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Tent Camping in a Model S

Do you know what stores might sell those? That looks like a perfect size, but I am not sure I'm not sure a soft cooler will work for us, especially once the ice starts melting and it is a cooler full of cold water.

In my fantasy world, I want to find a cooler that will take up most of the front part of the frunk, and the dry/boxed foods will be in the back cubby part of the frunk. Ideally the cooler will be able to keep ice frozen for several days, and it will be durable enough to drag in and out of the frunk several times a day (we were originally considering just a Styrofoam cooler...)
... am I asking for too much ?

Despite being softsided, the cooler is fairly rigid. I left the ice in it this weekend that I had placed inside on Saturday morning and there was still ice Monday morning, although it was mostly very cold water at that point. It is relatively easy to tip it over and pour the water out. I drag it in and out of the frunk fairly often, FWIW. The only retailer I know that carries it is Amazon, but perhaps you could check the company website and find other vendors from them.
 
Those Yeti coolers look really nice, but the price? wow! http://yeticoolers.com/hopper/. I think I would go with multiple smaller coolers, and sacrifice a little thermal efficiency if I needed to have the cooler(s) in the frunk. As always you get what you pay for, those are definitely the nicest soft sided coolers I've seen.
- That thought did cross our mind, but the sacrifice is a LARGE amount of thermal efficiency, as our mini trip taught us.

Heck you could probably build a really nice custom cooler that would fit the space perfectly for less than that. Something along the lines of this design, though I can think of a few things I would change http://www.westsystem.com/ss/building-an-efficient-icebox-2/
Now THIS is an awesome idea. To bad I lack that kind of skill set. If any of you decide to build one- I'd be the first in line to buy build #2 ;)

- - - Updated - - -

Despite being softsided, the cooler is fairly rigid. I left the ice in it this weekend that I had placed inside on Saturday morning and there was still ice Monday morning, although it was mostly very cold water at that point. It is relatively easy to tip it over and pour the water out. I drag it in and out of the frunk fairly often, FWIW. The only retailer I know that carries it is Amazon, but perhaps you could check the company website and find other vendors from them.

@LetsGoFast- Thanks for the review! That is what I've pretty much heard about most 'soft' coolers, which is why I was so hesitant to get one. I am testing the Yeti Hopper right now, and so far so good- I put three bags of ice in it last night, and left the car out in the hot Florida sun all day- and it is almost all ice still. The brochure assures me that I can even turn it completely upside down after the ice is all melted, and it won't leak. I will test that tomorrow (I need some of the ice to melt first).
 

abasile

TSLA shareholder
Supporting Member
If you are referring to a CPAP, then it can easily work all night and not be an issue as long as the humidifier (if so equipped) is turned off. Otherwise, camping with a small maritime/motorcycle battery to power the CPAP should allow for 3-4 nights use before a recharge.
I figured that might be the case. However, I'd still prefer a built-in 120V 15A outlet as a more user-friendly solution than carrying around an extra battery! :)
 

TaoJones

Beyond Driven
Nov 10, 2014
3,064
3,030
The Americas
I figured that might be the case. However, I'd still prefer a built-in 120V 15A outlet as a more user-friendly solution than carrying around an extra battery! :)

A friend travels with his VPAP frequently and uses a specifically-paired 12VDC adapter. Works flawlessly whether he naps in a front seat or sleeps in the rear. He leaves the 12VDC adapter in the car and has plans to acquire a 2nd VPAP solely for the car that will live in a go bag that fits in the microwave. Easy peasy.

My challenge is not so simple. I'd like to use a Nespresso for semi-proper espresso in the mornings; the surge amperage for the pump is significant to the point that a 4KW (pure sine) inverter appears to be a minimum solution. Check out the cabling requirements for one of those. While the inverter is not huge and would mount nicely dead amidships on the vertical surface in front of/under the rear seats, the cabling/connection to the onboard 12V is something I'd rather have blessed by Tesla engineering aforehand. Presuming that no such blessing will be forthcoming, my choices include waiting for a Model X (which presumably might lend itself to more adventurous adaptations), using a standalone marine deep-cycle 12V as a power source for the inverter (and solar to
charge the second battery), or to invest in a $3 cup heater and enjoy tea instead.
 

