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Tesla Model 3 in Australia

Brissienew

Member
Dec 9, 2014
382
149
Brisbane, Queensland
Does chill mode save energy on cruising and relaxed driving? The difference I noticed with the chill mode is a much more latent throttle response, more like an ICE car than an EV. So I wonder if I drive gently in normal mode whether it would still use much more energy than if driving In chill mode.
 

Priit

Member
Mar 25, 2019
528
508
Carrara, QLD, Australia
Oddly I noticed the first 10% from 100% down to 90% charge got swallowed at ~ 220Wh/km then consumption reduced markedly towards 190Wh/Km, without me changing anything.
That difference in the very high battery charge comes from regenerative breaking being disabled. Even when driving on the motorway with the road sometimes going down a bit or slowing for the cars in front of you, the car uses regenerative breaking and puts some power back to battery thus getting better average on the Wh/km display. It makes a massive difference. At about 90% the car will allow full advantage of regen to be put back in the battery.
When battery is full or near full, it will not accept extra charge at the rate regen would push it and so the extra power is lost.
 

kieranu

Member
Jul 22, 2014
268
177
Australia
The difference I noticed with the chill mode is a much more latent throttle response, more like an ICE car than an EV.
Acceleration is slower, 6.8s 0-100 and no downshifting so still leave most cars for dust.
Main impact on energy in urban driving is if you are accelerating hard a lot, yes. If you are cruising and accelerating slowly and smoothly, you'll use about same amount of energy covering the same distance in 15 minutes or 30 minutes in stop/start traffic.
 

Flatbat

Member
Nov 12, 2019
434
399
Melbourne
That difference in the very high battery charge comes from regenerative breaking being disabled. Even when driving on the motorway with the road sometimes going down a bit or slowing for the cars in front of you, the car uses regenerative breaking and puts some power back to battery thus getting better average on the Wh/km display. It makes a massive difference. At about 90% the car will allow full advantage of regen to be put back in the battery.
When battery is full or near full, it will not accept extra charge at the rate regen would push it and so the extra power is lost.
Thanks for the explanation. I do indeed recall a message saying something to the effect "Regen Braking unavailable" when I set off. So one cannot really extrapolate < 90% Wh/km across the full battery capacity. The first 10% wlll in theory always be markedly less which is exactly what I was seeing.
 
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Flatbat

Member
Nov 12, 2019
434
399
Melbourne
No, set off at 80% which showed 400 km range on the GOM. I have left my Aeros on, I don’t like the look of the wheels without them. My lifetime efficiency is 166 Wh/km ....
Be interesting to see how your Wh/km goes for the first 10% of a full charge.

Your comment about driving with the heater on is a key bit of info. The heater in Model 3 is resistive, not reverse-cycle AC, so uses a LOT more power which would have a noticeable effect on range and reported efficiency.
I am still a little sceptical about heating being a significant cause of high consumption on yesterdays drive. Sit any car with glass sunroof outside, windows closed during the day in 15C and I would have thought radiation alone would heat the cabin to the mid 20s. Sure I understand if it really is cold out, but raising it from 15 to 22 with the assistance of the sun does not seem like a big ask. Perhaps I should do the return trip in bare bones mode with everything off to see how it compares.
 

Priit

Member
Mar 25, 2019
528
508
Carrara, QLD, Australia
I am still a little sceptical about heating being a significant cause of high consumption on yesterdays drive. Sit any car with glass sunroof outside, windows closed during the day in 15C and I would have thought radiation alone would heat the cabin to the mid 20s. Sure I understand if it really is cold out, but raising it from 15 to 22 with the assistance of the sun does not seem like a big ask. Perhaps I should do the return trip in bare bones mode with everything off to see how it compares.
From all the reports I have read, the heating does take considerable amount of energy, so you could test if the temperature is not too bad in the car and use seat heating instead of heating the air in the car, apparently seat heating takes only a fraction of energy that the heating in the car takes. I personally have not used heating yet as I got the car in September and so far there has not been a temperature in my area that would have warranted any heating in the car.
 

jyavenard

Member
Aug 23, 2019
171
209
Melbourne
Does chill mode save energy on cruising and relaxed driving? The difference I noticed with the chill mode is a much more latent throttle response, more like an ICE car than an EV. So I wonder if I drive gently in normal mode whether it would still use much more energy than if driving In chill mode.

It prevents you driving like a lunatic just for the sake of it.

Like overtaking cars by instantly getting to 140+km/h
Or joining a freeway and flooring it because you can.

That's how I drive.

If I could control myself I'm sure there would be no difference between chill mode and standard.

But this car is too much fun, and I abuse it.

I've never managed to exceed 400km from a full charge with this car.
 

