:
    Brighton, IL
    that's strange because when I got my spare the frunk is where they put it. Keep an eye out here and on eBay. You can often find a deal on a single OEM wheel here or there.
     
  7. JST

    JST Active Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2013
    Messages:
    1,506
    If you are going to go to the trouble to carry a spare, you might as well carry a jack and a lug wrench so you can change the tire out without waiting for roadside assistance (or if you are out of cell range...). Jacks and lug wrenches are not expensive and can tuck in to the wheel and not take up extra space.

    I'd also just get a used Tesla wheel and tire that matches the rest of your set, if you are going the full-size route. Might as well. The extra cost is not that extreme, particularly if you can find a used one.

    For your use case, though, I might just go with the compact spare. Since you've got a D, the full size tire is going to take up a fair amount of trunk room. The compact will be usefully narrower and give you back some of that space for luggage.
     
  8. teslasguy

    teslasguy MSP P#1117

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2012
    Messages:
    672
    Location:
    West Chester, Pa
    I always carry a spare OEM Tesla 19" wheel/tire in my trunk. I also have another spare if anyone in the Philadelphia area wants it. $250.
     
  9. teslasguy

    teslasguy MSP P#1117

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2012
    Messages:
    672
    Location:
    West Chester, Pa
    #9 teslasguy, Aug 17, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2015
    I meant to say "in my frunk"
     
  10. JST

    JST Active Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2013
    Messages:
    1,506
    That works well for the RWD cars but won't work for the Ds, because the frunk is too small.

    Autocorrect does not like "frunk."
     
  11. mknox

    mknox Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2012
    Messages:
    8,549
    Location:
    Toronto, ON
    I might consider just throwing one of my winter tires already mounted on a Tesla rim (or a summer tire in the winter) in the frunk if I go on a long road trip. I wouldn't change it myself, but Roadside could rather than having to flatbed me off somewhere unfamiliar.
     
  12. CaryS

    CaryS Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2014
    Messages:
    18
    Location:
    Bryn Mawr, PA
    I was thinking of doing the same. Obviously, the tires would be mismatched, so my question is how long could you travel before problems arise?
     
  13. mknox

    mknox Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2012
    Messages:
    8,549
    Location:
    Toronto, ON
    They would be the exact same size, but yes, mismatched. My intent wouldn't be to finish the trip on it, but let me get to a tire shop of my choosing as soon as I could. On a trip, I could see losing a day to waiting for a flatbed, hauling it off to get fixed and so on. With a spare, I could potentially travel to my destination, or end the day of a multi-day trip and try and find a tire shop in the evening some time. Maybe call ahead while on the way. My only issue is that my winter tires are "directional" so if the flat was on the "wrong" side of the car, there may have to be some juggling of existing tires first.

    Is this any worse that any other car with a full-size spare that you need to use in the winter? You'd end up with 3 winters and the spare, which is typically a match for the car's summer or all-season tires.
     
  14. caddieo

    caddieo Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2013
    Messages:
    877
    Location:
    Palm Coast, FL
    There is a thread on making a donut spare started by member JST which is quite detailed. I suppose you could look it up in a list of his postings. It fits nicely in the frunk of non-D models.
     
  15. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2012
    Messages:
    12,743
    Location:
    Texas
    This is a real "it depends" question. On a non-driving axle, with the same tire size, practically forever (although handling would suffer). On a drive axle, it depends on the difference in the RPMs of the tires.
     
  16. freeewilly

    freeewilly Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2015
    Messages:
    387
    Location:
    Brea, CA
    I know a lot of people hates run flat tires, but it's the easiest way to increase safety, and without carrying a spare tire.
    I also see a huge price drop compare how much it used to cost few years ago.
     
  17. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2012
    Messages:
    12,743
    Location:
    Texas
    1. There is also a huge drop in range.

    2. Runflat tires can't be runflat for very long. Thirty miles if I recall correctly.

    3. They are not repairable.

    4. I question the safety aspects. When tires had large sidewalls, they would really alter the vehicle attitude when flat and it was easy to lose control. Now that many tires' sidewall height approach zero, the car's attitude doesn't change much. It's still possible to lose control, but it's a much rarer occurrence.

    5. Ride and handling are not the best.
     
  18. jaguar36

    jaguar36 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2014
    Messages:
    859
    Location:
    NJ
    Not so:

    1. There shouldn't be a significant drop in Tesla range on run-flats, there isn't a noticeable difference in fuel economy on an ICE using run-flats.

    2. Run-flat range is dependent on load, and is very similar to a donut's range.

    3. They can be repaired just fine if they weren't run at 0 psi.

    4. I think you are much safer driving a runflat than trying to change a tire on the side of a busy highway.

    5. True dat.

    Something else to keep in mind is that because of their stiffer sidewall, you're wheels take more of the abuse from pot holes and such. With 21" you'd be cracking wheels left and right if you live in an area with poor roads. Even with the 19" it wouldn't surprise me if you broke a few wheels with RFTs.
     
  19. mknox

    mknox Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2012
    Messages:
    8,549
    Location:
    Toronto, ON
    When I did some research a while back, it appeared that run flats didn't have as low rolling resistance as other tires. I couldn't find any that had low or ultra low rolling resistance ratings such as the Michelin MXM4 tires that Tesla now installs as standard equipment.


    I would agree with that.
     
  20. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2012
    Messages:
    12,743
    Location:
    Texas
    I had an evaluation set of runflats on my S85 and they increased th Wh/mi by 30 to 60 on my regular commute. 15% to 25%. The reason ICE cars seem less is that ICE drivers don't keep records.
     

Share This Page