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Suitability of Model Y for the daily grind of NYC commuting?

Hi all,

I'm a newb here and please forgive my lack of knowledge. Due the pandemic, my public transportation options into NYC have been significantly reduced and it honestly remains unclear if there will be mass transit options for me in the future. For now, I've decided to attempt to live with daily driving in via the Lincoln Tunnel while in a hybrid 3x a week schedule as we get closer to our return to work date.

Currently, I drive a BMW X5 M50i which I honestly love as a vehicle on the highways and in my town but find to be very fatiguing when dealing with the stop and go traffic of the Lincoln Tunnel perhaps due to the mismatch of my power (525hp) and heavy braking of the vehicle (great for stopping power but in traffic can be a little nauseating). I also just find the car slightly too large for self-park garages and fear the inevitable door dings on such an expensive vehicle.

The MYP seems like a great option for me. It still has a decent ride height (love sedans but not when surrounded exclusively by trucks/suvs). Being 3 inches narrower doesn't seem like a big deal but would be helpful in navigating those self-park tunnels with pillars and all and likely reduces the dings. Not having a gas guzzler seems great for the daily commute (sometimes I'm getting <15mpg) and sentry mode seems like a great idea. I test drove the MYLR and while I found the suspension surprisingly unrefined, I do think I can live with that and some of its other quirks.

However, my question to anybody that deals with 45 minutes to 1 hour of stop and go traffic which feels like a knife fight where you are merging into lanes and nobody wants to give up an inch (myself included) which likely means autopilot is a non-option here, am I barking up the wrong tree with the MYP? I figured one pedal driving may actually be less fatiguing than the constant lurching and sudden stopping between two pedals. But perhaps the instant torque (particularly with the performance model), regenerative breaking, lack of creeping makes this even more fatiguing than my current setup. This was not something I was able to test easily during my test drive.

Anybody with experience here would be much appreciated as I'm scheduled for delivery in February but part of me wonders if this is a bad idea and I should just let go of the $250 deposit as I'm not solving for the right problem here. Thanks in advance.
 

jcanoe

Well-Known Member
Oct 2, 2020
6,816
7,728
Maryland
When you drive an electric vehicle, they all pretty much offer instant torque and acceleration from standing still to well beyond the speed limit. Traction control will limit wheel slip when road surfaces are wet. You can pull away from a light, merge with authority with the knowledge that unless the other drivers have manual transmissions their vehicles will still be revving the engine, shifting into 1st or 2nd gear when you are through the merge or intersection and well beyond if there is space. Many newer vehicles have start/stop technology so you won't have to worry about out maneuvering a vehicle that has to first start the gas engine.

The flip side is that when driving in stop and go traffic the Tesla Autopilot (also known as Tesla Adaptive Cruise Control) lets you relax a little as the Tesla vehicle can automatically maintain a set distance to the vehicle in front of the Tesla. You can set the follow distance to be quite close however someone can still not yield to your vehicle and cut into your lane.

Also true is that the latest Tesla Model Y vehicles use camera based adaptive cruise control instead of relying on radar. Not often discussed is that the no longer available radar cruise control could, under some conditions, gauge the speed of the vehicle in front of the vehicle ahead of the Tesla vehicle (two vehicles ahead) to anticipate whether to start braking. Again I have not read much about this see beyond capability lately.

If you drive a vehicle with low profile tires, the Performance Model Y comes with 255/35R-21 (Front) and 275/35R-21 (Rear) Michelin Pilot Sport 4 all-season tires, you may lose a few battles with NYC's famous pot holes. My sister and brother in law did until they stopped driving a sedan and started driving an SUV with different wheels.
 
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jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Moderator
Nov 28, 2018
17,606
23,684
Riverside Co. CA
Hi all,

I'm a newb here and please forgive my lack of knowledge. Due the pandemic, my public transportation options into NYC have been significantly reduced and it honestly remains unclear if there will be mass transit options for me in the future. For now, I've decided to attempt to live with daily driving in via the Lincoln Tunnel while in a hybrid 3x a week schedule as we get closer to our return to work date.

