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Tesla 3 charging

CT&KT

New Member
Mar 12, 2021
2
0
San Diego
I have a 220V outlet for my dryer that I am not using. The outlet is connected to four wires (black, red, white, and bare). It is powered by two 30 AMP breakers that are connected together. Can I rewire this to a NEMA 14-50 receptacle for charging my Tesla 3 long range car?
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,093
7,054
Boise, ID
I have a 220V outlet for my dryer that I am not using. The outlet is connected to four wires (black, red, white, and bare). It is powered by two 30 AMP breakers that are connected together. Can I rewire this to a NEMA 14-50 receptacle for charging my Tesla 3 long range car?
No. You don't need to rewire that. You don't need to use a 14-50 outlet. What you have is a perfectly installed 14-30 outlet. Just buy the 14-30 adapter plug from the Tesla store and plug into it. There's nothing special you need to do.


Just select the 14-30 adapter plug and order it. It's $35.
 
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CT&KT

New Member
Mar 12, 2021
2
0
San Diego
I have a 220V outlet for my dryer that I am not using. The outlet is connected to four wires (black, red, white, and bare). It is powered by two 30 AMP breakers that are connected together. Can I rewire this to a NEMA 14-50 receptacle for charging my Tesla 3 long range car?

No. You don't need to rewire that. You don't need to use a 14-50 outlet. What you have is a perfectly installed 14-30 outlet. Just buy the 14-30 adapter plug from the Tesla store and plug into it. There's nothing special you need to do.


Just select the 14-30 adapter plug and order it. It's $35.
Thank you Rocky, the existing outlet unfortunately is too far for the charging cable to reach the car. So, I will have to disconnect it from the panel and rewire a new outlet that would be installed close to where the car is parked. So, my question refers to the new outlet. Could it be a 14-50 (a friend already has given me one at no cost) or do I have to have a 30 amp receptacle like a 10-30 or 14-30? I am not very familiar to what the two connected 30 A breakers mean. Are they still 30 A or are they additive, 60 A?
 
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jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Nov 28, 2018
8,088
8,959
Riverside Co. CA
If you dont know what the two connected 30 amp breakers mean, that also means that you should likely be hiring someone to move that outlet for you. To answer your question, no, you can not simply connect the wires that currently connect to your 14-30 to a 14-50 outlet, that is still connected to your 240v 30 amp circuit.
 
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M3BlueGeorgia

Active Member
Dec 10, 2018
1,345
1,075
Atlanta, GA
I have a 220V outlet for my dryer that I am not using. The outlet is connected to four wires (black, red, white, and bare). It is powered by two 30 AMP breakers that are connected together. Can I rewire this to a NEMA 14-50 receptacle for charging my Tesla 3 long range car?
14-30 is probably ideal.

BTW: That's what we use.
 
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Petermcg

Member
Sep 26, 2018
147
236
Apex, NC
Two 30-amp connected breakers means that is a 60 amp line. I have exactly your setup and had an electricIan disconnect the drier outlet (which is upstairs) and wire my wall charger to the 60 amp line. It’s code in my state that an electric drier line is available, so I’ll have to reconnect the drier outlet when I sell the house.
 
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UncleCreepy

Member
Mar 29, 2020
191
301
Lunenburg, ON
Two 30-amp connected breakers means that is a 60 amp line.
No, it does not. Both hot wires are on their respective 30 Amp breaker and since neutral is not used when charging the car, they will both carry up to 24 Amps (80% of 30 Amps) continuous load. That doesn't make it 60 Amps. No wire in the whole installation ever carries 60 Amps.
Please follow @jjrandorin s advice and hire someone who is qualified to do this kind of work.
 
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Mrbrock

Member
Mar 26, 2020
679
367
Napa, CA
It is a dual pole 30A breaker which makes it 220/240V vs a single pole which is 110/120.

Code will not allow you to install a 14-50 outlet on a 30A breaker. The 14-30 outlet cost is $10.

Are you planning to do this yourself or have a qualified licensed electrician do it? It sounds like you need to have a new circuit run from your panel to where you want the new plug. If so, you should bring someone in who may be able to present you with other options like adding a new 40A circuit to take full advantage of the mobile connector. Then you could use your 14-50 outlet. At the very least, they’d just relocate your current 30A circuit/receptacle to where you want it.

How far away from your ideal location is the dryer outlet?
 
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Petermcg

Member
Sep 26, 2018
147
236
Apex, NC
No, it does not. Both hot wires are on their respective 30 Amp breaker and since neutral is not used when charging the car, they will both carry up to 24 Amps (80% of 30 Amps) continuous load. That doesn't make it 60 Amps. No wire in the whole installation ever carries 60 Amps.
Please follow @jjrandorin s advice and hire someone who is qualified to do this kind of work.
You are absolutely correct. What I should have said is that the two 30 amp breakers can be switched out to a 60 amp (double pole) breaker, which is what I did (well, my electrician did).
 
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Mrbrock

Member
Mar 26, 2020
679
367
Napa, CA
You are absolutely correct. What I should have said is that the two 30 amp breakers can be switched out to a 60 amp (double pole) breaker, which is what I did (well, my electrician did).
No! If the ”two” breakers are tied together they are a single 30A 2 pole breaker. This cannot be swapped out for a 60A 2 pole breaker unless the panel has the overhead to support 30 more amps. You can swap out a 30A 2 pole breaker for a 60A single pole and have an empty space and not increase the load on your system but you cannot swap out as you suggest without doing proper load calculations (which is a calculation your electrician did while taking in to account your whole system).

