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Steering Wheel

Discussion in 'Model 3' started by cfsaxNY, Jul 11, 2016.

  1. cfsaxNY

    cfsaxNY Member

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    will the steering wheel have notches at 10 and 2 o'clock like most modern day sports sedans, or will Tesla use the recent recommendation of AAA and put them at 9-3 or 8-4. The reasoning is that 10-2 pre dates power steering and air bags, making that grip no longer necessary.
     
  2. JeffK

    JeffK Active Member

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    It's not that it's "no longer necessary" it's that the 10 and 2 grip is actually dangerous. It can lead to "degloving"... google that on google images if you want a fun time.
     
    • Funny x 1
  3. jkk_

    jkk_ Member

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    Yeah, don't recommend doing that. Here's from Wikipedia: Degloving - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

     
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  4. Tiberius

    Tiberius Member

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    I've never heard of it causing degloving but I was taught in drivers ed (16 years ago) that when your hands are at 10 and 2 and you make a slight turn your forearm crosses over the airbag. Obviously not good during a collision.

    But.... To answer your question about notches in the steering wheel, the answer is the same as 99% of the other derpy questions asked here. NO ONE KNOWS YET. Gotta wait for the reveal part 2.
     
  5. Dan Detweiler

    Dan Detweiler Member

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    Not trying to stir up a hornets nest...honest, but these arguments point to a partial wheel or yolk style as being perhaps preferable to a solid wheel. I know, I know, it's too far off the main stream and people won't like it. But, it would open up all of the space above the yolk for an unobstructed view of the "dash" and windshield (HUD).

    Just sayin'

    Dan
     
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  6. JeffK

    JeffK Active Member

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    • Informative x 1
  7. Az_Rael

    Az_Rael Active Member

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    So I know I am going to date myself here, but I was taught 10-2 and the arm crossover turning method in drivers ed. I know kids today are now taught "shuffle steering" (coworker just had his kids through drivers ed), which I find to be the dumbest steering method ever. It is harder to learn, (his daughter has already been in a wreck because she couldn't get the steering wheel turned fast enough by "shuffling"). He is now teaching them the arm crossover steering method.

    So I am going to be an old fuddy on this one and shake my cane and say "kids, these days!" (Even though I am not that old, LOL)
     
  8. JeffK

    JeffK Active Member

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    99.99% of the time you're fine. It really only matters most when the airbag is deployed. If your hand or arm happens to be in front of the airbag then it can be flung into other objects such as rear view mirrors, A-pillars, or your face. The result is a fractured wrist or arm among other things. Although if it's a choice between making a turn and not making a turn then do what you have to do.
     
  9. jkk_

    jkk_ Member

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    So for the sake of 0.01% of the time break something all the time :rolleyes:

    Don't take it too seriously Dan (that's why the smiley) - we're just going to have to wait which one of us gets his way when Tesla announces the interior.
     
  10. Dan Detweiler

    Dan Detweiler Member

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    In all honesty, I am good with whatever Tesla decides to go with, within reason of course. For me, a yolk style steering mechanism would not be a deal breaker.

    Dan
     
  11. Seattle Tom

    Seattle Tom Member

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    MY GOD WHY DIDNT I LISTEN TO YOU. I googled the images and CANNOT unsee the results.

    I'll let Autpilot steer - I'm never touching a steering wheel again.
     
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  12. JeffK

    JeffK Active Member

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    sigh (hope you're joking), you have to hold the wheel. Just make sure to do it in the correct spot and you'll be perfectly fine. You might get minor superficial burns on your forearms from the hot gas, which will disappear in a few hours, and you might get a slight cough for a short while but that's normal.

    Don't get yourself on the news or give Tesla bad press. Keep your hands on the wheel and allow the car to assist you.
     
  13. EldestOyster

    EldestOyster Member

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    If the Model 3 even has a steering wheel... It will have an articulating mechanism, and the notches will move around according to the driving situation, driver's taste, and the latest firmware load.
     
  14. theboom1

    theboom1 Member

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    Who would want one without a steering wheel? You dont want to experience ludicrous mode whenever you want? Have your car be a tool and an extension of yourself for great utility? I want automaton as much as anyone but i gotta be able to drive it when I want.
     
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  15. Mishakim

    Mishakim Member

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    Sorry, this is driving me crazy - it's "yoke", like the thing attaches an ox to a cart, not "yolk," the yellow part of an egg.

    A U- or W-shaped yoke control works in aircraft, where you're not turning the control over 90 degrees, but not so much in a car, whether you're using cross-over or shuffle steering. Given that the M3 is almost certainly steer-by-wire, you could use a yoke and just hold it sideways to turn (rather than turning over past 90), maybe with increasing pressure = tighter turn, but that's yet another style of steering to learn.
     
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  16. rickrickrick

    rickrickrick Member

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    I'm waiting for the day when drive-by-wire eliminates the need to have a steering wheel. Boeing aircraft still use the yoke as input for flight controls but Airbus aircraft use what is essentially a side joystick. I don't see why you couldn't some day do the same in a Tesla.
     
  17. JeffK

    JeffK Active Member

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    While you can, one of the first car models that came out with them (infinity Q50) were recalled because they failed in certain circumstances.
     
  18. jkk_

    jkk_ Member

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    Why do you consider joysticks to be the superior control method for cars?
     
  19. Garlan Garner

    Garlan Garner Active Member

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    Absolutely Could... however would hate it. Older folks would be running into everything. I can't see that passing the National Safety board for Cars....or whatever they are called.

    Airplanes have more than a 2 dimensional need for steering.
     
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  20. Mishakim

    Mishakim Member

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    One simple reason is that the steering wheel is a source of impact trauma in a collision. Get rid of it, and you have much more room between the driver and the airbag/dash. It's also a very complex component - lots of wires (for the airbag, horn, and any controls that rotate with it) that have to go through the rotating coupling.

    I read long ago (no cite, sorry, it was something like Pop. Sci. in the 90s) that Mercedes had developed a control scheme with redundant joysticks, one for each hand. Forward/back controlled speed/braking (so no pedals either), and right/left steered. It was more intuitive, but too divergent from what people are used to, so it never went into production.
     

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