Currently, I drive a BMW X5 M50i which I honestly love as a vehicle on the highways and in my town but find to be very fatiguing when dealing with the stop and go traffic of the Lincoln Tunnel perhaps due to the mismatch of my power (525hp) and heavy braking of the vehicle (great for stopping power but in traffic can be a little nauseating). I also just find the car slightly too large for self-park garages and fear the inevitable door dings on such an expensive vehicle.

The MYP seems like a great option for me. It still has a decent ride height (love sedans but not when surrounded exclusively by trucks/suvs). Being 3 inches narrower doesn't seem like a big deal but would be helpful in navigating those self-park tunnels with pillars and all and likely reduces the dings. Not having a gas guzzler seems great for the daily commute (sometimes I'm getting <15mpg) and sentry mode seems like a great idea. I test drove the MYLR and while I found the suspension surprisingly unrefined, I do think I can live with that and some of its other quirks.

However, my question to anybody that deals with 45 minutes to 1 hour of stop and go traffic which feels like a knife fight where you are merging into lanes and nobody wants to give up an inch (myself included) which likely means autopilot is a non-option here, am I barking up the wrong tree with the MYP? I figured one pedal driving may actually be less fatiguing than the constant lurching and sudden stopping between two pedals. But perhaps the instant torque (particularly with the performance model), regenerative breaking, lack of creeping makes this even more fatiguing than my current setup. This was not something I was able to test easily during my test drive.

Anybody with experience here would be much appreciated as I'm scheduled for delivery in February but part of me wonders if this is a bad idea and I should just let go of the $250 deposit as I'm not solving for the right problem here. Thanks in advance.

I think that, once you get in your lane, you could drive on autopilot. I personally find stop n go traffic the best application of autopilot (0-25 to 30 mph). I know this is the model Y subforum, and I have a model 3 not a Y, but for this application they are similar. My wife has an X3 M40i so not quite the same vehicle you have, but similar but smaller profile.

Where you may be unhappy, actually, is the X5 is a pretty luxurious vehicle. If you are used to BMW luxury, and that is part of the consideration, you will likely be disappointed as even though this is an expensive car, you are paying for the battery tech, not luxury.

Have you considered the BMW iX? We thought about it, but I am happy with my model 3, and the iX is out of the price range I would want to spend (but its squarely in the price range of a X5 M50).

You could also lease it, and make a decision after 3 years as BMWs likely still lease ok even with the current market.
 
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When I've used auto cruise control on my x5 (shore traffic) it generally leaves at least a car gap between me and the car in front of me. Obviously, this is ideal for safety and to smooth out the ride but will result in people hating you at the Lincon Tunnel as everyone and their mother cuts in front of you endlessly. Does the Tesla autopilot actually allow for small enough gaps that nobody can inch their way in?

I have come to terms with the build quality of the MYP and I agree its a complete step down from what I'm used to. In fact, when I optioned my X5 M50I, I basically checked almost everything. The "vegan" leather of the Tesla to me is worse than the vinyl options in MB and BMW but I can live with it although full Merino Leather with quilted stitching is NIIIICE. I found the seat also less comfortable than the X5 by a mile and also worse than the x3's that I've driven as a loaner. I know its gimmicky but the ambient lighting, especially the light refracting pano roof on the M50I (I don't think this can be optioned in the base) is super cool. And It shocks me that Tesla has no heads up display.

However, my assumption my x5 m50I is too nice to drive into the city everyday. It would pain me to see what condition it will be in after daily commutes as opposed to its current condition which looks basically brand new with less than 13K miles after two years. I figured the MYP would hold relatively decent value in 2-3 years and I won't have to be so precious with is (although I would still probably PPF the entire car).

I actually did consider the X3/X4 M40i. Last I checked, the order time is only about 8-10 weeks and the MSRP is quite similar to the MYP. Comfort probably is even better than the MYP. However it pains me to see all the gloss on the center console of the vehicle (I suppose I could have an aftermarket wrapped placed on it) and the interior design is getting a little old in the tooth.

