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Supercharging kills Model Y A/C

Apologies if this has been discussed elsewhere, but I did search and did not find anyone else who reported this problem. While supercharging in Barstow my A/C suddenly stopped blowing cold air. No amount of soft/hard resets, deep sleeps etc could fix it so we suffered the rest of the 6 hour drive in ~100 degree temps to our destination in AZ. After a night’s sleep it was back to working, but sure as $#!+ on the drive back home 5 days later, the same thing happened during our 2nd supercharge. Another miserable drive through the desert with no A/C! I have a service appt but wondered if this has happened to anyone else? Any way to ensure the SC correctly diagnoses and fixes the issue, assuming it is back to “working” by the time I bring it in?
 
Apologies if this has been discussed elsewhere, but I did search and did not find anyone else who reported this problem. While supercharging in Barstow my A/C suddenly stopped blowing cold air. No amount of soft/hard resets, deep sleeps etc could fix it so we suffered the rest of the 6 hour drive in ~100 degree temps to our destination in AZ. After a night’s sleep it was back to working, but sure as $#!+ on the drive back home 5 days later, the same thing happened during our 2nd supercharge. Another miserable drive through the desert with no A/C! I have a service appt but wondered if this has happened to anyone else? Any way to ensure the SC correctly diagnoses and fixes the issue, assuming it is back to “working” by the time I bring it in?
You might need to provide date and time of when you did super charging and when AC came back online (just guessing, but I'm sure it would help).

What SW version are you running?
 
Also how low were you when you stopped for supercharging?
I believe Camp mode turns off below 20%. This could be an issue with any high tech (aka software control) car, where a flag is not properly initialized or some condition is triggered and how to clear it is not immediately known. Would be interested in hearing what the service appt tells you.
 
Hello! I had a similar issue with supercharging, Georgia summer heat, and no A/C with my 2019 Model 3. On a trip to Florida last year, we stopped at a supercharger. We had picked up food to eat in the car while waiting for the car to charge. After charigng for ten or so minutes, the A/C stopped working. We had to get out of the car to finish eating while the car finished charging. While not as extreme as your over night issue, it did take about 10-15 minutes of driving before the A/C came back. The same situation happened on the way back from Florida. I never had it checked out, but assumed it was some sort of safety measure to prevent battery overheating. With all this being said, I am also interested in the information you learn from your service appt.

In case your are wondering, I am following the Model Y posts because we have one on order and will officially be a two Tesla household.
 

Pianewman

2021 MYLR VIN 88,XXX, Rd/Wh, 12/20 delivery
Supporting Member
Oct 28, 2020
1,980
1,580
Fort Worth
There have been HVAC failures, so this failure while supercharging may be purely coincidental. What's your VIN? When did you purchase? Tesla hasn't announced if there was a specific VIN range that has been affected, but they are proactively replacing HVAC parts in certain regions.
 
Did the 465 backup system work for you at least?
I apologize but I am not familiar with that..?
There have been HVAC failures, so this failure while supercharging may be purely coincidental. What's your VIN? When did you purchase? Tesla hasn't announced if there was a specific VIN range that has been affected, but they are proactively replacing HVAC parts in certain regions.

My sample size is only 2 but I am pretty convinced by the circumstances that it was not coincidental. VIN 5YJYGxxxxxx023347. Delivered July 2019.
 
I reported two instances of weak/warm AC on our Model S (once while driving uphill and another time during moderate acceleration to merge onto highway). Neither situations were very extreme but Service Center analyzed logs and said it is normal behavior based on whether or not additional cooling is needed by the battery. Both days were pretty hot 95 or 100 degree days. The AC resumed normal cooling 10-15 minutes later, both times.

Hate to say it but it could be normal for OP. Fast Supercharging combined with hot day probably taxed the cooling system and Tesla prioritizes battery comfort over human comfort.
 
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DrComputer

TeslaClubLA President
Jan 29, 2009
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Sherman Oaks, CA
This has happened to me before too while driving in Palm Springs in 110+ temperatures and SuperCharging in my Model X. Since I was on my way into Palm Springs I stopped by the service center (while the AC was still blowing hot air). They pulled logs and let the car sit for a while and the AC started to work again and they said the logs didn't show anything wrong, but that they've seen this behavior before on very hot days while SuperCharging. I suspect that because of the cooling demands in high temperatures that the car trips some sort of thermal switch killing the compressor until the systems can cool down a bit.
 
I can 100% believe the car cares more about the battery temperature than our squishy human bodies.... but for six hours? If the system just stopped working during a supercharger and maybe 10 to 20 minutes after, sure. It’s the fact that hours after the event to car still wasn’t able to blow cold.

