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Teebone avoidance

Jayfarr

Member
Aug 7, 2020
7
1
Coos Bay
A friend of mine is very interested in buying a model 3. Recently his son-in-law‘s father pulled out in front of traffic on Highway 101 near Coos Bay Oregon, and was T-boned by a car. The question is whether a model 3 without full auto driving would have prevented the accident. Or whether a fully automatic car in full automatic mode would have prevented that sort of accident.
 

jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Nov 28, 2018
7,680
8,458
Riverside Co. CA
Not unless or until we have fully self driving cars with basically the ability for a person to sit in the back seat... so no, not now, and not soon.
 

AlanSubie4Life

Efficiency Obsessed Member
Oct 22, 2018
9,253
11,064
San Diego
A friend of mine is very interested in buying a model 3. Recently his son-in-law‘s father pulled out in front of traffic on Highway 101 near Coos Bay Oregon, and was T-boned by a car. The question is whether a model 3 without full auto driving would have prevented the accident. Or whether a fully automatic car in full automatic mode would have prevented that sort of accident.

Here is what to expect when driving a Tesla, with the way things operate currently (these are all recent events on close to the latest software).
https://twitter.com/greentheonly/status/1361726048573009920?s=21

https://twitter.com/greentheonly/status/1361458106077761538?s=21

https://twitter.com/greentheonly/status/1361372355751251968?s=21

All of these cars were likely total losses (otherwise the video would likely not have been obtained), which is surprising for one of them which seemed minor (probably very high salvage value). Looks like the driver was ok in all cases but none of the collisions were a classic t-bone collision (in the worst collision, the driver saved likely saved his life (or at least health) by his last second braking).

You can see in one of the videos that the car did actually identify the cross traffic, from the overlay. So there is, perhaps, potential (we will see). However, at the current time, action from the vehicle is not guaranteed, and I am not even sure whether it is even intended to do anything, typically. I don’t believe this sort of avoidance is specifically described anywhere in the owners manual.

I’m sure avoidance of cross traffic could be done with greater sensitivity with the existing sensors, but the issue would be false positives (specificity). There is also the question of what to do specifically to avoid the collision (all of these could have been prevented by stopping).

Any such feature, if implemented in the future, I would expect to work in cars both with and without FSD (assuming the same hardware).
 
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