In my ideal scenario, I would just get a Macan S or Macan GTS but the Macan S is slower than the Tesla. My initial thought was one pedal driving may actually be better for the tunnel (although I'm not second guessing myself and looking for those with experience). And while I love the Macan S, when optioned out it would be a good $15K more than the MYP and then there is sales tax and whatever "market adjustment" the dealership is going to add. Plus the wait time looks like 5-7 months (and GTS is even longer). Given that price difference, I worry that I will baby the Macan S and not treat it like a daily.

I am also considering the IX and the i4 m50i. But like you said, I'm pushing $100k for that vehicle for the 50 variant (not even sure what the m60 price is) and as far as I know the initial deliveries are sold out so I'm looking at more like end of 2022. I have a deposit for a Rivian R1S which they claim will get delivered in 2H23 (I assume 2024) and at that point will probably trade in my X5 m50I for either the R1S, IX M60, Macan EV unless I can find a reasonably priced used Audi RS6 Avant out there.

But again, those cars are all meant to be wow cars, where I can generally baby it and not worry about the wear and tear of 15k+ miles a year.
 
When you drive an electric vehicle, they all pretty much offer instant torque and acceleration from standing still to well beyond the speed limit. Traction control will limit wheel slip when road surfaces are wet. You can pull away from a light, merge with authority with the knowledge that unless the other drivers have manual transmissions their vehicles will still be revving the engine, shifting into 1st or 2nd gear when you are through the merge or intersection and well beyond if there is space. Many newer vehicles have start/stop technology so you won't have to worry about out maneuvering a vehicle that has to first start the gas engine.

The flip side is that when driving in stop and go traffic the Tesla Autopilot (also known as Tesla Adaptive Cruise Control) lets you relax a little as the Tesla vehicle can automatically maintain a set distance to the vehicle in front of the Tesla. You can set the follow distance to be quite close however someone can still not yield to your vehicle and cut into your lane.

Also true is that the latest Tesla Model Y vehicles use camera based adaptive cruise control instead of relying on radar. Not often discussed is that the no longer available radar cruise control could, under some conditions, gauge the speed of the vehicle in front of the vehicle ahead of the Tesla vehicle (two vehicles ahead) to anticipate whether to start braking. Again I have not read much about this see beyond capability lately.

If you drive a vehicle with low profile tires, the Performance Model Y comes with 255/35R-21 (Front) and 275/35R-21 (Rear) Michelin Pilot Sport 4 all-season tires, you may lose a few battles with NYC's famous pot holes. My sister and brother in law did until they stopped driving a sedan and started driving an SUV with different wheels.
I am also concerned about the curb rash that this car will take over time and while run flats certainly have issues on ride quality, there is something to be said about driving to my local dealership after getting a flat. Honestly, I haven't even looked too much into what my options will be with Tesla and a flat. I assume I have to get AAA again and ask for a tow.

Like your sister and bro-in-law, I love sedans to death and my last car was a C43 which was great for local driving. Alas, I had two cracked windshields from SUV's/Trucks spewing rocks into them and on highway traffic, I really got frustrated not being able to see what the traffic was like in front of the car that was in front of me (I look through the car in front of me to see whether brake lights are going on ahead of them an can't do that in a sedan). Sadly, I have joined the SUV world and looks like I may never be able to go back although the Taycan or Audi Rs6 Avant tempt me back every now and then.
 
If you go with the MYP I'd swap the 21's for some 19's with some meatier tires and a square setup. The roads on the island can kill those ubers fast. PFF the front. I've been in the x4 m40i and was not impressed. I can't believe it's the same price as a MYP, insano.
Before the pandemic, I assume I could have gotten 10% off the X4 m40i and with the residual games BMW plays, it probably was worth the money. I have a hard time swallowing a market adjustment on on top of MSRP for the x4 m40i. A full on x3m or x4m would be lovely but I have heard the suspension on that is REALLY rough and once again I'm back in the $80's and it sounds like allocation on the real M cars would probably put me in September at the earliest. This is all what has led me down the path of the MYP. Basically to me, I'm giving up a bunch of luxuries but I do get performance at a price considerably cheaper than its peers. Plus with 0% sales tax in NJ on EV's, I can use those proceeds to actually install the 60amp line in my garage as a capital improvement. But I am having second thoughts as I don't really know if the MYP as a daily driver into NYC is actually a good idea or not.
 

