Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register
  • Want to remove ads? Register an account and login to see fewer ads, and become a Supporting Member to remove almost all ads.
  • The final cut of TMC Podcast #29 is available now with topics time-stamped. We discussed the Tesla Cybertruck's expected 1 MW Ultra-Fast Charging capability, the Tesla Semi Delivery Event, the coming Model 3 refresh (project "Highland"), and more. You can watch it now on YouTube.

Stability Mgt and Traction Control

FlasherZ

Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv
Jun 21, 2012
7,030
1,030
You can disable traction control by a setting in the controls.
You cannot disable electronic stability control without pulling a fuse, which in turn also takes out a few other components (power steering comes to mind).
 

3mp_kwh

Active Member
Feb 13, 2013
1,137
327
Boston
Yes, it was and still is, on some Teslas.

Going into the lower left hand 'Controls' tab, and selecting 'Driving', it may be all AWD "D" owners who now see 'Slip Start' in the upper left. The option for an on/off slider going to 'Traction Control Off' used to be where this new (very) low-speed feature was added.

S85, P85, P85+, or possibly all RWD Teslas have the option for "Traction Control Off" (unless it was updated out?). In snow, with TC-Off, it is pretty easy to tell the front Stability Control remains engaged, while the rear slides freely. With TC-on, the car slows down, and allows less throttle to dig into the snow at an angle (keeping it on the arc of a curve, instead).

Jason C., of Road & Track, made reference to the P85D TC, saying "I turn the wheel and the computer pulls the plug",when he went to Lyme Rock, Climate Change: 2014 Tesla Model S P85D

Traction Control systems can look for other things than whether wheels are all rotating at the same speed. In valet mode, for instance, there is no slip before the hot-shoe Valet looses power. While that might be a good thing, it is possible for some of the same limits to be triggered by the position of the steering wheel, speed, a g-sensor, or something else, possibly well before the owner loses grip. This is where making a safe car, and a performance car, can mean different things. Drive modes can make everyone happy. :love:
 

FlasherZ

Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv
Jun 21, 2012
7,030
1,030
I can confirm that even when TC is turned off in my RWD car, the rear will not slide freely. The wheels will happily spin, but once the back of the car begins to slide to the side, the car will apply ABS braking to specific wheels (front and rear) to square the car back up in a straight line.
 

neroden

Model S Owner and Frustrated Tesla Fan
Apr 25, 2011
14,676
63,889
Ithaca, NY, USA
On my S85, "Traction Control Off" is absolutely essential to make the car move with certain types of snow conditions (thin layer of very wet crunchy stuff, going up hill) Otherwise, the car stopped and wouldn't go forward. It's actually essential Stability control remains engaged. The switch is still there as of the latest version of 6.2.
 
I can confirm that even when TC is turned off in my RWD car, the rear will not slide freely. The wheels will happily spin, but once the back of the car begins to slide to the side, the car will apply ABS braking to specific wheels (front and rear) to square the car back up in a straight line.

This is the issue. It's a small nit that I have with the car.

As I said in my lengthy post about my experience with the car I want a Model S and a GT3 and then I won't complain too much.
 

FlasherZ

Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv
Jun 21, 2012
7,030
1,030
This is the issue. It's a small nit that I have with the car.

As I said in my lengthy post about my experience with the car I want a Model S and a GT3 and then I won't complain too much.

Me too. The end of my lane road is a 180-degree turn into my garage, and in the snow I prefer to turn the wheels to the right and just give 'er hell to make the rear end spin around - having a little controlled fun. Unfortunately, Tessie says "no" when the rear end starts to slide, regardless of where the front wheels are pointed. Foiled!
 

3mp_kwh

Active Member
Feb 13, 2013
1,137
327
Boston
I can confirm that even when TC is turned off in my RWD car, the rear will not slide freely. The wheels will happily spin, but once the back of the car begins to slide to the side, the car will apply ABS braking to specific wheels (front and rear) to square the car back up in a straight line.

That's too bad, and I hate to think it might have been changed with an update but suppose that's possible. In snow, you can hear the ABS engage the front, for stability, but I heard nothing from the back. That was January. With the P85D, there isn't much telling whether it is about to understeer, oversteer, or crab, coming out of a (dry) turn. After you've entered, you really can't get there. More than half the fun of having power, to a GT3 owner, is learning to apply it between the apex and the straight. Not just the lion's share of it on the straight away. Houston?? I'm not talking about sliding. That comes after you've found the missing power. If you open the steering wheel from, say, 90 to 45 degrees, and apply the throttle and find none, you aren't close to sliding. You've been shut down. This car should be leaving orbit, converting lateral g's to forward acceleration.
 

FlasherZ

Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv
Jun 21, 2012
7,030
1,030
That's too bad, and I hate to think it might have been changed with an update but suppose that's possible. In snow, you can hear the ABS engage the front, for stability, but I heard nothing from the back. That was January. With the P85D, there isn't much telling whether it is about to understeer, oversteer, or crab, coming out of a (dry) turn. After you've entered, you really can't get there. More than half the fun of having power, to a GT3 owner, is learning to apply it between the apex and the straight. Not just the lion's share of it on the straight away. Houston?? I'm not talking about sliding. That comes after you've found the missing power. If you open the steering wheel from, say, 90 to 45 degrees, and apply the throttle and find none, you aren't close to sliding. You've been shut down. This car should be leaving orbit, converting lateral g's to forward acceleration.

This has been the behavior since the day I got the car in 2012, I tried it that winter.

I agree with you, I hate how flat it falls on its face and would really like the ability to disable ESC.
 
Agree with tstafford. Is a big hesitation from purchasing. Going to keep my Carrera 4s for now. I understand Elon wants to keep these "safe" but really need a sport stability update...I'm sure the coders can create a similar "Side slip control" or "sport plus" for owners that want ability to play. Maybe the upcoming electric GT racing series will help this out.
 

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top