Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

Sweet spot for Wheel & Tire Combo for the Y

N1L CO2

Member
Jul 10, 2020
451
284
OC, CA
I think I may have just found the sweet spot for wheel/tire combo for the Y. I've been a bad boy with the go-pedal on the Y ever since I got it. I got aftermarket 20x9.5 wheels with Pirelli summer tires put on almost immediately after delivery. Well, that was 9000 miles ago and the tires are now shot. 😁

When I was shopping for new tires, I thought I'd try a slightly wider width which would also yield a slightly higher side wall which would then yield a slightly more compliant ride. So, I decided to go with a set of 265/40/20s instead of the factory spec 255/40/20. Wow, what a difference!! Not only do I have more surface contact on the pavement, I can feel the difference in ride quality. Not to mention the fact that it seems to fill the wheel wells a lot better too! I am stoked!!

Here's the math. The new tires have 10mm wider tread and are only 4mm taller than stock. But that slight increase in size also yields in additional volume where it would be occupied with more air thus definitely helping with the more compliant ride. I am never going back to the factory size again!
 
  • Like
Reactions: everydaychris

Stavinski

Member
Jan 31, 2021
112
123
USA
My guess is you’re never going to see an automobile manufacturer allow speedometer adjustment for tire size. Maybe,
Maybe the service center would be allowed to do it but I doubt it. Many would immediately switch to the smallest setting to save the indicated mileage.
 

Orca42

New Member
Apr 11, 2021
1
0
Connecticut
It would probably be best if the speedometer would be calculated daily based on using the GPS speed as a control. FYI: Open up the Waze app and see the difference in speed if you ever change tire size and calculate the difference.
 

pt19713

Member
Feb 5, 2020
989
1,275
Delaware
The 255/45/19 and 255/40/20 causes the speedo to be about 1 mph faster than the actual speed, so at 65 mph, the speedo will display 64. You can confirm this with any GPS app (ie Waze, Google Maps, etc). The new size might correct the discrepancy.
 

Pianewman

Active Member
Oct 28, 2020
1,395
943
Fort Worth
I think I may have just found the sweet spot for wheel/tire combo for the Y. I've been a bad boy with the go-pedal on the Y ever since I got it. I got aftermarket 20x9.5 wheels with Pirelli summer tires put on almost immediately after delivery. Well, that was 9000 miles ago and the tires are now shot. 😁

When I was shopping for new tires, I thought I'd try a slightly wider width which would also yield a slightly higher side wall which would then yield a slightly more compliant ride. So, I decided to go with a set of 265/40/20s instead of the factory spec 255/40/20. Wow, what a difference!! Not only do I have more surface contact on the pavement, I can feel the difference in ride quality. Not to mention the fact that it seems to fill the wheel wells a lot better too! I am stoked!!

Here's the math. The new tires have 10mm wider tread and are only 4mm taller than stock. But that slight increase in size also yields in additional volume where it would be occupied with more air thus definitely helping with the more compliant ride. I am never going back to the factory size again!
Are you sure the change in ride quality isn't caused by new (thicker, softer) rubber at all corners? Did you change tire brands, as well?

I'm trying real hard to believe that your perception of "ride quality" (whatever that means???) is based on the tire size change.
 

iaonbb

Member
Jul 21, 2018
77
31
Mile High
I have been mulling this over for months. The 9.5 in wheel really limits your tire options. Wasn't sure how much of a difference 1% increase would make visually. I'm looking for something that fills the wheel well out a bit more. Would love to see some pics for comparison...

Guessing that Tesla did not use this tire size due to the increased contact patch and reduced range. Also far fewer tire choices with the 265.

Anyone know if a 275 will fit? I Heard it might rub up front but this has not been confirmed...
 

kashian

Member
Jan 4, 2021
74
41
San Diego
I think I may have just found the sweet spot for wheel/tire combo for the Y. I've been a bad boy with the go-pedal on the Y ever since I got it. I got aftermarket 20x9.5 wheels with Pirelli summer tires put on almost immediately after delivery. Well, that was 9000 miles ago and the tires are now shot. 😁

When I was shopping for new tires, I thought I'd try a slightly wider width which would also yield a slightly higher side wall which would then yield a slightly more compliant ride. So, I decided to go with a set of 265/40/20s instead of the factory spec 255/40/20. Wow, what a difference!! Not only do I have more surface contact on the pavement, I can feel the difference in ride quality. Not to mention the fact that it seems to fill the wheel wells a lot better too! I am stoked!!