Maybe it just needed to be parked and started again like 20 minutes after the supercharger event, but that doesn’t strike me as how that HVAC system would have been designed.
 
This has happened to me before too while driving in Palm Springs in 110+ temperatures and SuperCharging in my Model X. Since I was on my way into Palm Springs I stopped by the service center (while the AC was still blowing hot air). They pulled logs and let the car sit for a while and the AC started to work again and they said the logs didn't show anything wrong, but that they've seen this behavior before on very hot days while SuperCharging. I suspect that because of the cooling demands in high temperatures that the car trips some sort of thermal switch killing the compressor until the systems can cool down a bit.
On 4/24/20 in my old model s after it returned from the same service center I encountered a similar problem and these were the codes it gave me. It was already hot in the desert and even though it was 10pm at night it was still about 90f outside. I noticed my car temp rising over 103f supposedly inside but didn’t feel like this reflected the inside cabin temp as I had the windows down. You could definitely hear the cooling system divert cooling to the battery and supercharging system rather than blow cold air in the cabin.

my problems were caused by a corroded or water damaged plug in front bumper/cooling area that wasn’t reconnected properly by service after its last service visit that let water get into the wiring. Service had to replace some bit of wiring to fix my case since it was their fault they didn’t reconnect it right after I had to have them replace some louvers and radiators after my so struck a hard tumble weed by accident which punctured my ac system. Under insurance they had to replace a bunch of cooling parts, fog light, and paint the bumper the first time to fix the ac. It worked until I began supercharging and they discovered their error.

EB85006E-B13A-4ABD-B489-778FBE8DDE48.png
 

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Probably an error code or out of range reading from sensor getting triggered, that blocks HVAC. There was a similar thing this past winter which led to no heat. Doing a hard reset might get your AC back sooner, but you would have to wait long enough after charging for things to cool back down a bit for it to work. Perhaps drive 15 minutes after charging then try the reset...?
 
I agree that the car is may be behaving as designed. If the battery needs the AC the octovalve delivers. The heat exchanger for the cabin may be getting some cooling, but not enough to feel cool.

I suppose Tesla could add an cabin AC priority option where the charge rate is reduced under these conditions.
 
Probably an error code or out of range reading from sensor getting triggered, that blocks HVAC. There was a similar thing this past winter which led to no heat. Doing a hard reset might get your AC back sooner, but you would have to wait long enough after charging for things to cool back down a bit for it to work. Perhaps drive 15 minutes after charging then try the reset...?

I tried multiple hard resets; I tried letting it deep sleep; nothing worked

I agree that the car is may be behaving as designed. If the battery needs the AC the octovalve delivers. The heat exchanger for the cabin may be getting some cooling, but not enough to feel cool.

I suppose Tesla could add an cabin AC priority option where the charge rate is reduced under these conditions.

Several hours after completing the supercharge, I still had no A/C...in 100+ weather. To me that is a safety issue. If Tesla tries to tell me this is by design and can’t/won’t fix it I would almost certainly invoke lemon law on the vehicle. As much as I love it, that’s just not acceptable behavior for a car.
 
I tried multiple hard resets; I tried letting it deep sleep; nothing worked



Several hours after completing the supercharge, I still had no A/C...in 100+ weather. To me that is a safety issue. If Tesla tries to tell me this is by design and can’t/won’t fix it I would almost certainly invoke lemon law on the vehicle. As much as I love it, that’s just not acceptable behavior for a car.

Absolutely not, further, unless the AC was running the whole time cooling the battery, that could also mean that the battery might not get AC for that following hour... if you're driving hard (up a mountain, freeway speeds, etc) in 100F and no active cooling, the battery might get into temperatures that aren't safe for it. No way Tesla designed a car that could damage it's own battery in 100F.

Again, I could see while plugged in at 200kW supercharging you might have some or all of the AC capacity diverted to the battery, but the compressor should still be funning and fans at full. Maybe even at 70% when you're only doing 50kW or something because that's a huge amount of battery mass to cool, BUT, I would think within 5 minutes of unplugging some amount or all of the AC should be able to go back to the cabin. 100% 20 minutes or longer and it should be back to normal. If the car must be stopped and started again or reset in this event to "turn on" AC again, that's a huge design fault and I would think everyone in SoCal, AZ, Texas would be having this issue all July/August.

This is an issue and not normal. Either bad AC (maybe not full capacity and thus can't actually cool the battery down again after supercharging if you keep driving), bad sensors, or air in the lines maybe?
 

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