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SR+ impressions after the first 3000kms

CE9F5678-CB40-490D-8D7B-1C6E0EBF3556.jpeg


It’s now been two months and I’ve travelled 3000kms in my SR+, and I thought I would try to capture some of my thoughts and experience with the car.

The transition to the Tesla way of doing things has been easier than I had imagined, interestingly the multifunction stalks required more thought and practice than the single screen interface. There is a lot of thought and engineering that has gone into the user experience that contributes to the delight of driving the car and that helps you overlook the flaws of the vehicle. I’ve gotten a lot of joy from the subtle little solutions that the Tesla engineers have conjured up, from the way the vehicle Hold engages and releases smoothly and flawlessly, to the design of the air vents that use a jet of air to change the elevation of their direction.

The car is engaging to drive, and any drive is dominated by that immediate mountain of instant torque, which most passengers can’t believe is from the slowest Tesla on the market. Far less shouty is it’s handling, and whilst the electric steering isn’t the most communicative, does let you enjoy a traditional RWD experience that’s enhanced by the car’s low centre of gravity. All that mass down low however does make itself felt during braking and to a lesser extent in the ride which is comfortable without being plush. You can feel that this is a heavy car, and even with the assistance of the regenerative braking, particularly on downhill sections, on any mildly spirited drive you find yourself digging in for more assistance from the brake pedal like you would in a luxury spec SUV.

B59B420B-B1B9-454D-8A19-3C4B986B759E.jpeg


Whilst there is a long list of first rate things that the car does like the excellent headlights or the smoothness of progress with electric drive, there remain some flaws that remind you that it’s impossible to find perfection (and please everyone). By far the most frustrating aspect has been the TACC, with far too many phantom braking events than would be found in a first generation AEB from ten years ago. The formula for stopping and taking off again seems to be back to front, and I would much prefer it if it would brake gently / cautiously to a stop and then be more aggressive in keeping the gap to the car in front constant when moving off. Instead the car performs a P Plateresque late braking manoeuvre into stopped traffic and then moves away from a stop too slowly.

With the amount of information online and resources like this forum, I’ve found it very easy to transition into the electric car way of doing things. Adopting tactics like showing the battery percentage instead of kms, getting comfortable with running it down to lower percentages, testing out different local chargers, and understanding the mindshift of a top up charging strategy from the old way of filling up the tank when on road trips all contribute to reducing the reality of range anxiety. The reality is that the battery has enough range to get me to any number of charging locations, and can go for longer than my bladder can on any road trip.

There has been some change required, but it’s been easy and the end result has been a lot better. I can’t remember the last time I enjoyed a car this much (I didn’t even mention how comfortable the front seats are), and that was such a joy to drive.
 
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1 month owner and 1400kms here and I found that changing the battery to km is better for me as I can roughly gauge how far I can push the car before needing to charge. I realised that I get range anxiety when it is in percentage since I don't know how far more it can go but changing to KM and knowing the distance of my travel puts me in ease. I think the lowest I went with percentage was around 25% before I panic to find a charging station while the lowest KM I have reached is 50km which is close to 10%.
 
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Maximillan

Member
Oct 30, 2021
137
149
Sydney
For long trips I rely on the car's navigation to work out how far I can go, and I think that's the mindshift, let the car do the calculations for you. I recently did Syd - Canberra and the nav's plan orginally had me stopping for a top up in Goulburn, however well before Goulburn it recalculated that I could push on to Canberra without stopping and arrive with 10%. I've seen enough Bjorn videos that I trusted the car (we arrived with 10%) and also knew that the car probably has another 30-40kms buffer built in.

Most of the time when I'm around town I don't pay attention to it, but just fully charge it to 100% once a week.
 
Thanks for sharing your views. Largely mirror my thoughts and experiences.

Definitely agree that it is a pleasure to own the vehicle. If I was to complain about something at the moment, it would be the user interface which I find unnecessarily confusing and difficult to use, and the lack of third-party charging support (e.g. within navigation, preconditioning etc.).
 
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Maximillan

Member
Oct 30, 2021
137
149
Sydney
If I was to complain about something at the moment, it would be the user interface which I find unnecessarily confusing and difficult to use
I was fortunate that I read @Vostok post on here about how he doesn't install new updates until he sees the feedback on the forums about it. I held off installing the Holiday update, and after a week or so the car stops prompting you to install the new update. So now I'm just waiting to see what Tesla does to address the new UI.
 
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For long trips I rely on the car's navigation to work out how far I can go, and I think that's the mindshift, let the car do the calculations for you. I recently did Syd - Canberra and the nav's plan orginally had me stopping for a top up in Goulburn, however well before Goulburn it recalculated that I could push on to Canberra without stopping and arrive with 10%. I've seen enough Bjorn videos that I trusted the car (we arrived with 10%) and also knew that the car probably has another 30-40kms buffer built in.

Most of the time when I'm around town I don't pay attention to it, but just fully charge it to 100% once a week.
Out of curiosity, where in sydney to where in canberra? i thought that trip was <300kms which with a full charge i thought you wouldn't even need to think about?
 

Maximillan

Member
Oct 30, 2021
137
149
Sydney
Out of curiosity, where in sydney to where in canberra? i thought that trip was <300kms which with a full charge i thought you wouldn't even need to think about?
Chatswood to Canberra CBD via Wollongong. Canberra is a higher elevation than Sydney, so that requires more charge. Here's the trip meter on arrival, note that I've just plugged in the UMC so the car arrived with 10% SOC indicated.