mspohr

Well-Known Member
Jul 27, 2014
12,091
16,172
California
My challenge is not so simple. I'd like to use a Nespresso for semi-proper espresso in the mornings; the surge amperage for the pump is significant to the point that a 4KW (pure sine) inverter appears to be a minimum solution. Check out the cabling requirements for one of those. While the inverter is not huge and would mount nicely dead amidships on the vertical surface in front of/under the rear seats, the cabling/connection to the onboard 12V is something I'd rather have blessed by Tesla engineering aforehand. Presuming that no such blessing will be forthcoming, my choices include waiting for a Model X (which presumably might lend itself to more adventurous adaptations), using a standalone marine deep-cycle 12V as a power source for the inverter (and solar to
charge the second battery), or to invest in a $3 cup heater and enjoy tea instead.
Nespresso isn't even close to espresso. For camping, drip coffee or an Aeropress is much better.
 

TaoJones

Beyond Driven
Nov 10, 2014
3,064
3,030
The Americas
Nespresso isn't even close to espresso. For camping, drip coffee or an Aeropress is much better.

That may be, but a Nespresso with reusable capsules and a tasty Alessi or similar grind and consistently good espresso can indeed be had. Not an aeropress fan and I don't do drip.

I should just switch to tea until the Model X becomes a bit... seasoned. Those cup heaters really are all of $3 and aside from their dubious source metal and slow operation, what's not to like?
 

mspohr

Well-Known Member
Jul 27, 2014
12,091
16,172
California
That may be, but a Nespresso with reusable capsules and a tasty Alessi or similar grind and consistently good espresso can indeed be had. Not an aeropress fan and I don't do drip.

I should just switch to tea until the Model X becomes a bit... seasoned. Those cup heaters really are all of $3 and aside from their dubious source metal and slow operation, what's not to like?
I really think switching to tea is extreme deprivation... I think you will regret it.
Sounds like it would be best to keep pursuing the Nespresso machine.
Or... Check this out: Lavazza Expressgo
Roadtesting the EspressGo portable car coffee machine
 

TaoJones

Beyond Driven
Nov 10, 2014
3,064
3,030
The Americas
I really think switching to tea is extreme deprivation... I think you will regret it.
Sounds like it would be best to keep pursuing the Nespresso machine.
Or... Check this out: Lavazza Expressgo
Roadtesting the EspressGo portable car coffee machine

SOLVED!

Thanks for the pointer in the right direction. As it turns out, neither the Lavazza version, or Philips/Saeco had a version that would facilitate using one's own coffee. All models were dependent upon pod use - and patented pod use at that, so there's no aftermarket except for foil covers for existing pods.

Enter Handpresso, which decided to offer a new version of the Espressgo called the "Espressgo Auto E.S.E (pods) AND Ground Coffee". Those last three words are the key. This version includes a single reusable "DomePod" and adapter for use with your own ground beans, and claims some other internal improvements.

The only tricky part is that Handpresso is based in France, and if there are North American retailers that carry the "and Ground Coffee", they're well-hidden. Fortunately the exchange rate against the euro is favorable. In fact, their price is at least $25 less (net of FTF) than the one Amazon seller, but Amazon returns are so simple that the extra $25-$40 may be worth it. I did order an extra 6 reusable DomePods directly from Handpresso since @ 2 shots per Americano, it's faster to make 2 drinks for you and a passenger if the pods are already prepacked.

Now I can move on to reconsidering a (hopefully frunk-sized) Engel (refrigerator/freezer), since the only thing better than an Americano is an iced Americano. Of course, then it becomes all about the quality of the water and ice, but that's another discussion.

The Espressgo Auto has a 16 bar pump - pretty close to the Nespresso's 19 bar IIRC - and takes about 3 minutes to heat the water and to produce 53ml of espresso with decent crema.

The kicker is that instead of spending $2/day for (4) E.S.E pods (or $5/day at a coffee shop) to make 2 Americanos, one expends about $0.30/day to make those 4 shots using an ounce of one's own (roasted and ground to personal taste) beans. I'm putting the $1.70/day saved toward tires for the Model S, which isn't too far off (when one figures a new set of 19" OEMs plus delivery, tax and certs will easily cost $1200 every 20 months (35K miles per set @ 21K miles/year south of the Mason-Dixon Line.)

