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Supercharger - Brandon, MB

MarcoRP

Well-Known Member
Sep 6, 2017
5,218
10,836
Montréal
Just saw an update on Twitter from TeslaOwnersSK for the new Brandon Supercharger that is under construction for the first Supercharger in Manitoba! It’s the same type of installation that we’ve seen at Moose Jaw and others in W. Ontario. Will update Supercharge Info.
0F5D0313-1271-4402-A5E6-58CD5555A9ED.jpeg
 

MarcoRP

Well-Known Member
Sep 6, 2017
5,218
10,836
Montréal
Since there was also evidence for the permit status on Supercharge Info, but that was posted on the Mid-Canada Superchargers thread, I’ve changed the link on Supercharge Info and will link the original post via this post.
Mid-Canada Superchargers

Original quote below:
If you want to put up another one @BlueShift see @Chuq ’s post
7E99A84A-99E3-4E6D-93A5-5766DC72442A.png
Brandon can go in too.
 
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Zoomit

Active Member
Sep 1, 2015
2,255
4,372
SoCal
Nice. Another V3.
How are you able to tell it will be V3? Are most of the TCH sites 6-stall, 1MW V3 stations?

I guess what I'm really curious about is whether all V3 installations will always be unshared 250kW. It looks like that might not be the case.

Edit: Nevermind, found the likely explanation here: Supercharger - Moose Jaw, SK

It's perplexing that they'd have two "1MW" cabinets each feeding only 3 250kW stalls. I wonder if those cabinets won't be fully populated with chargers and will each be capable of only 750kW.
 
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Big Earl

bnkwupt
Supporting Member
Jul 12, 2017
5,954
11,245
Springfield, VA
How are you able to tell it will be V3? Are most of the TCH sites 6-stall, 1MW V3 stations?

I guess what I'm really curious about is whether all V3 installations will always be unshared 250kW. It looks like that might not be the case.

Edit: Nevermind, found the likely explanation here: Supercharger - Moose Jaw, SK

It's perplexing that they'd have two "1MW" cabinets each feeding only 3 250kW stalls. I wonder if those cabinets won't be fully populated with chargers and will each be capable of only 750kW.

Based on photos from some of the other TCH sites, including conduit labels, V3 can be identified by the layout of concrete pads and the conduit feeding them.

In the photo above, we see two large cement pads to the left, each for one V3 charging unit (the cabinet). The conduits for those pads will be labeled 1A, 1B, 1C and spare (1D) for the first cabinet and 2A, 2B, 2C and spare (2D) for the second cabinet. Moving down the row to the right, we see two smaller concrete pads with conduit labels suggesting battery storage. All the way to the right is a rectangular pad that will house the switchgear equipment.

From my understanding, each charging cabinet can support up to four 250 kW charging pedestals. On TCH, only three per cabinet will be populated, leaving room for a future expansion of two more pedestals (1D and 2D).

Note that the 1000 kVA transformer will be the limiting factor for these TCH locations if they ever get full of vehicles. The battery storage will be able to absorb some of the peak, but a busy holiday travel day could result in the site throttling to 1MW (plus instant solar production, if available) across all stalls.

I’m looking forward to seeing equipment photos of the Las Vegas V3 site. It should have 6 charging cabinets for its 24 stalls. My wild ass guess is that it’ll have a 3000 kVA transformer.
 
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Zoomit

Active Member
Sep 1, 2015
2,255
4,372
SoCal
Based on photos from some of the other TCH sites, including conduit labels, V3 can be identified by the layout of concrete pads and the conduit feeding them.

In the photo above, we see two large cement pads to the left, each for one V3 charging unit (the cabinet). The conduits for those pads will be labeled 1A, 1B, 1C and spare (1D) for the first cabinet and 2A, 2B, 2C and spare (2D) for the second cabinet. Moving down the row to the right, we see two smaller concrete cabs with conduit labels suggesting battery storage. All the way to the right is a rectangular pad that will house the switchgear equipment.

From my understanding, each charging cabinet can support up to four 250 kW charging pedestals. On TCH, only three per cabinet will be populated, leaving room for a future expansion of two more pedestals (1D and 2D).

