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T-Sportline TSS wheels for 2022 Model S

As much as I like the looks of the Arachnid 21" wheels, I've had staggered low profile sport wheels/tires on other cars in the past and regretted it due to rim damage on potholes, curb rash, uneven tire wear (esp on the rear tires.) So, I ordered the '19 Tempest wheels for my 2022 LR (not built yet) but I know I'm not the first person who thinks they are ugly. I'm aware the covers can be removed, which helps somewhat, but still not excited about the look.

The T-Sportline options look interesting, specifically the 19" and 20" inch TSS wheels.

The 19" option includes 9.5inch width rims for the front and the rear. (Whereas the tempest wheels are 9.5" (front) and 10.5" (rear)). The T-Sportline website claims the original tires that came with the tempest wheels can be used on the back and front, but the wheel width is an inch different on the rears, so may be an odd fit. There is a +35 offset on the TSS wheels, but the Tempest offset is +40 on the front and +45 on the rear. I have to wonder if the rear wheels will look substantially different with different offsets while also being an inch narrower.

The 20" option is 10" and the idea is to use 10" on the front and the rear axles. The offset in both cases is 35 for the TSS wheels, whereas the Tempests were 40/45. It seems like these are likely to be closer to the fit of the original tempests, and a square 10inch set up has advantages for rotation/even tire wear.

I am new to using aftermarket wheels, and I have a few questions for anyone who has experience on this:

- Do the offset and width differences matter?
- I've read that Telsa doesn't have a system calibration for 20" wheels, does that matter?
- Should I expect issues with the tire pressure sensors, or is T-Sportline quality/compatibility typically good?
- Any direct experience with the TSS 19" and 20" wheels on the refresh model S?
- Am I asking for trouble with warranty?
- How much more tire noise should I expect more tire noise with the 20" vs. the 19"?

If anyone has an installer in the SF Bay area they like for aftermarket wheels for Tesla's who could manage all of this and get it right please let me know.
 
I have had the 20" TTS wheels on my 2016 P90D since it was new. I actually had the wheels before I even got the car. I installed factory TPS's and had a set of Michelin tires installed on the wheels too before the car arrived. Went to my local tire shop and had them put on the car and sold the factory tires and wheels in no time at all.
 
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I have had the 20" TTS wheels on my 2016 P90D since it was new. I actually had the wheels before I even got the car. I installed factory TPS's and had a set of Michelin tires installed on the wheels too before the car arrived. Went to my local tire shop and had them put on the car and sold the factory tires and wheels in no time at all.
Thanks. I’m still not sure about changing from a staggered set up (9.5 and 10.5) to a square set-up from a driving and appearance standpoint. Also also it seems in the 19 inch option that the rear original tires wont fit the new wheels properly! T-sportline seems to suggesting that it’s ok, but I have to wonder.

Are there other wheel companies who provide 9.5 and 10.5 wheels that would fit the original tires, and that have offsets an tire pressure sensors that are compatible with the 2022 model S?
 
The first thing I do whenever I buy a car that has 21's on it is to pull those off and replace them with 19's. Often something from TSportline. They're lighter, ride better, get better efficiency and offer more tire options at lower prices. They don't look quite as cool but are far better fair daily livability in just about every measurable way.
 
The first thing I do whenever I buy a car that has 21's on it is to pull those off and replace them with 19's. Often something from TSportline. They're lighter, ride better, get better efficiency and offer more tire options at lower prices. They don't look quite as cool but are far better fair daily livability in just about every measurable way.
Thanks, I am leaning towards the T-Sportline TSS wheels which are 10x20 inch. Those seem like the "just right" option. It appears the 10x20s are close enough to the original wheel and tire dimensions and allow a square set-up for rotation. But I am a newbie on modified offsets, diameters etc... so hope I'm not making a mistake.

Have you seen or heard of issues with warranty for the vehicle with after market wheels? For example, if I had issues with axles, motors, suspension or brakes, would Tesla contend that the modified wheels if they didn't match the original wheel parameters were to blame?
 
Thanks, I am leaning towards the T-Sportline TSS wheels which are 10x20 inch. Those seem like the "just right" option. It appears the 10x20s are close enough to the original wheel and tire dimensions and allow a square set-up for rotation. But I am a newbie on modified offsets, diameters etc... so hope I'm not making a mistake.

Have you seen or heard of issues with warranty for the vehicle with after market wheels? For example, if I had issues with axles, motors, suspension or brakes, would Tesla contend that the modified wheels if they didn't match the original wheel parameters were to blame?
Keep in mind that the TSportline 20" wheels for Model S are also rated for the Model X which is a heaver vehicle.

This means that the 20" wheels are quite a bit heavier than you would think due to needing to be able to handle the added stress of the Model X. The 19" wheels are only made for the Model S. If you look at the weight figures of the same model wheel across 19, 20 and 21 you'll find that the 20in version isn't halfway between those two in terms of weight like you may expect. It skews much closer than the 21in wheels... all things being equal.

As for warranty, just keep in mind that if you are denied warranty work due to a modification that the onus is on the manufacturer to prove that your modification caused the failure. Putting aftermarket wheels on your car doesn't automatically void your warranty. It could potentially make your warranty voidable but that's a big difference in legal terms. The odds of you being denied warranty work on axles, motors or suspension due to aftermarket wheels is next to zero.
 
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Hayseed_MS

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Thanks, I am leaning towards the T-Sportline TSS wheels which are 10x20 inch. Those seem like the "just right" option. It appears the 10x20s are close enough to the original wheel and tire dimensions and allow a square set-up for rotation. But I am a newbie on modified offsets, diameters etc... so hope I'm not making a mistake.

Have you seen or heard of issues with warranty for the vehicle with after market wheels? For example, if I had issues with axles, motors, suspension or brakes, would Tesla contend that the modified wheels if they didn't match the original wheel parameters were to blame?

My OEM wheels are the 21" ones. Love the looks, ride, handling, etc. No issues or dents with approx. 23k miles on them collectively. For the winter I put a set of TS5 wheels with 285/35r20 Pilot Sport All Season on it. Did great in the snow, etc. This set-up saved a bit of weight but not enough to notice. The 20" rode marginally better than the 21 but the 20 were noisier and less range. Had them on for approx 17k miles. Will go back on with this winter again.

Tesla worked on the car a few times with the 20" on there and I specifically asked if there were any issues and they said no - it all looked good.
 
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The 19" wheels are only made for the Model S. If you look at the weight figures of the same model wheel across 19, 20 and 21 you'll find that the 20in version isn't halfway between those two in terms of weight like you may expect. It skews much closer than the 21in wheels... all things being equal.
Thanks, the 19" are lighter for sure. T-Sportline claims their 19" TSS tires can accommodate the original OEM tires which are 255s on the front and 285s on teh back, and the were originally meant for 9.5" rims on the front and 10.5" rims on the back, but the T-Sportline TSS rims are 9.5" square. Any idea of that it's copasetic to put 285s on a 9.5" rim?
 
Thanks, the 19" are lighter for sure. T-Sportline claims their 19" TSS tires can accommodate the original OEM tires which are 255s on the front and 285s on teh back, and the were originally meant for 9.5" rims on the front and 10.5" rims on the back, but the T-Sportline TSS rims are 9.5" square. Any idea of that it's copasetic to put 285s on a 9.5" rim?
No idea on the new car's wheel & tire widths as I don't have one so I haven't researched that topic at all. Being as I buy used cars (I let others take that depreciation hit) check back with me in about 4 years. ;-)
 
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