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Supercharging fee Rates and the Model 3

Discussion in 'Model 3' started by TehDoak, Jul 30, 2017.

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  1. TehDoak

    TehDoak Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2016
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    Location:
    Northeast PA
    So, for this example, I'll use the Model 3 Long Range and State of PA

    Supercharging

    Currently, in PA, they charge .10 per minute when the charge is below 60 kW, and .20 per minute above 60 kW

    So, with the long range, 310 Miles, and your standard charge is around 90%. Assuming the battery is 70kWH, 90% is 63 kWH with a range of 279 Miles. If I put around 200 Miles per week on the car, from a 90% charge, that would be 79 miles left.

    I pull up to the super charger, 1st 30 minutes takes me to 249 miles and would cost $3

    With a 70 kWH battery at 100%, 249 miles...that'd put you at 56kWH. Assuming the rate will drop as you get closer to full, lets say 10 minutes to get the final 30 miles, around 1/2 of which would be over 60 kWH. So, 5 minutes under 60 kW, 5 minutes above. Or, $1.50

    So, $4.50

    So, a weekly recharge at a super charger would be 40 minutes and cost $4.50. Does that seem correct? Am I off in how I'm calculating this? Any unrealistic expectations, etc?

    (before the people come and tell me I should charge at home, my wife and I are living in a townhouse and are moving twice for her fellowship in the next 2 years, so we may or may not have access to a home outlet. Once we own our own place, I'll have a high speed charger installed)
     
  2. SlyWombat

    SlyWombat Member

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    You will be better off looking around where you work and charge during the day if you dont have any plugs at home.
     
  3. cpa

    cpa Active Member

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    I think, but am not certain, that the 20-cent charge for more than 60kWh and the 10-cent charge for less than 60kWh has to do with the current, not the quantity you receive.

    For example, you pull into the Supercharger with 10% battery. The first 20 minutes you receive a current >= 60kWh of electricity. You are charged $4.00. In the twenty-first minute the current drops to <60kWh, and you remain plugged in for another 15 minutes. You are charged a buck-fifty for those fifteen minutes. Total charge = $5.50, regardless of the amount of charge added to your battery.

    Put another way, if the maximum current that you receive upon plugging in is 50kWh, then your entire session will be billed to you at a dime per minute. If it takes 48 minutes to attain the same state of charge under this second scenario as you would have under the first scenario, your cost under the second scenario would be $4.80 instead of $5.50.

    This pricing scheme tries to take into consideration two factors: The first factor is that stalls are paired, and the second to plug in frequently receives a significantly reduced current until the first to charge starts to taper. The second factor is that some Superchargers experience external issues that reduce charging speed.
     
  4. TexasEV

    TexasEV Well-Known Member

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    Y'all are confusing kW and kWh. The pricing is per kWh in states that allow it. In states that don't, time is used as a proxy for energy delivered, with tiers of >60kW power and <60 kW power because more energy is delivered per minute when the power is higher.
     
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  5. TehDoak

    TehDoak Member

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    Location:
    Northeast PA
    Ah that makes sense. So its the rate that is delivered, not the state of the battery.

    Thanks!
     
  6. ArizonaP85

    ArizonaP85 Member

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    Please don't confuse residential electric rates with commercial which have a very high demand component. Without some special provision (which I think would be very hard/impossible to get due to state-based regulations), Tesla's Supercharger electricity cost will be several times higher to charge than you charging at home.

    If Tesla only charges its actual cost for electricity, and nothing for its capital cost for the supercharger station or on-going maintenance costs, it will still have to charge several times your estimates.

    That is still in-line with its statements that filling up with the Supercharger will be less than filling a tank of fuel with premium gas.

    Sorry to be Donnie Downer, but this reality check is not Tesla's fault; it is all due to the very high demand component of commercial electricity rates.
     
  7. 3PHASE

    3PHASE 3PHASE

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    Location:
    Waldorf, MD
    Still cheaper than eVgo.
     

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