Note that the 1000 kVA transformer will be the limiting factor for these TCH locations if they ever get full of vehicles. The battery storage will be able to absorb some of the peak, but a busy holiday travel day could result in the site throttling to 1MW (plus instant solar production, if available) across all stalls.

I’m looking forward to seeing equipment photos of the Las Vegas V3 site. It should have 6 charging cabinets for its 24 stalls. My wild ass guess is that it’ll have a 3000 kVA transformer.
Agreed--I think you've got it. I'm also curious to see if the TCH cabinets are marked or look different in any way signifying reduced (3 vs 4) stall support. I expect the cabinet to be the same but some components may not be included to save cost. I suppose it all depends on how modular the innards are.

It will be telling if Tesla commits to solar arrays for these high latitude stations. Are there any indications, via permits or pictures, that the TCH sites might get solar?
 

XHabjab

Helping to end the ICE Age
Feb 25, 2018
642
1,344
Georgetown TX
Agreed--I think you've got it. I'm also curious to see if the TCH cabinets are marked or look different in any way signifying reduced (3 vs 4) stall support. I expect the cabinet to be the same but some components may not be included to save cost. I suppose it all depends on how modular the innards are.

It will be telling if Tesla commits to solar arrays for these high latitude stations. Are there any indications, via permits or pictures, that the TCH sites might get solar?
Popular but Incorrect belief that Northern latitudes get no sunlight. In fact the sun shines longer in the far north in the summer. Your solar array has to rotate though.

Winter, ummm yeah okay.
 

XHabjab

Helping to end the ICE Age
Feb 25, 2018
642
1,344
Georgetown TX
This area is actually pretty good - much better than parts of the Northeast and Mid-atlantic of the US.
DNI.png
That's a map of direct normal (90 degrees) irradiation, I assume year round. If the solar panels can rotate, the numbers are different. Proximity to mountains also seems to be an effect seen on this map. In the Great White North, with low horizon (no mountains), there is more insolation than the contiguous 48. In the summer.

Dumb point to argue about though. Let's move on.
 

Big Earl

bnkwupt
Supporting Member
Jul 12, 2017
5,954
11,245
Springfield, VA
Summer is where it matters most, since that’s when travel loads are highest. So far I haven’t seen any indication of solar being installed at TCH sites.
 
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PLUS EV

Running on Empty
Sep 16, 2016
6,686
10,931
Seattle
Popular but Incorrect belief that Northern latitudes get no sunlight. In fact the sun shines longer in the far north in the summer. Your solar array has to rotate though.

Winter, ummm yeah okay.
Shines longer but at a lower angle, so he was basically correct.

That being said, the Prairies are quite sunny in summer which is of course the busy summer driving season. So I wouldn't say that solar would be useless in these parts, but definitely not as valuable as in say, the desert southwest or something.
 
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SammichLover

Banned
Dec 8, 2018
2,618
1,651
Yup
Shines longer but at a lower angle, so he was basically correct.
The lower angle does add extra atmosphere in the way. However if you’re not particularly concerned about land footprint, that’s not a huge concern for utility installs.

Where it is an issue is if you intend to mount on a roof to use that as your superstructure. Most sloped residential roofs are going to be a very poor match for that latitude. For flat commercial roofs you’re normally going to mount on its own frame (unless you’re somewhere South of US mainland) anyway, but at those higher latitudes you run into issue of requiring a much larger footprint, so realistically you’re back on the ground.

Fortunately land prices are reasonable for usage like this through most of the Prairies.
 

PLUS EV

Running on Empty
Sep 16, 2016
6,686
10,931
Seattle
The lower angle does add extra atmosphere in the way. However if you’re not particularly concerned about land footprint, that’s not a huge concern for utility installs.

Where it is an issue is if you intend to mount on a roof to use that as your superstructure. Most sloped residential roofs are going to be a very poor match for that latitude. For flat commercial roofs you’re normally going to mount on its own frame (unless you’re somewhere South of US mainland) anyway, but at those higher latitudes you run into issue of requiring a much larger footprint, so realistically you’re back on the ground.

Fortunately land prices are reasonable for usage like this through most of the Prairies.
Sure any amount angle of the sun is fine if you are willing to install infi solar panels at extreme angles. But obviously there's a point where it isn't cost efficient.
 

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