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Spare tire?

Discussion in 'Model 3: Interior & Exterior' started by marklazo, Jun 19, 2018.

  1. marklazo

    marklazo New Member

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    Hi Everyone! I'm looking for a piece of Aero wheel for my model 3 and use it as a spare, anyone selling a piece of it? also found this spare kit online, would this be a great option? [​IMG]
     
    • Helpful x 1
  2. Don85D

    Don85D Member

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    For long distance road trips I purchased a single rim from Tesla to match the rims on our Model S. I bought a matching tire too and the necessary tools can be sourced easily including hockey puck for a buck. My reasoning is that having a replacement rim and tire is a perfect spare for continuing a long distance road trip without further interruption. The spare easily fits in the trunk or behind the driver's seat and it can be used for storage of small items. Best of all it's nice to have a replacement should a rim become bent or destroyed by a pothole. Finding good original rims for older unique vehicles is not always easy.

    I make this spare available to other Model S owners on our street for their trips along with a CHAdeMO adapter. It seems like a nice thing to share.
     
    • Like x 2
  3. docherf

    docherf Member

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    Wow that is a great looking spare kit. That'd be nice to travel with.
     
  4. JPUConn

    JPUConn Active Member

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    Isn’t the bmw space saver compatible with Tesla bolt patterns/size?
     
  5. E-Ryc

    E-Ryc Member

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    Just for curiosity, do you have pressure sensor on your spare? Or does it work w/o one? I somehow recall someone mentioned it's showstopper when sensors are not detected (may be US only issue, though). Thanks
     
  6. docbrown

    docbrown Member

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    I've been researching spare tires for a while now, and I've never heard that a TPMS is required. That would be a pretty big design flaw, and safety issue, if the vehicle would not run when it could not detect a sensor.
     
  7. steve841

    steve841 Active Member

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    Personally, I keep a complete spare wheel in the garage and a repair kit in the car with a pump.

    I have an extra complete spare if anyone is in the market ... Silver 21"
     
  8. E-Ryc

    E-Ryc Member

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    #8 E-Ryc, Jun 20, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2018
    @docbrown : My fault, I've found the original one, he mentions warning if sensor doesn't work, showstoper if receiver doesn't work:
    TPMS and Wheel Installation Questions

    Regarding safety - could be like with keyless entry in ICE cars - it starts when key is nearby but doesn't stop if key disapears while driving.
     
  9. docbrown

    docbrown Member

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    By safety I meant having the car leaving you stranded somewhere just because of a faulty tire sensor.
     
  10. Yaro

    Yaro Member

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    You can drive without a TPMS sensor. You can even drive without a wheel, don't ask me how I know.
     
    • Funny x 1
  11. Don85D

    Don85D Member

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    A local tire shop that I use discourages tire pressure sensors in snow tires. They are prone to corrosion and need to be cut off when the valve core or cap cannot be removed. People put fancy metal caps on the metal stems and they corrode solid. Sensors also have a 10 year battery life so another cost factor for tires that are only used a couple of months each year. I consider a spare wheel to be no different. Simple is better except that the error indicator is always 'on' when using the spare.

    For our pickup truck with high centre of gravity low tire pressure/failure can result in roll over so I have pressure sensors in both sets of wheels. My last truck didn't have TPMS and our BMW used the ABS ring to calculate when a tire has lost pressure. Both of those systems worked well enough for me so I'm not a fan of tire pressure sensors in each wheel.
     
  12. Zaphod

    Zaphod Galaxy President (former)

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    Not for Model 3, it has different pattern than the S/X. S/X are 5x120 while the 3 is 5x114.3.
     
  13. JPUConn

    JPUConn Active Member

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    Ahh missed the Model 3 part as this was in the Model S forum.
     
  14. SouthBayGuy

    SouthBayGuy Member

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    I don't think I would feel safe using that scissor jack with such a small contact area, particularly if I also need something like a slippery hockey puck or custom jack pad between the jack to prevent possibly damaging the battery shell. I would prefer to use a small hydraulic jack instead. My local Harbor Freight sells aluminum ones for about $60 on sale.

    As for the wheel and tire itself, I personally would have purchased a "closeout" wheel from Tire Rack and buy a used tire from my local used tire store. I saw a wheel on sale for $99 today.

    For long trips, I would bring my electric drill with an attachment for the lug nuts so I can get the take them off and put them on as quick as possible. It only costs a few bucks for that adapter for your electric drill/screwdriver to be able to work on sockets for the lug nuts. I would still need a torque wrench to tighten the bolts to the proper specs.

