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Tesla Model Y - Things You Should Know!

That may be an option. It depends on the lease terms and also requires him to either have the cash or get a loan to buy out the lease. I’ve seen some leases that don’t allow a buy out or that have an inordinately high buy out price.

Due to the high resale prices, Tesla quit offering buy-outs on leases lately and always keeps the car when you're done (because they can do the math too and know that owning is superior right now)
 
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Due to the high resale prices, Tesla quit offering buy-outs on leases lately and always keeps the car when you're done (because they can do the math too and know that owning is superior right now)
oops - misread your post. I thought you said he should buy out the lease! Yes, buying definitely would have been better for him. Either way, if he really hates the car that much he's done with it at the end of the lease.
 

Kairide

Member
Jul 13, 2021
997
1,066
CA
Actually he would have been much better served to have bought rather than leased, since used Model Y's sell for thousands more than the 2021 purchase prices. Being locked into a fixed contract on a car he doesn't even like and has no ownership position in is a definite inferior position.
It's easy to say this 2 years later. Since the OP leased in September 2020, this was prior to all of the supply chain shortages and Tesla price increases. No one was expecting the supply chain issues and that car prices would inflate this much. Dealerships were still worried that people wouldn't be buying vehicles because of the pandemic so they were discounting and giving great deals. Also, Tesla at that time still allowed lease sales to 3rd party dealerships.
If you're unsure about a new vehicle, and especially with EVs, a new technology, leasing is a good way of testing the waters. If you hate it, you turn the car in and aren't left with a deprecating asset. If you love it, you'd either buy the lease out if possible or just buy a new version when your lease is up.
I leased my MS in 2018 because I didn't know the future of Tesla or EVs. This was before the M3 was released so Tesla was still walking the line of being successful or going belly up. I didn't want to own an $85K vehicle from a company if they no longer existed in a year. Three years later leasing ended up being great, bought out the lease with the low residual set in 2018.

"Being locked into a fixed contract on a car he doesn't even like and has no ownership position in is a definite inferior position" - unless you're paying cash, you fall in to this category if you lease or take out a loan. Lease or lien, you don't own the vehicle.
 
exactly, I should have mentioned that. It and the range of most Teslas and reliability of the drivetrain (for most owners) made and still make EV’s practical.
A car with 220 miles of EPA and an unreliable charger network wouldn’t allow me to do my work, even though it doesn’t require an unusual amount of driving.
The car bodies and interiors to me seem about like a Toyota at best and in some ways dont quite rise to even that standard.
We traded a 2016 Prius for the Model Y and actually, the Prius's interior was not nearly as nice as the Model Y's. Granted, I appreciate minimalist design and perhaps others do not. The Prius was hard to keep clean, too busy, and the sight lines were absolutely horrible. It was a blind spot car. Like every direction you looked! The mileage was great for a gas car, but that was it.
 
Believe what you wish. That's not what the physics formulas say. Calculate your minimum hydroplane speed (9 X square root of tire pressure). Stay below that speed and you won't hydroplane. Go above it and you might, if water depth is enough. Width of your tire doesn't enter into it. It's very tempting to believe various other factors are at play. Science says they are not.
I've never understood why some drivers don't slow down when it's raining, especially when the road first gets wet. This is a basic teaching in driver's ed for a reason. It's not that hard to avoid hydroplaning regardless of your car or your tires. Just slow the f- down. Same is true on a motorcycle. Assess the situation and modify your driving/riding to match those conditions.
 

advocate8

Active Member
Nov 12, 2019
1,084
1,640
Maryland
I've never understood why some drivers don't slow down when it's raining, especially when the road first gets wet. This is a basic teaching in driver's ed for a reason. It's not that hard to avoid hydroplaning regardless of your car or your tires. Just slow the f- down. Same is true on a motorcycle. Assess the situation and modify your driving/riding to match those conditions.
Yes, it is physics but... not rocket science.
 