DayTrippin

Active Member
Supporting Member
Apr 30, 2021
1,755
2,195
Park Cities, TX
For your purpose, the MY LR might make more sense. The ride is less punishing on most roads and the point and shoot acceleration is still outstanding. It might be a touch slower 0-60 but will be faster in the 1/4. The 19" tires are definitely more compliant over most road surfaces and you might be able to get by with them all year round.

I agree the interior could be more upscale but I've come to terms with it over the last 7 months. The car just works well in ever day driving and I just drove half way across the US. My appreciation for it grows ever day. Only once in a while do I miss my past MBs or BMWs. I gave up a little luxury but got an amazing daily driver in return.
 

jcanoe

Well-Known Member
Oct 2, 2020
6,816
7,728
Maryland
I am also concerned about the curb rash that this car will take over time and while run flats certainly have issues on ride quality, there is something to be said about driving to my local dealership after getting a flat. Honestly, I haven't even looked too much into what my options will be with Tesla and a flat. I assume I have to get AAA again and ask for a tow.
Like your sister and bro-in-law, I love sedans to death and my last car was a C43 which was great for local driving. Alas, I had two cracked windshields from SUV's/Trucks spewing rocks into them and on highway traffic, I really got frustrated not being able to see what the traffic was like in front of the car that was in front of me (I look through the car in front of me to see whether brake lights are going on ahead of them an can't do that in a sedan). Sadly, I have joined the SUV world and looks like I may never be able to go back although the Taycan or Audi Rs6 Avant tempt me back every now and then.
I am unaware of any run flat tires that meet the Tesla Performance Model Y XL rating and load index and speed rating: 103Y XL The way it is supposed to work when you get a flat is either use the Tesla tire inflator kit (no longer listed on the Tesla.com store site) else contact Tesla Roadside Assistance. Roadside Assistance can dispatch a contracted tow service with a flat bed truck. The tow service may also carry a spare Tesla wheel and tire to get you on your way. You then have 48 hours (some say 72 hours) to repair or replace your damaged tire or wheel and return the loaner wheel before Tesla will charge your credit card for the loaner wheel and tire. It doesn't always work as there are three different size OE wheels for the Tesla Model Y, not including the staggered front and rear wheels on the Performance Model Y.
 

Bookman

MYLR/5/Blue/Black/19”/No tow or FSD.
Jan 3, 2022
63
107
Atlanta, GA
Hi all,

I'm a newb here and please forgive my lack of knowledge. Due the pandemic, my public transportation options into NYC have been significantly reduced and it honestly remains unclear if there will be mass transit options for me in the future. For now, I've decided to attempt to live with daily driving in via the Lincoln Tunnel while in a hybrid 3x a week schedule as we get closer to our return to work date.

Currently, I drive a BMW X5 M50i which I honestly love as a vehicle on the highways and in my town but find to be very fatiguing when dealing with the stop and go traffic of the Lincoln Tunnel perhaps due to the mismatch of my power (525hp) and heavy braking of the vehicle (great for stopping power but in traffic can be a little nauseating). I also just find the car slightly too large for self-park garages and fear the inevitable door dings on such an expensive vehicle.

The MYP seems like a great option for me. It still has a decent ride height (love sedans but not when surrounded exclusively by trucks/suvs). Being 3 inches narrower doesn't seem like a big deal but would be helpful in navigating those self-park tunnels with pillars and all and likely reduces the dings. Not having a gas guzzler seems great for the daily commute (sometimes I'm getting <15mpg) and sentry mode seems like a great idea. I test drove the MYLR and while I found the suspension surprisingly unrefined, I do think I can live with that and some of its other quirks.