    With all that said, I actually just opted to buy a flat tire repair kit and electric air pump for tires in hopes that I never get into a situation where my tire suddenly gets obliterated and I just need to plug the tire until I can get to the nearest tire repair shop. Perhaps in the years to come when there are tons of Model 3's on the road, I will be able to find a used wheel and tire for a bargain. Then I would probably get a spare tire.
     
  15. Don85D

    Don85D Member

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    Plugging a tire is best as the repair kit with sealant is really of limited use. It may seal the puncture and refill the tire partially but you can't travel at any speed as the balance will be way off and constantly changing as the sealant settles, spreads then settles again.

    I tried a roadside sealant repair last winter and it cost me much more to fix the balance problem later.

    I still carry a can of sealant but it's for my wife to use in an emergency. I also carry a plug kit and some sheet metal screws which would be my first choice if the spare wheel was not in the car. Sheet metal screws are effective if you can find the puncture point as they will bite into the steel casing and seal well enough to get home. This is standard kit on our motorcycle where a spare tire is not possible and special tools required to remove a wheel. CO2 cylinders can fill a tire or a small 12VDC compressor given enough time.

    There are probably lots of other opinions but until you have repaired a tire the theory seems easy. I was once advised to visit a scrap yard and ask for a wheel and tire (free usually) then take it home and practise plugging it or using a sheet metal screw. Refill and test the next morning. A battery powered drill in the car makes sense but not so much for wheel nut removal but to open the hole where the puncture occurred. A drill bit is required to open the steel mesh so that the plug tool can be inserted and extracted leaving behind the plug and glue. Otherwise you need to use a round file that comes with the plug kit.

    One more thing... the glue in plug kits dries out so buy some fresh every year and sealant stored in the trunk in winter will not flow into a tire via the valve. It's too thick which also causes the balance issue.

    For anyone who want to remove a tire from a rim try an hydraulic jack placed under the bumper/frame of a car. The weight of the car will release the tire bead from the rim. If you have a scrap wheel and tire you might as well practise.

    Most roadside repairs fail because the wheel is corroded onto the hub or the wheel nuts are swollen with rust. You will need some serious (big) tools to get the wheel free so that the spare can be used. Changing to winter tires and back again in Spring to summer tires is good to deal with corrosion before it becomes a bigger problem.

    One final comment...don't assume that the tire shop did a good job installing your wheels. I have seen one wheel nut out of 5 torqued very high and impossible to remove with normal tools. That would prevent a roadside repair so checking to ensure all wheel nuts are at spec is wise.
     
    • Informative x 1
  16. BobChaput

    BobChaput Member

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    Thanks for the good tips. I had a "spare" for my 2012 Prius. The Prius had a couple of tie down D rings which could be used with a nylon strap. I'm concerned with a loose 50 lb projectile in case of a front end collision.
     
  17. Don85D

    Don85D Member

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    When we carry our spare wheel on road trips it is usually just my wife and myself in the vehicle which leaves the foot space behind the driver's seat open and secure enough for the wheel. If it is still a concern, webbing could be passed under the seat frame to tie down the wheel. In that position the tire is easy to remove from the car and with a protective black bag it looks neat too.

    When we need space for 4 people in the car the spare can stay in the trunk and I don't worry about it flying during a short run to a restaurant at city speeds.

    I understand your concern and mainly I worry about people placing loose items on the rear window shelf which can become deadly.
     
  18. BobChaput

    BobChaput Member

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    Incidentally, your tip re sheet metal screws is great. Simple and probably very effective. Do you coat the screws with anything? I carry a self contained tire compressure pump. The screws and the pump should take me a long way.
     
  19. Don85D

    Don85D Member

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    No coating on the screws required. They need to be big enough for the puncture hole size so I carry a few sizes. A small compressor or CO2 kit will re-inflate the tire and you can run it this way for a long distance even if a slow leak requires top up. A pair of pliers to remove the nail or steel that caused the puncture is a good item to carry along.

    The screw also marks the location where a plug/patch will be required once you reach a destination where the tire can be repaired.

    I have had slow leaks in tires in the past only to discover a screw imbedded in the tread with the screw head worn flat. That road debris screw was there for a long time.
     
  20. Candleflame

    Candleflame Member

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    Location:
    QLD, Australia
    i once had a complete blowout 800km away from home and 400km away from the nearest reasonable civilization and was incredibly f****** grateful for that fullsize spare tire in the booth.

    Very interested in an emergency kit like this, even if it only allows travel at i.e. 50mph.
     

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