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Supercharger Hwy 97 thru Central Oregon?

Discussion in 'Northwest' started by RMan, May 10, 2015.

  1. RMan

    RMan Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2015
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    Location:
    Central Oregon
    We will take delivery of a new 85D later this month (waiting is the worst part). Once or twice a year we make the trek into CA along Highway 97. Despite the best efforts of our sales consultant in Portland as new owners I guess we are suffering from range anxiety. Having learned so much reading these forums it's time to turn to the experts for advice:

    It's 236 miles with a 259 ft elevation gain from our home to the Mt Shasta Supercharger. The EV Planner says we are good, even with a full load and weather in the 20's. Any real world experience?

    The official Tesla Supercharger site seems to indicate a "coming soon" site along Hwy 97. It's very hard to tell if this will be in Bend, LaPine, or ? Any insight?

    THANKS.....counting the days!!!
     
  2. RyanT

    RyanT Member

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    #2 RyanT, May 10, 2015
    Last edited: May 10, 2015
    EV trip planner is usually pretty accurate. In my P85 I can do better than the rated 300kw/m when not on the interstate around here. Especially if you set it at 59 mph or something. You might think about getting the CHAdeMO. If the kw/mile is looking bad you could reroute to Medford. $450 is not adding that much to the price of the car and is definitly usefull here in the PNW with the AV network. They also seem to be building out more on the West Coast Electric highway as they've just added Brookings.
     
  3. roblab

    roblab Active Member

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    I live in Napa Valley and drive up to Ontario, Oregon, and beyond every now and then. We just came back from a run on Thursday, so this is recent, at least.

    We did this run in our early Signature, 71,000 miles, about 10% battery degradation. We start out from Shasta and head for Bend, where we stay at Riverhouse, which has HPWC chargers. You can pay $8 and top up while you eat, or whatever, and the run between Shasta SC and Riverhouse is 220 miles.

    As Oregon's speed limit is a nominal 55 mph, everyone goes 60 or less. On our way north, we made the run doing 65 in CA, and 60 in Oregon, and gained 20 miles of rated range buffer (left at 250 miles range for a 220 mile trip, arrived with 50 miles range). On the return trip it was high head winds and cold, some rain. Traffic was moving a little slower. We left Riverhouse with 240 miles rated range, and arrived at Shasta with 40 miles buffer, a gain of 20 miles again.

    The elevation from Shasta rises a few thousand feet through mountains up to Klamath , then levels off for a hundred miles across the plateau to La Pine area, then goes through more hills and down to Bend, so though the buffer looks bad on the plateau, the last leg of the trip coming down gives more buffer. Our center console trip advisor was telling us we had to slow down or find a charger, which we ignored carefully.

    The key is to put the car in cruise and keep your feet off the pedal. The second key is to refrain from using heat. A blanket or extra clothes, and driving gloves, preclude freezing to death, but heat sucks power tremendously, and unless you KNOW you've got extra, be careful. Sunshine warms the car nicely. It was 37 outside for many miles, but comfortable when the sun was out.

    Also, I had the address and phone numbers of RV parks in Klamath (Oregon 8 RV) and La Pine/Crescent (Big Pine RV) where people have charged before. There is also a Tesla HPWC south of Bend at Sunriver Lodge, out of the way some, and they charge you.

    I find it easier and quicker to cruise along relaxed and not need to spend my time waiting at a charger. We had a great trip. No reason why you can't make it. Before you start, see how much extra charge you have (Need 240, have 260, 20 miles of buffer) and try to keep it from going down too far. You will lose buffer going up out of Bend, but should pick up buffer going across the plateau, and pick up more headed down from Klamath to Shasta. If you keep losing buffer, you have to slow down, or call ahead for an hour charge at one of the RV parks (waste of time?)

    Start out max range. After you make this run a few times, you get the hang of it. Good Luck!!
     
