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Tesla Autosteering Compared to Competitors. Is it Better?

I've seen plenty of concepts, and "soon to be released" demos of autosteering, but I've never seen this function available on a regular consumer car available for purchase. But I've been told it exists.


How does Tesla's autosteering stack up against the competition? Is it just "old news", or is there anything better/unique about it?
 
I've seen plenty of concepts, and "soon to be released" demos of autosteering, but I've never seen this function available on a regular consumer car available for purchase. But I've been told it exists.


How does Tesla's autosteering stack up against the competition? Is it just "old news", or is there anything better/unique about it?

Early reports suggest it's better. The fact that it will be continuously improved via crowd-sourced data is unmatched.
 

techmaven

Active Member
Feb 27, 2013
3,618
9,768
Based even on Hyundai's idealized setup, the Tesla does a better job of staying centered. Not to mention Tesla's UI is way ahead. I hope to never try out the emergency braking, but would be surprised if it didn't work at least as well. It seems as if almost every other vehicle requires you to either keep your hands on the wheel or have them there more often than not, which is not the case with Tesla. So, probably both the most accurate auto steering available and the one which allows the most freedom.
 
Cool, but be careful!

My Ford Fusion Energi had "Lane Keep Assist" and it would ping-pong between lane markings -- when it could find them. I just tested the auto-steer of the Tesla this morning and it steered about the same, or maybe better, than I would on a good country highway. As it is very new, I don't trust it completely and am doing as they suggest -- keeping my hands on, or at least very near, the wheel. I've had more than one instance, in 20 minutes of driving, that were scary enough for me to learn to keep my hands and feet ready to go. I'm talking about swerving into oncoming traffic, or driving off the road.
 
The only other system I've driven is the Mercedes one and I'm tenatively saying that Tesla is very close, if not better already. Most reports I've read or videos I've watched suggest that the Mercedes system was the best in class (of current production systems, not including things demonstrated by Audi or Volvo). If Tesla does in fact use aggregate data to develop detailed mapping of roads and improve the performance of autosteer, it has the potential to be far, far better.

The Tesla system seems to be more ambitious in terms of trying to work in marginal conditions where the Mercedes would simply refuse to activate.
 

S4WRXTTCS

Well-Known Member
May 3, 2015
6,522
7,927
Snohomish, WA
I would rule out any system that ping-ponged between the lanes
I would rule out any system that required hands to be on the wheel for it to function (no coke can tricks)
I would rule out any system that had timed nags.
I would rule out any system that couldn't handle slight/moderate corners on the freeway.

So who's left?
 
I would rule out any system that ping-ponged between the lanes
I would rule out any system that required hands to be on the wheel for it to function (no coke can tricks)
I would rule out any system that had timed nags.
I would rule out any system that couldn't handle slight/moderate corners on the freeway.

So who's left?

Infiniti Q50 (since 2013).

Not sure about others - maybe Lexus?
 
For the q50

Infiniti Driving Straight Into the Future - Corporate Intelligence - WSJ

The system requires fairly straight roads and works best with limited traffic. With adaptive cruise control turned on, combined with the car’s “lane-keeping” system, the car will keep itself in the middle of the lane and brake when needed. In testing over hundreds of miles, I was able to take my hands off the wheel for up to 5 minutes.

If the lane curves more than a gentle turn, the system doesn’t work as well. The car will jerk back into the lane, then hit the other lane and jerk back the other direction, ping-ponging between the lanes. It’s clearly not designed to steer through the curve.
 

stopcrazypp

Well-Known Member
Dec 8, 2007
12,006
7,788
From what I have read on various systems, there is no system that combines all of the advantages of the Tesla system.

In terms of staying in the middle of the lane smoothly, I think the Mercedes S-Class one is the benchmark. However, that system has a timed nag to keep your hands on the steering wheel.

The rest seem to ping pong under certain circumstances (even the Q50). I think the main reason is because most lane keeping systems are designed as an "assist" feature. Meaning they are not designed to "drive" for you, but rather "correct" when you are in danger of straying from your lane.
 
My first car with TACC was a 2002 Infiniti QX4. Yes, 13 years ago. Since then, I've been very interested in the technology (and relatively slow improvements in over ten years). I've had other Infinitis and the more recent Ford Fusion (with automatic parking and lane assist). I'm also familiar with the Mercedes technology.

After using 7.0 today, I believe it's as good or better than anything else out there. I was able to drive 8 miles on a two lane highway with light and moderate traffic without intervention. This included stopping behind red lights (with a car in front of me), curves and hills, and flawless automatic lane changing. There is no unnecessary nagging.

My biggest gripe: When a car in front of you slows and turns into a shopping plaza (for example), the car doesn't get back up to speed fast enough. In other words, you're going 50mph, the car in front slows to 20mph to turn. When it clears, the acceleration should be more aggressive to get you back to the original speed.

But overall, it's fantastic and really a glimpse at an autonomous future. This is the first time I genuinely feel we're only a few years from viable autonomous driving. This is the real deal.
 

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