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BigTrailer

Member
Mar 18, 2021
70
55
Toronto, Canada
Unfortunately efficiency doesn't matter when the Ford has a big advantage in the battery size.
You probably care most about range in the scenario of a long road trip. And what determines how a car will perform better is not its total range, but its charge speed, charge curve, and efficiency of what it does with that electricity. The Model Y has the Mach E well under foot there.

You need an hour of charging to get the same ~200 miles the Model Y will get in ~30 minutes of super-charging.
 

MikeHolliday

Member
May 9, 2020
324
213
Worthington, Ohio
Something is off. In the middle of the video, Alex mentions the Y having an efficiency of 260 wh/mi. That should equate to 288 miles fully drained, or 276 at 0%. The Y didn't get close to that. The final efficiency numbers weren't posted but the Y would have to have 320 wh/mi to get 234 miles fully drained, or 305 wh/mi at 0%.

My car in 40F temps at 75 mph, 1 passenger, 60 lbs of luggage, heat on, 2 seat warmers, gets 290 wh/mi. This test was in 60F weather with the AC on, but good weather conditions. I don't know why the Y got such a low range unless the BMS isn't calibrated properly.
I think that so of these people drive with a bias... I have gone 300 miles in my AWD Model Y at 65mph and a few percentages of battery left.
 
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AlexHung

Member
Mar 13, 2021
135
122
Santa Cruz, CA
I think any one who perform range testing needs to first prove that they can replicate EPA figures (or close to). Otherwise we just have to take their words that their testing methodology/process is sound.
 
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MikeHolliday

Member
May 9, 2020
324
213
Worthington, Ohio
This would be a mistake. Perceived range anxiety is probably the biggest reason people don't buy Teslas (setting aside quality control issues). A 3/Y with a real-world 400 mile range would be an absolute game changer.
Once you take your first road trip Range Anxiety vanishes... Once I saw how accurate the car calculated range I was blown away. I was always within a percent up or down from where it stated arrival would be and generally I have a few percent more...
 
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Dennisis

Supporting Member
Feb 11, 2020
494
446
Tucson
But not if you simply use and believe the miles-remaining display. Here's a new owner who did just that.

Inaccurate Range Stressed New Owner

(I'm not yet an owner so I'm very glad to be here educating myself, hopefully averting the most common surprises/disappointments).
You're on the right track already, getting schooled up on the message boards so you know what to expect. Anyone just buying an EV at this point without trying to pick up the in's and out's in advance is just asking for trouble. As MikeHolliday mentioned, range anxiety is overblown IMHO. I've been across the western deserts, Sonoma, all over Utah, New Mexico, to the highest paved road in North America (Mt Evans, CO) and have had no issues (lots of regen on the way back down!). Others have crisscrossed the country regularly (on my list) - use the Nav and enjoy the charging stops! There are faster ways to get from point A to B but none better :)
 
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MikeHolliday

Member
May 9, 2020
324
213
Worthington, Ohio
I am willing to bet that the individual in "Inaccurate Range Stressed New Owner" was probably driving faster than they realized. First, EPA Range is based on a 60mph highway speed, if you doubt my word look it up. I took a trip on the last day of November in the Midwest with an outside air temperature in the low 30s. I was running Climate Control at 71 degrees, we were listening to Streaming Music and I was running in Navigate on Autopilot. With a average speed around 70 mph occasionally higher when passing. As an example one leg was 200 miles, I left the Supercharger with a 90% SOC and arrived at my destination with 19%. So, 71% charge carried me 200 miles. They would yield 281 mile total.

I have driven 300 miles with no heat and had 3% SOC left upon arrival. But on my highway trips I am not driving 75 or 80 mph. By the way, I had a talk with my local SC about using the heat and air conditioner and the effect on range in my Model Y with a Heat Pump. They stated to have the best Range set the Climate Control on Automatic and leave it. They also stated that cranking the fan up will really make an impact on range. Also, for newbies, especially in winter, if you are going on a trip, plug your car into the wall adaptor set the Climate Control and set your departure time. The Car interior will be prewarmed and the Battery will be warmed by power from the Wall Connector vs the Battery after departure...

I use to drive a Mazda CX-5 on business trips, If I drove it from Worthington, Ohio to St. Louis, Missouri at exactly 65 mph it would yield 36mpg, but if I had to make the trip in a hurry, which I did a few times, and drove close to 80 mph the entire trip my mileage dropped to about 27mpg, that is a 25% reduction in fuel economy which translates to range.
 

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