IMG_6138.jpg
 
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lordh

Member
Dec 18, 2013
28
19
United States
View attachment 755151

It’s now been two months and I’ve travelled 3000kms in my SR+, and I thought I would try to capture some of my thoughts and experience with the car.

The transition to the Tesla way of doing things has been easier than I had imagined, interestingly the multifunction stalks required more thought and practice than the single screen interface. There is a lot of thought and engineering that has gone into the user experience that contributes to the delight of driving the car and that helps you overlook the flaws of the vehicle. I’ve gotten a lot of joy from the subtle little solutions that the Tesla engineers have conjured up, from the way the vehicle Hold engages and releases smoothly and flawlessly, to the design of the air vents that use a jet of air to change the elevation of their direction.

The car is engaging to drive, and any drive is dominated by that immediate mountain of instant torque, which most passengers can’t believe is from the slowest Tesla on the market. Far less shouty is it’s handling, and whilst the electric steering isn’t the most communicative, does let you enjoy a traditional RWD experience that’s enhanced by the car’s low centre of gravity. All that mass down low however does make itself felt during braking and to a lesser extent in the ride which is comfortable without being plush. You can feel that this is a heavy car, and even with the assistance of the regenerative braking, particularly on downhill sections, on any mildly spirited drive you find yourself digging in for more assistance from the brake pedal like you would in a luxury spec SUV.

View attachment 755152

Whilst there is a long list of first rate things that the car does like the excellent headlights or the smoothness of progress with electric drive, there remain some flaws that remind you that it’s impossible to find perfection (and please everyone). By far the most frustrating aspect has been the TACC, with far too many phantom braking events than would be found in a first generation AEB from ten years ago. The formula for stopping and taking off again seems to be back to front, and I would much prefer it if it would brake gently / cautiously to a stop and then be more aggressive in keeping the gap to the car in front constant when moving off. Instead the car performs a P Plateresque late braking manoeuvre into stopped traffic and then moves away from a stop too slowly.

With the amount of information online and resources like this forum, I’ve found it very easy to transition into the electric car way of doing things. Adopting tactics like showing the battery percentage instead of kms, getting comfortable with running it down to lower percentages, testing out different local chargers, and understanding the mindshift of a top up charging strategy from the old way of filling up the tank when on road trips all contribute to reducing the reality of range anxiety. The reality is that the battery has enough range to get me to any number of charging locations, and can go for longer than my bladder can on any road trip.

There has been some change required, but it’s been easy and the end result has been a lot better. I can’t remember the last time I enjoyed a car this much (I didn’t even mention how comfortable the front seats are), and that was such a joy to drive.
What a refreshingly unbiased review. I own a 2015 Model S70D AP1 and still love it But it has the same TACC characteristic of late braking and slow takeoff from standstill (I often find myself tapping the accelerator to get it moving)
 

Vostok

Active Member
Jul 1, 2017
1,927
2,079
Sydney
For you slowing too fast using AP try setting your vehicle distance to 7, it should give you a much more gradual stop. See if it works for you.

That's a double-edged sword. I find on high-speed divided roads, where there are crossing points for traffic coming the other way to turn into a side road across the carriageway you are on, the TACC is very trigger-happy.

It will hit the brakes when it thinks you might slam into a car crossing the carriageway, even if that car is 200m away. Very disconcerting because when this has happened there has been no risk of any collision whatsoever. That car crossing is long gone before you're anywhere near it. But cars behind you going at 110 think you're an idiot for slamming the brakes on. And thank goodness so far this hasn't happened when someone has been right on my butt.

Increasing the following distance setting will make TACC even more trigger-happy.
 

cafz

Member
Jul 17, 2020
663
608
Australia
Chatswood to Canberra CBD via Wollongong. Canberra is a higher elevation than Sydney, so that requires more charge.
To put some numbers around this, a fully laden 2021 SR+ (LFP) going up the 600m altitude from Sydney to Canberra requires 7% of the battery just to cover the gravitational potential energy gain.

You get a lot of it back (just losing some to the efficiency of regen) on your way back down the range, though!
 
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To put some numbers around this, a fully laden 2021 SR+ (LFP) going up the 600m altitude from Sydney to Canberra requires 7% of the battery just to cover the gravitational potential energy gain.

You get a lot of it back (just losing some to the efficiency of regen) on your way back down the range, though!
Interesting! Honestly hadn’t even really though about how elevation would play a part. I wonder if things like a better route planner take this into account, surely?
 

cafz

Member
Jul 17, 2020
663
608
Australia
Interesting! Honestly hadn’t even really though about how elevation would play a part. I wonder if things like a better route planner take this into account, surely?
They do, as does the in-car navigation (although the latter obviously does not know how much extra weight you're carrying - you can tell ABRP, though). If you plot an ABRP route down some steep escarpment you can see more estimated battery % at the destination than the origin.

Once you start driving an EV, if you keep an eye on the efficiency you tend to become a lot more aware of the elevation changes on the roads you drive!
 
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Vostok

Active Member
Jul 1, 2017
1,927
2,079
Sydney
Interesting! Honestly hadn’t even really though about how elevation would play a part.

I like this pic my passenger took while diriving up and down Cambewarra mountain near Kangaroo Valley last year. It shows how much energy generation and consumption changes going up and down very steep hills.

The onscreen energy chart maxes out at 600 Wh/km consumption and 200 Wh/km generation.

Going Sydney to Canberra is just like this, but over a much longer horizontal distance 😄

E51261F9-632E-4EBB-A702-178CD3B97824.jpeg
 

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