However, my question to anybody that deals with 45 minutes to 1 hour of stop and go traffic which feels like a knife fight where you are merging into lanes and nobody wants to give up an inch (myself included) which likely means autopilot is a non-option here, am I barking up the wrong tree with the MYP? I figured one pedal driving may actually be less fatiguing than the constant lurching and sudden stopping between two pedals. But perhaps the instant torque (particularly with the performance model), regenerative breaking, lack of creeping makes this even more fatiguing than my current setup. This was not something I was able to test easily during my test drive.

Anybody with experience here would be much appreciated as I'm scheduled for delivery in February but part of me wonders if this is a bad idea and I should just let go of the $250 deposit as I'm not solving for the right problem here. Thanks in advance.
I rented a Y for a 10 day road trip last September and got into 30-40 minutes of stop and go traffic twice. The adaptive cruise control (Tesla calls it Traffic-Aware Cruise Control) worked flawlessly. I can’t remember the approximate following distance, which you can adjust, but do remember that nobody cut in front of me. With the brake on the hold setting it was NO pedal driving. When the car in front creeped, so did the Tesla; when the car in front fully stopped, so did the Tesla; when the car in front started moving again, so did the Tesla. I couldn’t believe how much less stressful the stop and go was and I was so impressed that I immediately ordered one on returning home. My EDD is Feb 2-Mar 2 or hopefully sooner :).
 
For your purpose, the MY LR might make more sense. The ride is less punishing on most roads and the point and shoot acceleration is still outstanding. It might be a touch slower 0-60 but will be faster in the 1/4. The 19" tires are definitely more compliant over most road surfaces and you might be able to get by with them all year round.

I agree the interior could be more upscale but I've come to terms with it over the last 7 months. The car just works well in ever day driving and I just drove half way across the US. My appreciation for it grows ever day. Only once in a while do I miss my past MBs or BMWs. I gave up a little luxury but got an amazing daily driver in return.
I think that was my initial inclination about giving up some luxury. We keep the m50I for the luxury but unload a 2013 x5 that is more basic and has been having more maintenance costs as of lately. It would be nice to have one car where we care less if the kids are muddy and are more loose with the rules about food in the car. I figured the model Y has been tested out by hundreds of thousands of people and so the kinks have been worked out (for the most part) and it will set a benchmark that I can compare future EV purchases with. I believe there are about 50,000 preorders ahead of me on the Rivian and I'm actually a bit worried there that the number is too low for some of the issues to be identified and by the time my delivery is ready.

As for the MY LR, I also believe the LR makes more sense but when I ordered in December, June seemed really far out as compared to February for the MYP. At the time of the deposit, my office was planning a return to work for Jan 1st and we had already been going in 1x a week. However, the omicron surge has pushed that out to some undefined period (guess is Feb or Mar). If the price gap between the two models were wider like they were 18 months ago, then I probably would have waited for the MY LR. However, the gap today has narrowed quite a bit and so at that point, I figure I may as well go MYP for the shorter wait time, fun factor, and principle that the MYP has not increased in price as much as the LR. I also chose the grey metallic and black interior to cut down on cost so in my mind its only about $1k more expensive than 18 months ago (as compared to the options I probably would have chosen back then).
 
I am also concerned about the curb rash that this car will take over time and while run flats certainly have issues on ride quality, there is something to be said about driving to my local dealership after getting a flat. Honestly, I haven't even looked too much into what my options will be with Tesla and a flat. I assume I have to get AAA again and ask for a tow.

I am unaware of any run flat tires that meet the Tesla Performance Model Y XL rating and load index and speed rating: 103Y XL The way it is supposed to work when you get a flat is either use the Tesla tire inflator kit (no longer listed on the Tesla.com store site) else contact Tesla Roadside Assistance. Roadside Assistance can dispatch a contracted tow service with a flat bed truck. The tow service may also carry a spare Tesla wheel and tire to get you on your way. You then have 48 hours (some say 72 hours) to repair or replace your damaged tire or wheel and return the loaner wheel before Tesla will charge your credit card for the loaner wheel and tire. It doesn't always work as there are three different size OE wheels for the Tesla Model Y, not including the staggered front and rear wheels on the Performance Model Y.
Thanks for the information about flat tire process with Tesla. Very helpful to know and given my proximity to NYC, I suspect that this service may be fairly decent then.
 

