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Tesla called me to ask if I wanted to order new key fobs

SSedan

Active Member
Jul 24, 2017
2,948
2,591
Greenville Wisconsin
Hopefully the cost is very modest since this is arguably an avoidable flaw.
There is history of manufacturers making parts cheap if they can avoid an outright recall.

I suspect reprogramming will be required and if they can subsidize the labor with a modest cost it is cheaper than a recall.

I will inquire next time my car is in for service.
 

BigD0g

Active Member
Jan 12, 2017
2,019
4,429
Somewhere
I'd pay $150/key, that's reasonable.

So, if Apple / Microsoft came out and said you need to pay $300 to patch a 0 day exploit because they comissioned poor software from a vendor that you should know at the time is very poor for your computer, you'd give them your check book?

40 bit DES was destroyed before Tesla even became a thing, so to use it as the "key" to the car is quite sad, maybe CA worthy, but I'm no lawyer

I'l just buy a blocking sleeve.
 

aikisteve

Member
Feb 8, 2017
238
286
Belgium
So, if Apple / Microsoft came out and said you need to pay $300 to patch a 0 day exploit because they comissioned poor software from a vendor that you should know at the time is very poor for your computer, you'd give them your check book?

40 bit DES was destroyed before Tesla even became a thing, so to use it as the "key" to the car is quite sad, maybe CA worthy, but I'm no lawyer

I'l just buy a blocking sleeve.

Any metallic box basically does the trick. But I also had the discussion whether you'd want Mickeysoft to charge for every security patch they release. I feel Tesla should have know and they commissioned an order for those specific keys. Somebody did not check the specifics, it seems. Could have been avoided, but at least Tesla offers a solution.
 

markb1

Active Member
Feb 17, 2012
3,085
702
San Diego, CA
$150 is not reasonable. Pretty sure a replacement fob a year ago was $120.

Higher price to fix a security flaw known at production is too steep.

Whether or not they knew about it at production, the flaw was certainly present at production, and therefore should be covered by the warranty.
 
So, if Apple / Microsoft came out and said you need to pay $300 to patch a 0 day exploit because they comissioned poor software from a vendor that you should know at the time is very poor for your computer, you'd give them your check book?

40 bit DES was destroyed before Tesla even became a thing, so to use it as the "key" to the car is quite sad, maybe CA worthy, but I'm no lawyer

I'l just buy a blocking sleeve.

Or use PIN to Drive.
 

thegruf

Active Member
Mar 24, 2015
2,291
2,073
indeterminate
i didn't think the relays decoded the signal, just relayed it, I dont believe anyone is hacking 40 bit DES at this level.
If this is the case it doesnt matter the security protocol because it is just an rf capture.

The new keys might have better randomization though which is more likely to make the difference.
I dont think Tesla are offering the new key as a definitive cure all for relay type hacks.

Personally I loathe the PIN entry method, but understand why it has been implemented.
I'm still hoping for a more advanced solution to emerge from Tesla in due course.
Until then no PE or metal holders for the keys for me.
 

MP3Mike

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2016
16,858
40,470
Oregon
i didn't think the relays decoded the signal, just relayed it, I dont believe anyone is hacking 40 bit DES at this level.
If this is the case it doesnt matter the security protocol because it is just an rf capture.

The new keys might have better randomization though which is more likely to make the difference.
I dont think Tesla are offering the new key as a definitive cure all for relay type hacks.

I don't think the new fobs have anything to do with the relay attacks. The new fobs prevent the hacks on the 40-bit encryption that allows your fob to be cloned in seconds. (So somebody would just need to be near your car when you get in and drive one time and then they could steal your car anytime even if you had your fobs in a faraday cage or another country.)
 

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