Here's the math. The new tires have 10mm wider tread and are only 4mm taller than stock. But that slight increase in size also yields in additional volume where it would be occupied with more air thus definitely helping with the more compliant ride. I am never going back to the factory size again!
Do you inflate the new tires to the same pressure as the OEM tires? Just curious...
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
3,274
3,261
Maryland
You always inflate tires to their own specific tire specs. If not, then you may be over or under inflating which can induce premature wear.
Just want to note that the tire pressure number (PSI) shown on the sidewall of the tire is the maximum tire pressure, not the recommended tire pressure. The Model Y tires are specified as XL load tires. XL tire load ratings are based on a tire pressure of 41 PSI. (Standard passenger vehicle tire load ratings are based on a tire pressure of 35 PSI.)

Always refer to the vehicle manufacturer's sticker that is on the side of the B pillar by the driver's seat for the recommended tire pressure (this is the tire pressure in PSI when the tires are cold, not after the vehicle has been driven.) Setting the tire pressure higher or lower by a few pounds should not create undo tread wear. After experimenting with different tire pressure settings I prefer the ride of my Model Y with the 19" wheels and Continental tires set to 43 to 44 PSI.
 

Pianewman

Active Member
Oct 28, 2020
1,395
943
Fort Worth
^^^this...
...except, with the uneven concrete slab surfaces around DFW, 42psi, which is Tesla's figure, is just...too...harsh. I've reduced to 38psi cold, which rises to 41-42 in 75f ambient after driving. I'll be checking again when temps climb into the 90s for the duration of the summer.
I'm carefully checking for excess tire wear, but not terribly concerned, as I'm looking forward to replacing the 19" Conti tires. Hoping the pricey BridgestoneQuietTrack tires will be more forgiving.
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
3,274
3,261
Maryland
^^^this...
...except, with the uneven concrete slab surfaces around DFW, 42psi, which is Tesla's figure, is just...too...harsh. I've reduced to 38psi cold, which rises to 41-42 in 75f ambient after driving. I'll be checking again when temps climb into the 90s for the duration of the summer.
I'm carefully checking for excess tire wear, but not terribly concerned, as I'm looking forward to replacing the 19" Conti tires. Hoping the pricey BridgestoneQuietTrack tires will be more forgiving.
I've found that the ride of my Model Y is improved with the OE Continental tires inflated to 43/44 PSI. It seems counterintuitive but raising the tire pressure by 1 to 2 PSI results in a slightly softer, more cushioned ride.
 

Pianewman

Active Member
Oct 28, 2020
1,395
943
Fort Worth
I found that the suspension in my LR Model Y is a little less firm after almost 3k miles.
Agreed, with the emphasis on "a little". HAHA!

So, I just bumped up to 44psi, 70f ambient. I drove over a dime, and while I couldn't actual tell what the DATE was, I could tell it was heads up!!

I don't remember where you are in MD, but I lived in the DC region from 1959 until 2014. I long for the ribbon smooth stretches of asphalt in various regions in MD. I know MD spends a TON on their highways (my BIL recently retired, was a landscape designer/installer for the state). Texas? Mostly concrete, which is a tedious, expensive install, lasts decades w/o much maintenance, but by then, the slabs have shifted enough (memories of PA Turnpike) to make the ride miserable. Add the exposed aggregate surface into the mix, and I'm now more convinced of the need for adjustable coilovers, and softer tires.

This is yet another example of regional differences/needs. TX vs. ME vs. WA vs. SoCal? All are vastly different.

Ugh...$$$.
 
Last edited:
  • Funny
Reactions: rypalmer

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
3,274
3,261
Maryland
Agreed, with the emphasis on "a little". HAHA!

So, I just bumped up to 44psi, 70f ambient. I drove over a dime, and while I couldn't actual tell what the DATE was, I could tell it was heads up!!

I don't remember where you are in MD, but I lived in the DC region from 1959 until 2014. I long for the ribbon smooth stretches of asphalt in various regions in MD. I know MD spends a TON on their highways (my BIL recently retired, was a landscape designer/installer for the state). Texas? Mostly concrete, which is a tedious, expensive install, lasts decades w/o much maintenance, but by then, the slabs have shifted enough (memories of PA Turnpike) to make the ride miserable. Add the exposed aggregate surface into the mix, and I'm now more convinced of the need for adjustable coilovers, and softer tires.

This is yet another example of regional differences/needs. TX vs. ME vs. WA vs. SoCal? All are vastly different.

Ugh...$$$.
Actually I rarely drive on any of the highways, parkways any more since I am retired. 99% of my driving in my Model Y has been local streets at speeds under 50 MPH. Plenty of uneven road surfaces, pot holes and construction patches to make for less than a smooth ride. If the ride at 44 PSI is not to your liking then try 43 PSI. In my experience somewhere between 43 and 44 PSI is a smoother ride to be had than at the recommended 42 PSI.
 

Products we're discussing on TMC...

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top