Thanks again for pointing me in the right direction - the alternative was to install a 4KW inverter to drive the Nespresso pump, which by any measure could be described as overkill, not to mention the long, and inherently wrong way around the electric barn.
 
I'm putting the $1.70/day saved toward tires for the Model S, which isn't too far off (when one figures a new set of 19" OEMs plus delivery, tax and certs will easily cost $1200 every 20 months (35K miles per set @ 21K miles/year south of the Mason-Dixon Line.)
Not to take this thread off topic but, you should check these out when shopping for tires. https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Goodyear&tireModel=Eagle+RS-A2&partnum=445VR9RSA2 OEM Tires do not need to cost as much as what you stated above.
 
Darn it- just wrote a comment and lost it ? !?!

We bought this tent for our 20 day cross-country adventure. We loved it conceptually, and loved having the ability to sleep on our makeshift Tesla bed while camping. It was also nice to load/unload the car from inside the tent, but we split the seam in two different locations early in our journey. Got it replaced but we then broke the inside wire on two poles the very next day! We tried to get a different brand or model when we went back for the THIRD tent, but it was the only one Bass Pro carried in house. We didnt have any problems with that tent, but I have to question the durability. We never had problems with any of our other tents.
Just sharing our experience.

P.s. If any of u are considering a cross country camping adventure, it is a BLAST! What a great way to bond with the kid, check out this beautiful country, AND check out what a Tesla is capable of. Best family trip ever :)

Angel
 

TaoJones

Beyond Driven
Nov 10, 2014
3,064
3,030
The Americas
Not to take this thread off topic but, you should check these out when shopping for tires. https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Goodyear&tireModel=Eagle+RS-A2&partnum=445VR9RSA2 OEM Tires do not need to cost as much as what you stated above.
I'm aware of Tire Rack and have purchased more tires than I can count from Discount/America's Tire.Can anyone who has purchased the Goodyears linked above or similar tires comment with regard to longevity and noise? For half the money I'm not sure there's a benefit to these if they only last half as long, but more importantly given the car, quietness is at least as important. Tesla has said their testing shows the OEM 19" Michelins as best so far. I'd happily pay more or less if there's something better. While not thrilled about paying $300/tire, I'm not about to pay less for noisier :)
 
I'm aware of Tire Rack and have purchased more tires than I can count from Discount/America's Tire.Can anyone who has purchased the Goodyears linked above or similar tires comment with regard to longevity and noise? For half the money I'm not sure there's a benefit to these if they only last half as long, but more importantly given the car, quietness is at least as important. Tesla has said their testing shows the OEM 19" Michelins as best so far. I'd happily pay more or less if there's something better. While not thrilled about paying $300/tire, I'm not about to pay less for noisier :)
I would check out this thread: http://www.teslamotorsclub.com/showthread.php/40449-19-stock-tire-life and the other threads in that section of the forum that deal with the stock tires. I haven't had any issue with them.
 
Nespresso with power inverter FAIL

I learned the hard way it doesnt work although it can be done just not via the car 12vDC outlet. Would need to connect straight to ca battery. If anyone has instructions for this I'd be very interested i learning. Maybe an instructable? THanks in advance.



A friend travels with his VPAP frequently and uses a specifically-paired 12VDC adapter. Works flawlessly whether he naps in a front seat or sleeps in the rear. He leaves the 12VDC adapter in the car and has plans to acquire a 2nd VPAP solely for the car that will live in a go bag that fits in the microwave. Easy peasy.

My challenge is not so simple. I'd like to use a Nespresso for semi-proper espresso in the mornings; the surge amperage for the pump is significant to the point that a 4KW (pure sine) inverter appears to be a minimum solution. Check out the cabling requirements for one of those. While the inverter is not huge and would mount nicely dead amidships on the vertical surface in front of/under the rear seats, the cabling/connection to the onboard 12V is something I'd rather have blessed by Tesla engineering aforehand. Presuming that no such blessing will be forthcoming, my choices include waiting for a Model X (which presumably might lend itself to more adventurous adaptations), using a standalone marine deep-cycle 12V as a power source for the inverter (and solar to
charge the second battery), or to invest in a $3 cup heater and enjoy tea instead.
 

