Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

Supercharger Siler City, NC

Big Earl

bnkwupt
Supporting Member
Jul 12, 2017
6,086
11,629
Springfield, VA
I stopped by this V3 supercharger on July 3 with my M3 at 42% SOC to charge. Stall 2D on the far end would only give me a constant 27 kW even after I gave it plenty of time to ramp up. When I switched to stall 1C it ramped up to 103 kW instead of what would normally be expected from a V3 supercharger charging up from 42% SOC (which would be around 155 kW). It basically acted like a V2 supercharger from that point on until it finished charging me up to 82%. I was the only car there. It looks to me like it needs some major adjustments and thorough testing.

Battery probably wasn’t warm enough upon arrival. 27 kW on 2D is definitely abnormal but 103 kW seems pretty reasonable for 42% if you hadn’t been driving for a while prior to charging.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mikes_fsd

mikes_fsd

Banned
May 23, 2014
2,562
2,687
Charlotte, NC
I stopped by this V3 supercharger on July 3 with my M3 at 42% SOC to charge. Stall 2D on the far end would only give me a constant 27 kW even after I gave it plenty of time to ramp up. When I switched to stall 1C it ramped up to 103 kW instead of what would normally be expected from a V3 supercharger charging up from 42% SOC (which would be around 155 kW). It basically acted like a V2 supercharger from that point on until it finished charging me up to 82%. I was the only car there. It looks to me like it needs some major adjustments and thorough testing.
Did you get charged for the session?
 

JW-NC

Member
Jul 4, 2021
5
8
Chapel Hill, NC
Battery probably wasn’t warm enough upon arrival. 27 kW on 2D is definitely abnormal but 103 kW seems pretty reasonable for 42% if you hadn’t been driving for a while prior to charging.
Battery was definitely warm enough - I had just driven to this supercharger from Roanoke VA and it was 82° outside. The reason I thought 103 kW was not reasonable is that I typically get 128 kW at 42% on a V2 charger, and this is a V3 charger. A V3 charger should normally give you in the neighborhood of 155 kW at 42% SOC.
 

JW-NC

Member
Jul 4, 2021
5
8
Chapel Hill, NC
Battery probably wasn’t warm enough upon arrival. 27 kW on 2D is definitely abnormal but 103 kW seems pretty reasonable for 42% if you hadn’t been driving for a while prior to charging.
Actually, maybe the battery was too warm. I had trouble getting the Navigator to navigate to that supercharger, so the car didn't know to "prepare the battery for supercharging" as it normally does. I checked the Navigator just now and it does now show the Siler City supercharger as a destination.
 
  • Informative
Reactions: mikes_fsd

JW-NC

Member
Jul 4, 2021
5
8
Chapel Hill, NC
My above experience at the new Siler City Supercharger brings up the question, What exactly is the car doing to "prepare the battery for supercharging" as it navigates to the supercharger? The manual says, "Model 3 pre-heats the Battery to ensure when you arrive at the Supercharger, the battery temperature is optimal and ready to charge. This reduces the amount of time it takes to charge." But it doesn't say what that optimal temperature is, although some older information from Tesla says their battery management system normally tries to keep the battery below 95°F (35°C) and tries to keep its lifetime average at 77°F (25°C).

However, the situation is different when DC Fast Charging the battery, since the battery does charge faster at higher temperatures. There's another TMC forum discussion here called "How hot should the batteries get while charging?" with a comment from Zoomit that says, "The target temperature for On Route Battery Warmup is 40°C (104°F), based on a comment by a Tesla engineer at the V3 Supercharger test station when it first opened in Fremont. I think the battery will charge at max rate when that temp has been reached..."
For that long discussion see: How hot should the batteries get while charging?

But once the car reaches the above "target temperature" of 40°C to allow faster charging and is hooked up to the Supercharger, the car's battery management system will try to keep the battery temperature below 45°C (113°F) as the DC Fast Charging by itself heats up the battery. Once the battery temperature gets to 45°C during the DC Fast Charging, the Supercharger will then begin to reduce charging power significantly. For more on that see: Watch Tesla's battery thermal management in action while Supercharging

To summarize, for fastest charging at a Supercharger, the car's battery temperature should be close to 104°F (which the car will try to take care of automatically if you navigate there), but if it's a hot day and the battery temperature gets up to 113°F, your Supercharger will reduce your charging power at that point. If it's a cool/cold day and you don't navigate to the Supercharger, which means you could arrive with a battery temperature much below 104°F, you will get reduced charging power.
 
  • Informative
Reactions: DavidAsheville

RTPEV

Active Member
Mar 21, 2016
1,110
1,300
Durham, NC
My above experience at the new Siler City Supercharger brings up the question, What exactly is the car doing to "prepare the battery for supercharging" as it navigates to the supercharger? The manual says, "Model 3 pre-heats the Battery to ensure when you arrive at the Supercharger, the battery temperature is optimal and ready to charge. This reduces the amount of time it takes to charge." But it doesn't say what that optimal temperature is, although some older information from Tesla says their battery management system normally tries to keep the battery below 95°F (35°C) and tries to keep its lifetime average at 77°F (25°C).

However, the situation is different when DC Fast Charging the battery, since the battery does charge faster at higher temperatures. There's another TMC forum discussion here called "How hot should the batteries get while charging?" with a comment from Zoomit that says, "The target temperature for On Route Battery Warmup is 40°C (104°F), based on a comment by a Tesla engineer at the V3 Supercharger test station when it first opened in Fremont. I think the battery will charge at max rate when that temp has been reached..."
For that long discussion see: How hot should the batteries get while charging?

But once the car reaches the above "target temperature" of 40°C to allow faster charging and is hooked up to the Supercharger, the car's battery management system will try to keep the battery temperature below 45°C (113°F) as the DC Fast Charging by itself heats up the battery. Once the battery temperature gets to 45°C during the DC Fast Charging, the Supercharger will then begin to reduce charging power significantly. For more on that see: Watch Tesla's battery thermal management in action while Supercharging

To summarize, for fastest charging at a Supercharger, the car's battery temperature should be close to 104°F (which the car will try to take care of automatically if you navigate there), but if it's a hot day and the battery temperature gets up to 113°F, your Supercharger will reduce your charging power at that point. If it's a cool/cold day and you don't navigate to the Supercharger, which means you could arrive with a battery temperature much below 104°F, you will get reduced charging power.

And all this, while off-topic for this thread, is why it would be SO useful to have a display in the car that indicates what power the car is commanding versus what it's getting from the Supercharger. Yes, I doubt Tesla would ever want to provide that data as it makes visible the fact that the car is not really always capable of the charge speeds that are advertised (today you can just easily blame the Supercharger and not the car). But whether it's the car or the Supercharger, it still leaves a bad taste in the mouth of a driver that doesn't understand all the complexities of what's going on and is perplexed at the slow charging rates. Even if specific numbers were not given, but rather simple reasons: charging limited by Supercharger; charging limited by battery temp; charging limited by state of charge
 
  • Like
Reactions: BrownOuttaSpec

Products we're discussing on TMC...

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top