  4. PhilBa

    PhilBa Active Member

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    I just looked at the SC map on the Tesla site. It doesn't show any "Coming soon" location near 97. I'm a little confused by your terminology since they switched to "Opening soon" a while ago. They do show a 2015 location somewhere in the Bend (ish) area but historically, Tesla's map locations have been only slightly better than random. Generally that means they may put a SC in that general area, or they may not. And, even when they do go in, timing is a coin toss. For the longest time last year they had an SC location coming to Hermiston, OR. But it went away and seems to be permanently gone. There have been lots of SCs that went in without any indication on the map. I think the map generally reflects a snap shot of the team's thinking at a point in time and doesn't really track it's evolution until they do another snap shot, many months later. Note that the 2015 map also shows a Tri-Cities SC location which makes some sense as Ellensburg to Pendelton is 170 miles and Walla Walla becomes "round trippable" from Portland and Seattle. It also makes The Dalles to Spokane doable. But, who knows if that's really going to happen.

    Anyway, my point is caution about expectations on SCs - mine have been dashed numerous times since I got my P85 2 years ago.

    You will find that range anxiety will subside after using your Model S for a while. Road tripping into the "hinterlands" is still a little dicey. Best bet is to have plan A, B and C and carry the broadest array of adapters you can get. Use PlugShare to find all your alternatives. Get the chademo adapter. Maybe even a dog bone for a welding outlet. Know your RV parks. Basically, you will never really be far from a charge of some sort. At worst case some kind soul will let you use a 120V outlet.

    For the run to the shasta charger, you could stop at the Sun Country Charger at OIT in Klamath Falls. 80 Amp and I think it's free.
     
  5. jarred767

    jarred767 Member

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    OP - Congrats on the new car! Theres not too many of them here in Central Oregon. I just moved here from Seattle where there were a ton and it's a little sad not seeing them much anymore. I don't have one yet, but plan to hopefully be a future owner of third generation (Model3??) Tesla.

    Sorry I can't be of more help with your specific question, but it sounds like you've got some good information here. I hope you get to have a blast with the new car!
     
  6. breser

    breser AutoPilot Nostradamus

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    Yes see here:
    Real World Comparison of a S85 to an 85D Efficiency - Page 8

    While EV Trip Planner has been very accurate for the older models I'd be real careful with the predictions from the 85D. My experience is that it is still often optimistic about what you can do. Going slower is going to help a ton (Oregon's slower speed limits should help a lot there). My above linked trip was fairly slow because a large section of that is through a highway that runs through the city as a regular street and the speed limits are much lower inside the park.

    Whatever you do turn on range mode on the car. This didn't seem to make much difference on the older cars (only seemed to adjust climate system behavior). But on the D vehicles it makes a dramatic difference in efficiency. I leave mine on pretty much full time now.
     
  7. napabill

    napabill Active Member

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    These are known as "Classics" not older models!
     
  8. PhilBa

    PhilBa Active Member

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    Hear Hear!!
     
  9. breser

    breser AutoPilot Nostradamus

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    I'm not sure that's really consistent with how people have been using "classic." The uses I've seen so far is vehicles without Autopilot. Obviously Autopilot has no relevance to what I was talking about since Autopilot or not doesn't change the range/efficiency of the vehicle. In the context of what I was saying you can replace older with RWD. I don't think all RWD cars are classics yet. Tesla is still making the RWD 85.

    I'll be more conscientious about how I label certain vehicles so as to avoid bruising some owners wounds in the future.
     
  10. RMan

    RMan Member

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    RESPECT. Those of us that have joined the Tesla Avalanche of late owe a huge debt to those that have already taken the leap. We justify our investment in Tesla stock and now our S85D as an investment in our grandchildren's future. Those that invested before us have blazed the trail. It's way too easy to worry about who has the latest technology and lose sight of the difficulties blazing the trail. Classics, early adapters, whatever are due the respect they have earned.
     

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