Cyclone

Cyclonic Member ((.oO))
Jan 12, 2015
5,115
1,207
Charlotte, NC
I learned the hard way it doesnt work although it can be done just not via the car 12vDC outlet. Would need to connect straight to ca battery. If anyone has instructions for this I'd be very interested i learning. Maybe an instructable? THanks in advance.

I would imagine that if you need to connect to the 12v battery, you'll be using the jump posts under the nosecone of the S.
 

TaoJones

Beyond Driven
Nov 10, 2014
3,064
3,030
The Americas
I still think that it's best to use something designed for 12v rather than house line current.
This Handpresso looks like it would work well.
Amazon.com: Handpresso Auto Espresso Maker: Kitchen Dining

And it does. Two things to note:

1) The Auto/Anywhere model enables use of one's own beans, as well as the pre-packaged pods. This is a key distinction as only this year's model offers that.

2) The Auto comes with only 1 domepod. Happily, the customer service from France is excellent - which is how to get extra pods. I got enough to have 7 so that refilling is done just weekly. While I did order the main unit via Amazon, I would not hesitate to order a second directly from France - the extra pods arrived in a week and the customer service was fast and thorough.

The Nespresso pump's surge amperage is just ridiculously high. As noted, it would require a 4kW pure sine wave inverter and while it is possible to install that with fused power from the 12V battery, it's beyond overkill. The Handpresso Auto heats the water, builds 16 bar of pressure (versus the Nespresso's 19 bar), and will produce the first shot in a minute and a half - and in less time for the second shot. Simple, and uses the existing 12V port - *and* fits in a cup holder.

Just completed the first 1,000-mile leg of the latest road trip. Starting the day with a double almond or vanilla espresso in the car just adds an extra touch of civility to the endeavor. Lattes are easy, cappuccinos are easy, and am still looking for the right dark chocolate for a stellar mocha. Plus I like my beans better than the standard Star*ucks fare.
 
I haven't tried this in "camper mode" yet, but did find a trick to turn the DRLs off (in Canada where we don't have the touchscreen option). In Park with the car on, if you select Parking Lights, then Off, the DRLs will shut completely down. As soon as you select Drive or Reverse, they'll come back on again.
I know this is a while ago, but I just played with this some. Unfortunately it doesn't work for this purpose.
While this works for the vehicle in park, you also can't keep the climate control going more than 30 minutes in that way. The trick to getting the climate control to stay on is to be in neutral, but with the parking brake engaged from the controls screen. Unfortunately in that mode, the DRLs won't turn off the way you suggested. I think I'm going to have to wire myself an override switch for those DRLs! (Of course this still doesn't solve the can't charge and sleep at the same time problem)
 
Here's something I've done recently with tent camping. I fashioned a contraption of Lexan and dryer hose to get the cold air from the rear seat vents to safely pass outside the car and into our tent. This was a recent visit to Galveston State Park in Galveston, TX. Getting the car to say on with the AC blowing AND charging is a bit of a trick:

1. Car is in Park
2. Plug the car in
3. Close all four front vents and open the rear two (for this experiment)
4. Make the car stay on overnight WHILE plugged in and charging:
a. The car will stay on if it detects something on the touchscreen (like a finger) so I hung a smooth piece of metal from a lanyard onto the touchscreen in an innocuous location on the screen.
b. To give it capacitance, I connected that piece of metal to the outer, ground part of a USB cable which was plugged into the center console.
c. Put a key in the center console, just under the cubby
d. Set your charge rate low enough to where the battery will be charging all night. Once the charging stops, the AC will turn off in 30 minutes.
e. Open the driver's side window all the way.
f. With the driver's side door closed partly but not shut, put the top half of your body into the car and press down firmly on the middle of the seat bottom so it detects you.
g. While pushing down, close the door all the way. If you're successful, the car will still be on and the doors are closed.
h. Reach into the open driver's side window with your right hand and click all the way up on the driver's door window switch where it does auto up. Remember to remove your hand and arm right away, but the window will gently reverse direction if your arm or hand gets in the way of it closing.
i. After that, open the Tesla app on your smartphone (which hopefully isn't inside the now closed car) and lock the car.


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