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Tesla Bros Skid Plates - Got Em

Did anyone try the Evanexx skid plate?

 
  • Informative
Reactions: JHCCAZ
Did anyone try the Evanexx skid plate?

never heard of it but looks legit!
 

JHCCAZ

Electrified Engineer
Supporting Member
Feb 2, 2021
712
1,373
Tucson
For people thinking about swapping to metal skid plates, I think it's important to clarify that Tesla switched the factory covers from a fairly inadequate fiber-type material to a much better molded plastic design. I don't know exactly when in this change-over occurred, but it seems it was sometime between mid-2020 and mid-2021.

I didn't realize this until after I received my aluminum plates from RPM and set up to do the installation. The advertising copy and videos, from several sites, talked about the old fiber type covers and didn't explain that the customer's car could already have something better. I'm not sorry I bought the aluminum ones, but it's always better to understand your situation.
( I still endorse RPM and other stateside suppliers, even though some people try to get the products cheaper from AliExpress or whatever. RPM isn't the cheapest, and their videos sometimes gloss over certain installation issues, but they've gladly helped me out twice with specific unusual hardware support issues; that would have been nearly impossible otherwise.)​

If you have the older fiber covers, I think the aftermarket replacements are a huge step up in protection. If you have the newer plastic ones, it's your call. The aluminum ones are more protective, but the plastic ones are not bad now.

I bought the front and rear RPM plates for my new MY during their last Christmas sale. And a friend ordered for his new M3P at the same time, then donated his M3 factory plastic plates to me; I shipped them up to my son who has a 2020 M3. Then we installed them together on my last visit, and there's no doubt the plastic or the metal ones are both way better than the original rippable fiber.

I did find that I had to slightly elongate the two holes where the male bolts come through, ie the only two that are secured with flange nuts instead of the captured-washer small black bolts. The plates are aluminum so this took only about 3 minutes each with a normal-sized round file. I also agree with @gr8tdane24 that the rear aluminum plate doesn't come with any means to attach it back to the fender skirt near the rear wheel. They could come up with a 90° bent J-bolt kind of hardware for this, but they didn't bother. So you can do what he did and fashion a bracket, or you can let it go without the attachment, which is what I did so far.

For reattaching the bolts, I used lower strength threadlocker. The head of one of the original bolts twisted off even though I removed everything with a hand ratchet instead of a power tool. These body bolts with captured washer are fairly easy to find on Amazon, in case you want to be prepared for breaking or losing any of the originals.
 
For people thinking about swapping to metal skid plates, I think it's important to clarify that Tesla switched the factory covers from a fairly inadequate fiber-type material to a much better molded plastic design. I don't know exactly when in this change-over occurred, but it seems it was sometime between mid-2020 and mid-2021.

I didn't realize this until after I received my aluminum plates from RPM and set up to do the installation. The advertising copy and videos, from several sites, talked about the old fiber type covers and didn't explain that the customer's car could already have something better. I'm not sorry I bought the aluminum ones, but it's always better to understand your situation.
( I still endorse RPM and other stateside suppliers, even though some people try to get the products cheaper from AliExpress or whatever. RPM isn't the cheapest, and their videos sometimes gloss over certain installation issues, but they've gladly helped me out twice with specific unusual hardware support issues; that would have been nearly impossible otherwise.)​

If you have the older fiber covers, I think the aftermarket replacements are a huge step up in protection. If you have the newer plastic ones, it's your call. The aluminum ones are more protective, but the plastic ones are not bad now.

I bought the front and rear RPM plates for my new MY during their last Christmas sale. And a friend ordered for his new M3P at the same time, then donated his M3 factory plastic plates to me; I shipped them up to my son who has a 2020 M3. Then we installed them together on my last visit, and there's no doubt the plastic or the metal ones are both way better than the original rippable fiber.

I did find that I had to slightly elongate the two holes where the male bolts come through, ie the only two that are secured with flange nuts instead of the captured-washer small black bolts. The plates are aluminum so this took only about 3 minutes each with a normal-sized round file. I also agree with @gr8tdane24 that the rear aluminum plate doesn't come with any means to attach it back to the fender skirt near the rear wheel. They could come up with a 90° bent J-bolt kind of hardware for this, but they didn't bother. So you can do what he did and fashion a bracket, or you can let it go without the attachment, which is what I did so far.

For reattaching the bolts, I used lower strength threadlocker. The head of one of the original bolts twisted off even though I removed everything with a hand ratchet instead of a power tool. These body bolts with captured washer are fairly easy to find on Amazon, in case you want to be prepared for breaking or losing any of the originals.
I think the plastic ones that Tesla now uses are still inadequate. They are just plain ABS “sewer pipe” plastic and are pretty prone to cracking. Tesla would have been wise to use a glass fiber reinforced plastic like PA6 nylon.
 
  • Like
Reactions: chump408 and JHCCAZ

JHCCAZ

Electrified Engineer
Supporting Member
Feb 2, 2021
712
1,373
Tucson
I think the plastic ones that Tesla now uses are still inadequate. They are just plain ABS “sewer pipe” plastic and are pretty prone to cracking. Tesla would have been wise to use a glass fiber reinforced plastic like PA6 nylon.
Yes, like I said I'm still glad I got mine, I recommend them and I'd do it again. But I just think people should know the score.
 

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