Kiwiadventure

Member
Jan 9, 2018
497
233
Auckland New Zealand
It prevents you driving like a lunatic just for the sake of it.

Like overtaking cars by instantly getting to 140+km/h
Or joining a freeway and flooring it because you can.

That's how I drive.

If I could control myself I'm sure there would be no difference between chill mode and standard.

But this car is too much fun, and I abuse it.

I've never managed to exceed 400km from a full charge with this car.

Agree as I can drive my Tesla 3 like a BMW M3 but costs me hardly nothing to charge as well no noise so the cops cannot hear me coming. :cool:
 
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Flatbat

Member
Nov 12, 2019
434
399
Melbourne
From all the reports I have read, the heating does take considerable amount of energy, so you could test if the temperature is not too bad in the car and use seat heating instead of heating the air in the car, apparently seat heating takes only a fraction of energy that the heating in the car takes. I personally have not used heating yet as I got the car in September and so far there has not been a temperature in my area that would have warranted any heating in the car.
Yeah I will give it a go without the AC running at some point. I would have thought setting a slightly warmer temp in the car than is indicated outside does not necessarily mean HVAC heating is in use. Good tip about the regenerative being off above 90% charge BTW. I found this article about the regenerative braking dots. Seemingly I would have had the double whammy of full & cold battery when I set off. This most likely lead to the initial 220Wh/km that I saw for the first 45min or so.
 
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Candleflame

Active Member
Mar 9, 2015
3,296
1,782
QLD, Australia
It wasnt at full blast by any means. Only 15C yesterday in Southern Vic. So was heating the cabin to 22C during the trip. Battery might have been a bit cooler than it wanted to be when I set off. So perhaps power was wasted warming it up during the first part of the drive. I read that home AC chargers cannot preheat the battery, whereas Superchargers can. My car has never seen a Supercharger. This would explain why in the range test videos they hang out near Supercharge stations.

yeah heating is way more inefficient than AC. Easy for me to say, I do not need heating all year, but it is better to just put the seat heaters on full blast and leave the cabin maybe at 18-19 degrees.
 

Vostok

Active Member
Jul 1, 2017
1,666
1,769
Sydney
I am still a little sceptical about heating being a significant cause of high consumption on yesterdays drive. Sit any car with glass sunroof outside, windows closed during the day in 15C and I would have thought radiation alone would heat the cabin to the mid 20s. Sure I understand if it really is cold out, but raising it from 15 to 22 with the assistance of the sun does not seem like a big ask.
Resistive heating is dumb, it doesn’t matter much how much temperature increase you are seeking, just turning it on will use a lot of power.

I have the original Gen 1 LEAF which has resistive heating (subsequent models have reverse cycle A/C) and turning on the heating reduces the range by about 20%. The LEAF has really efficient A/C (it only uses about 250W according to the dash energy meter) but its resistive heating uses ten times that.

We’ve already seen posts here about how much of a power hog the A/C is in Model 3, and its resistive heating might be similarly bad.
 

bay74

Member
Mar 27, 2018
207
179
Melbourne, Australia
I have ~135Wh/km average over about ~4600km, done since September 30, including a trip Mel-Adel return over Christmas. I noticed that on the freeway with AC on (basically the Adelaide trip), consumption was about 150-160 Wh/km.

The considerably lower long-term average was because we don't often need the AC here in Mel and I have never ever intentionally had the heater on (stupid thing comes on by itself, unwanted, on cool mornings when the AC was set to e.g. 23 the previous day; wish there were a "Heater OFF" button like there is for AC). Usually I set temp to LO and adjust fan speed manually for fresh air flow (fresh air being a bit scarce the last few days).

Sometimes I floor it but of course that only lasts a second or three and unless you are subsequently braking unnecessarily I would guess it's not really using much more energy than accelerating more slowly in arriving at the same speed (kinetic energy is the same then, and resistive losses musn't be significant; not like in an ICE ey!). Hence I don't bother with Chill Mode anymore.

Cheers, A.
 

ICUDoc

Active Member
May 19, 2015
1,747
1,227
Sydney NSW
I floor it but of course that only lasts a second or three and unless you are subsequently braking unnecessarily I would guess it's not really using much more energy
Yup- accelerating to a speed from which you then have to brake is a major waste of energy. You get really good at avoiding that with practice- quick wzzzz up to 60 then sit there...
 

Flatbat

Member
Nov 12, 2019
434
399
Melbourne
Resistive heating is dumb, it doesn’t matter much how much temperature increase you are seeking, just turning it on will use a lot of power.
How would you even know you have turned it on? Reducing the amount of cooling by raising the temp setting slightly does not mean the heating has to be on.
 

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