cgell

Member
Supporting Member
Jan 30, 2020
443
598
NJ
I love my Y (LR), but as someone who has driven that route many times I would definitely say to experience the ride quality before committing. NYC has some rough streets and the Y is not very forgiving, especially the YP. I have had a 335 and X3 previously, so I know about the stiff/sporty feel of BMW suspension… the Y is a noticeably rougher ride. I am not recommending against it, but it is something to be aware of.
 
i have a Y and an S and while I no longer commute into the city every day, I do live in Montclair and go in often enough. The Ys ride is rougher than the S for sure, but it can’t be compared to the horrible ride of, say, BMWs. I have yet to scream a curse word at the top of my lungs from the famed BMW explosion you get when you hit a pothole in one of those things. We have a 2020 model so I can’t say anything about the cars with vision but the automatic lane keeping and cruise control of FSD (we have can’t speak to cars that don’t) makes stop and go traffic easy. Heck, I bought our first Tesla after experiencing autopilot in stop and go traffic on 17 in Paramus while on a test drive.

No more range anxiety either. We plug in our cars every few days so when we go into the city we have no worries. Too many times I was late for dinner coming home, didn’t fill up, then left on a 1/4 tank and was terrified I wouldn’t make it back to that exxon by the holland tunnel.

In two years of the S and eighteen months of the Y we haven’t had a single flat, had to replace a single rim, or any blowouts. Try that in a BMW. I just replaced the tires that came with the S after 20,000 miles. In over a decade of owning BMWs we never, ever wound up with tires that we wore out, they always blew first. But we also run on 19” rims on both cars, not on lower profile tires more analogous to the strangely fashion forward BMWs (so weird, since lower profile tires don’t improve handling…just the opposite, ask a race car driver as I have).

Also, you’ll soon find the interior design is much better than late model BMWs, which seem to have been influenced but the Transformers franchise having a love child with a Civic. I rented a new Z4 in LA last month and it was horrible to use the interface. Give me the Tesla any day, although since I am a designer this bothers me more. The only things I’ll grant the BMW is the leather was nice and the steering wheel had a nice perforated cover. I liked those.
 
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The suspension was the first thing I noticed when I test drove the MY LR back in November in the Westchester area (as NJ locations are closed on Sundays). I noticed that it was very firm and we could feel the bumps in the road and was definitely firmer than any other car i've bought even when those cars were in sports mode. After that test drive I basically just said, this is probably a non-starter. However, over the next few weeks I just kept getting drawn back to the idea of the vehicle when the ICE competition either cost considerable more for similar performance (although better suspension).

Perhaps I should just go out and test drive the vehicle again, this time on Route 17 during heavy traffic days just to see if its tolerable or not as well as get a better sense of autopilot.

I also test drove the EQS and my god the approach was completely different. Was a very supple and relaxing ride which is great if thats what you're looking for. In some respects that may be an even better daily driver into the city if not for the fact that its massive (just as wide as my x5 and like 13 inches longer) and costs $120k+.
 

cgell

Member
Supporting Member
Jan 30, 2020
443
598
NJ
The suspension was the first thing I noticed when I test drove the MY LR back in November in the Westchester area (as NJ locations are closed on Sundays). I noticed that it was very firm and we could feel the bumps in the road and was definitely firmer than any other car i've bought even when those cars were in sports mode. After that test drive I basically just said, this is probably a non-starter. However, over the next few weeks I just kept getting drawn back to the idea of the vehicle when the ICE competition either cost considerable more for similar performance (although better suspension).

Perhaps I should just go out and test drive the vehicle again, this time on Route 17 during heavy traffic days just to see if its tolerable or not as well as get a better sense of autopilot.

I also test drove the EQS and my god the approach was completely different. Was a very supple and relaxing ride which is great if thats what you're looking for. In some respects that may be an even better daily driver into the city if not for the fact that its massive (just as wide as my x5 and like 13 inches longer) and costs $120k+.
You could always get an aftermarket comfort coilover upgrade kit as there are several options out there. But the stock ride is a bit rough for pothole lined NYC streets. Great vehicle otherwise though.
 
