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Tesla belatedly tries to make their connector a North American standard

Per Electrek:

What’s important to keep in mind here is that the US government recently unlocked billions of dollars in funding for EV charging stations and while the government didn’t require those stations to work with the CCS connector, it did require that the charging stations receiving funding work with EVs “from more than one automaker.”

For now, this requirement disqualifies Tesla’s Supercharger station, but if only one automaker decides to adopt Tesla’s connector, or now the North American Charging Standard (NACS), it would qualify Tesla’s Supercharger network for incentives.

While some might see this as a loophole, it’s one for a good cause because Tesla’s connector is undoubtedly a better design than CCS.


 

MP3Mike

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2016
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Oregon
If this were to become a thing with the Tesla to CCS adapter, could salvage Tesla supercharge by adding a CCS to Tesla adapter?

Tesla->CCS->CCS adapter->Salvage Tesla car
No. The NACS standard is just the connector, not the protocol. (All of those adapters would be passthrough, with the car/Supercharger having no way to know any adapters were in use.) So you can charge using the Tesla or CCS protocol over the NACS connector.

For example EA could add the NACS connector to their stalls and not have to change any software, at which point any CCS compatible Tesla could use the stall without the adapter. And assuming Tesla adds the CCS protocol to Superchargers, like they have done in Europe, other OEMs could add a NACS port to their vehicles with CCS capabilities and they could start using the Supercharger network without any adapter or software changes.
 
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MP3Mike

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2016
20,433
51,901
Oregon
For now, this requirement disqualifies Tesla’s Supercharger station, but if only one automaker decides to adopt Tesla’s connector, or now the North American Charging Standard (NACS), it would qualify Tesla’s Supercharger network for incentives.
Aptera has been pushing for the NACS to be the standard, and have shown it in use on their prototype vehicles. So there is your one automaker, once they actually start producing them.
 

Cosmacelf

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Supporting Member
Mar 6, 2013
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Aptera has been pushing for the NACS to be the standard, and have shown it in use on their prototype vehicles. So there is your one automaker, once they actually start producing them.
Tesla should just “invest” in them to make sure they can produce a vehicle!
 

strider

Active Member
Oct 20, 2010
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NE Oklahoma
It's definitely an attempt to grab govt subsidies. A skill Tesla is quite adept at. Agree with the others that they should have done this years ago. They said they were going to but the licensing agreements said otherwise. Unfortunately the horse has already left the barn. I don't see large manufacturers moving to TPS.
 

RTPEV

Active Member
Mar 21, 2016
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Durham, NC
Belatedly is the perfect word. And I would not say 5 years, but rather 8 years too late. To actually have this have any chance of this being accepted as a standard, they would have had to put it forward at the time the CCS standard itself was being promoted. Not that anyone would have taken them seriously, and not that Tesla would have had any interest in promoting it then as they truly did view the connector and the nascent Supercharger network as a competitive advantage at the time.

I think the chances of it being adopted at this point are zero to nil, especially now that the floodgates of CCS vehicles have actually now started to open.
 
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It's definitely an attempt to grab govt subsidies. A skill Tesla is quite adept at. Agree with the others that they should have done this years ago. They said they were going to but the licensing agreements said otherwise. Unfortunately the horse has already left the barn. I don't see large manufacturers moving to TPS.
I've been saying for years they should have done this in, like 2014 or 2015. Now is too late, and designed to be a dog in the manger about open charging funding, not actually enable open charging networks.
 

ItsNotAboutTheMoney

Well-Known Member
Jul 12, 2012
12,690
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Maine
I wonder, why now? If there were going to do this, why not five years ago?


Lower cost of coverage?

Maybe they think that by opening it up, they can get networks to include their plug on chargers deployed in low-density areas and concentrate on higher-density areas.

For example, there are RFPs out to install chargers in Northern Maine.
 

RTPEV

Active Member
Mar 21, 2016
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Durham, NC
If anything, I am certainly THRILLED to hear Tesla has zero plans to switch their NA vehicles to CCS.
Maybe in 2022.

I'm wondering how you will feel in 5 years. By then (unless this actually does unexpectedly become accepted), the number of CCS vehicles & CCS/J1772 stations will start to dwarf the number of Teslas. Tesla owners will then continue to have to use an adapter to charge at non-Tesla sites, and no doubt this will be seen as a barrier to some.
 

MP3Mike

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2016
20,433
51,901
Oregon
I'm wondering how you will feel in 5 years. By then (unless this actually does unexpectedly become accepted), the number of CCS vehicles & CCS/J1772 stations will start to dwarf the number of Teslas. Tesla owners will then continue to have to use an adapter to charge at non-Tesla sites, and no doubt this will be seen as a barrier to some.
Did you see that network operators already have plans in motion to add NACS connectors to their sites? (So it is likely that NACS compatible plugs will continue to dwarf CCS Type 1 plugs going forward.) They need people to use their chargers to stay a-float, so they will want to attract all of the Teslas that they can, and by not requiring an adapter will make that easier.

I wonder if this is part of why EA moved to a single CCS cable on their next-gen stall design. (i.e. to make it easy to add a NACS cable to them.)
 
Maybe in 2022.

I'm wondering how you will feel in 5 years. By then (unless this actually does unexpectedly become accepted), the number of CCS vehicles & CCS/J1772 stations will start to dwarf the number of Teslas. Tesla owners will then continue to have to use an adapter to charge at non-Tesla sites, and no doubt this will be seen as a barrier to some.
Tesla's supercharger network shows no signs of slowing down and always will be the best network, so I'm not sure I follow your train of thought. Can't see myself feeling any other way and wanting to use an inferior, oversized CCS connector at an inferior charging station with thick cables. My adapter will always be in the trunk for emergencies but 5 years from now the charging network will be so dense I can't foresee many emergencies anyways.
 

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