Common residential service is 2 separate 110/120V wires and 1 neutral wire along with a ground wire. A single pole breaker has one of these 110 and a neutral wire which gives you 110V circuit. A 2 pole breaker has two 110V and a neutral so you get 220V. If you don’t understand this, please don’t give recommendations to people and leave it to licensed electricians to make recommendations.
 
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Petermcg

Member
Sep 26, 2018
147
236
Apex, NC
No! If the ”two” breakers are tied together they are a single 30A 2 pole breaker. This cannot be swapped out for a 60A 2 pole breaker unless the panel has the overhead to support 30 more amps. You can swap out a 30A 2 pole breaker for a 60A single pole and have an empty space and not increase the load on your system but you cannot swap out as you suggest without doing proper load calculations (which is a calculation your electrician did while taking in to account your whole system).

Common residential service is 2 separate 110/120V wires and 1 neutral wire along with a ground wire. A single pole breaker has one of these 110 and a neutral wire which gives you 110V circuit. A 2 pole breaker has two 110V and a neutral so you get 220V. If you don’t understand this, please don’t give recommendations to people and leave it to licensed electricians to make recommendations.
Yes, that is what my electrician did. I had a single open space in my panel, which is now a double-pole 60 amp (after sacrificing my 30 amp drier breaker). Load calculations should always be done if you’re increasing the panel amperage, as you indicated.
 
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Mrbrock

Member
Mar 26, 2020
679
367
Napa, CA
Load calculations are one thing. Most importantly, the wires between the breaker box and the outlet also have to be rated for 60 Amps. Chances are they are not.
And while we're at it: the nominal voltage is 120/240 V, not 110/220 V.

Yes, supply from lines is 120 bit typically between 110-115 at the outlet. I apologize, I simplified in my head and didn’t explain.

Peter, I think you are still missing the boat on this. You told him to replace his two 30amp breakers with 1 60 amp breaker. He doesn’t have two breakers. He has 1 30amp 2 pole breaker (2 30amp breakers tied together per the OP). if he had 2 30A 2 pole breakers he could replace with 1 60A 2 pole breaker but in his terms that would be 4 30A breakers tied together.

As UC mentioned, the wires for a 30A circuit are likely 10ga NM-B (romex). You need 4ga for 60A.

At the end of the day, he is running a new circuit to a new location for an outlet. Unless he has the skills and knowledge to turn off power, remove the existing wiring for dryer circuit, size new circuit and wiring within max capacity, run new wire from panel to new location, and install an outlet then he should be contacting an electrician, telling the what he would ideally have and then let the electrician decide what works with his electrical system and install that. Asking questions on this forum about who to seek guidance from is great, taking advice and doing work yourself is a great way to burn your house down if you don’t understand what you are doing.
 
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Petermcg

Member
Sep 26, 2018
147
236
Apex, NC
Yes, supply from lines is 120 bit typically between 110-115 at the outlet. I apologize, I simplified in my head and didn’t explain.

Peter, I think you are still missing the boat on this. You told him to replace his two 30amp breakers with 1 60 amp breaker. He doesn’t have two breakers. He has 1 30amp 2 pole breaker (2 30amp breakers tied together per the OP). if he had 2 30A 2 pole breakers he could replace with 1 60A 2 pole breaker but in his terms that would be 4 30A breakers tied together.

As UC mentioned, the wires for a 30A circuit are likely 10ga NM-B (romex). You need 4ga for 60A.

At the end of the day, he is running a new circuit to a new location for an outlet. Unless he has the skills and knowledge to turn off power, remove the existing wiring for dryer circuit, size new circuit and wiring within max capacity, run new wire from panel to new location, and install an outlet then he should be contacting an electrician, telling the what he would ideally have and then let the electrician decide what works with his electrical system and install that. Asking questions on this forum about who to seek guidance from is great, taking advice and doing work yourself is a great way to burn your house down if you don’t understand what you are doing.
i apologize, I read it as two 30 amp single throws instead of one 30 amp double. Of course the existing wall wiring isn’t going to be adequate. You can’t just slap in a higher-amp breaker and call it a day. I assumed he was wiring in a new outlet with the required heavier gauge wire into his new breaker, not just reusing the original outlet. I meant only to say that he has space and likely the capacity in his panel to wire in a new double pole 60 breaker if he if he takes out two 30 amp circuits. But pulling out one double throw 30 doesn’t give us enough information about the panel’s capacity to say at this point whether it will permit a new 60 amp line.

As several have said (and I totally agree with), let an experienced electrician do the actual work.
 
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Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,093
7,054
Boise, ID
Thank you Rocky, the existing outlet unfortunately is too far for the charging cable to reach the car. So, I will have to disconnect it from the panel and rewire a new outlet that would be installed close to where the car is parked. So, my question refers to the new outlet. Could it be a 14-50 (a friend already has given me one at no cost) or do I have to have a 30 amp receptacle like a 10-30 or 14-30?
Well...then you're just putting in an entirely new circuit in a different location, and it doesn't really have anything to do with the old outlet or circuit and doesn't have to match or be like the old one that goes to a different place.
I am not very familiar to what the two connected 30 A breakers mean. Are they still 30 A or are they additive, 60 A?
No. And this is why it's better to use more accurate terminology for this. When they have the handles tied together like that it is one "double pole 30A breaker". Don't call it two breakers, because that does lead people to doing things like thinking they can add the number of amps together. If it is a smaller one that just has the single independent switch, that means it is just connected to 120V. If it is bigger, with the double handle connected together, it is connected to 240V. But the number of amps printed on it is still just the number of amps--no adding.
 
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