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My initial thought was one pedal driving may actually be better for the tunnel
I find that one-pedal driving is one of the biggest de-stressors of Tesla driving. Even in situations too aggressive for TACC, not moving my foot between accelerator and brake, not to mention hold mode (so I don't need to press to brake to remain stopped) makes for a much less stressful experience in stop-and-go traffic.
 

MG535

3SR+ Red/black/19s (18s for winter)
Jul 22, 2021
248
188
NJ USA
Hi all,

I'm a newb here and please forgive my lack of knowledge. Due the pandemic, my public transportation options into NYC have been significantly reduced and it honestly remains unclear if there will be mass transit options for me in the future. For now, I've decided to attempt to live with daily driving in via the Lincoln Tunnel while in a hybrid 3x a week schedule as we get closer to our return to work date.

Currently, I drive a BMW X5 M50i which I honestly love as a vehicle on the highways and in my town but find to be very fatiguing when dealing with the stop and go traffic of the Lincoln Tunnel perhaps due to the mismatch of my power (525hp) and heavy braking of the vehicle (great for stopping power but in traffic can be a little nauseating). I also just find the car slightly too large for self-park garages and fear the inevitable door dings on such an expensive vehicle.

The MYP seems like a great option for me. It still has a decent ride height (love sedans but not when surrounded exclusively by trucks/suvs). Being 3 inches narrower doesn't seem like a big deal but would be helpful in navigating those self-park tunnels with pillars and all and likely reduces the dings. Not having a gas guzzler seems great for the daily commute (sometimes I'm getting <15mpg) and sentry mode seems like a great idea. I test drove the MYLR and while I found the suspension surprisingly unrefined, I do think I can live with that and some of its other quirks.

However, my question to anybody that deals with 45 minutes to 1 hour of stop and go traffic which feels like a knife fight where you are merging into lanes and nobody wants to give up an inch (myself included) which likely means autopilot is a non-option here, am I barking up the wrong tree with the MYP? I figured one pedal driving may actually be less fatiguing than the constant lurching and sudden stopping between two pedals. But perhaps the instant torque (particularly with the performance model), regenerative breaking, lack of creeping makes this even more fatiguing than my current setup. This was not something I was able to test easily during my test drive.

Anybody with experience here would be much appreciated as I'm scheduled for delivery in February but part of me wonders if this is a bad idea and I should just let go of the $250 deposit as I'm not solving for the right problem here. Thanks in advance.
The Lincoln is arguably the worst of all 3 NJ-Manhattan entrances, it’s flow is so poorly designed that the knife fight is inevitable.

TBH I’d look for something a lot more expendable, something that will have no emotional attachment. Like a Prius or something. Bonus is that even with high miles and lots of dings you can sell it for cash very easily.
 

MG535

3SR+ Red/black/19s (18s for winter)
Jul 22, 2021
248
188
NJ USA
Thinking out of the box here and not necessarily a direct answer to your question but due to the unforgiving RE market some of our friends & family have moved to where public transportation is not good. So they drive to somewhere where it is and use public transit for the last leg into the city.

Driving to a NJT or PATH station or ferry terminal might be an option worth looking at.
 
All good points. Value is in the eye of the beholder. $64k is not cheap by any means but given my options if going the electric route, it does seem relatively expendable. Moreover, the Prius 0-60 of ~9+ seconds scares me. Sub 5 sec 0-60 cars give me confidence (perhaps false confidence) when it comes to getting on highways, switching lanes, etc.

You do bring up a decent point about NJT, Path of Ferry and its something I should look into. As it stands now, my current bus route does not work with my work hours but finding a nearby town with a more frequent schedule could also save time on with the Lincoln Tunnel bus-only lane and also save on overall total cost of ownership (given the cost of parking and EZ-Pass). Call me paranoid, but I still like the idea of Sentry mode on the Teslas. I just saw that the new BMW IX has a camera in the car that will record faces on the inside if there is a theft. I also theorized (but perhaps its completely a bad theory) that thefts of EVs are lower than ICE vehicles (can anyone confirm that?)
 

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