Undecided_2

Member
Supporting Member
Jan 21, 2022
526
374
Helensburgh
I've never understood why some drivers don't slow down when it's raining, especially when the road first gets wet. This is a basic teaching in driver's ed for a reason. It's not that hard to avoid hydroplaning regardless of your car or your tires. Just slow the f- down. Same is true on a motorcycle. Assess the situation and modify your driving/riding to match those conditions.
I learnt on a motorcycle and that taught me a lot about riding in the rain, snow, sleet, ice etc. My mantra: Good condition tires and ride/drive to the conditions and everyone else is an idiot so avoid them. Especially, if it rains just after a dry spell. It still does my head in when people don’t adjust their speed in heavy rain or when there are pools of water on the highways. The only times I’ve hydroplaned is when driving to fast in the rain. I haven’t done that on a bike, yet, as it’s game over unless your Rossi!

“IMO, it’s extremely rare to be the cars fault. I’ve driven some real crap and as long as the tires are good and I’m not driving to fast for the rain, no hydroplaning.

Waaaaah, I hydroplaned and it’s the cars fault, not mine!” Whatever.
 
I learnt on a motorcycle and that taught me a lot about riding in the rain, snow, sleet, ice etc. My mantra: Good condition tires and ride/drive to the conditions and everyone else is an idiot so avoid them. Especially, if it rains just after a dry spell. It still does my head in when people don’t adjust their speed in heavy rain or when there are pools of water on the highways. The only times I’ve hydroplaned is when driving to fast in the rain. I haven’t done that on a bike, yet, as it’s game over unless your Rossi!

“IMO, it’s extremely rare to be the cars fault. I’ve driven some real crap and as long as the tires are good and I’m not driving to fast for the rain, no hydroplaning.

Waaaaah, I hydroplaned and it’s the cars fault, not mine!” Whatever.
My favorite are the clowns (in Chicago) that push the speed limit on highways while there’s a foot of snow on the ground because they have 4 wheel drive and feel they are invincible forgetting for some reason they brake the same as any other vehicle. Umphh
 
My favorite are the clowns (in Chicago) that push the speed limit on highways while there’s a foot of snow on the ground because they have 4 wheel drive and feel they are invincible forgetting for some reason they brake the same as any other vehicle. Umphh
I drove an A4 Quattro prior to my MY and in both of the vehicles I found it easy to be deceived. AWD with traction control makes for a very sure start but they don’t stop any better than any other car. With the Y especially you need to be careful because it’s so heavy.
 
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My wife is paranoid about the car and lack of buttons and needing to use the screen for everything. I'm hoping there are some easy to use voice commands (wiper speeds, etc) that will alleviate this as I'd like for her to drive it a couple times a week to get used to it, as there will be times where I need to take her SUV in for service and she'll need to drive the Y.

But...seriously...paranoid after test driving it.
There is a learning curve and acclimation period that’s for sure. But the lack of buttons is a non issue.
 
There is a learning curve and acclimation period that’s for sure. But the lack of buttons is a non issue.
I wouldn't say it's a non issue - using the touchscreen controls in my MY is definitely not as easy as in our other cars that have physical buttons, especially since the V11 'update.'

Touch screens are at an intrinsic disadvantage because of the lack of tactical feedback. This can be ameliorated by good design and certainly isn't a dealbreaker, though.
 
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Undecided_2

Member
Supporting Member
Jan 21, 2022
526
374
Helensburgh
There is a learning curve and acclimation period that’s for sure. But the lack of buttons is a non issue.
At first it was annoying but once set up we barely touch the screen for car functions while driving.

Spotify is causing the most issues as it regularly just shows a spinning icon if I navigate away to another song/album as if logging in again. We have to change source and go back again but we lose where we were listening to. Sometimes I have to switch language and back to force it to work. #firstworldproblems
 
Just some additional information: I hydroplaned twice with my RWD Model S in the past two years. My tires were fine though because Tesla checked them after I let them know what happened. My car got some software updates since then and the hydroplaning issue had not occurred after that. I hope it never does again...not fun at all to go through that.
Your software update has zero to do with hydroplaning. Chalk that up to coincidence. It's all about speed, tire pressure and depth of water. Software doesn't override physics.
 

nate704

Active Member
Apr 20, 2021
1,284
1,198
Virginia
Wait - can I blame the hydroplaning on Tesla not updating the software?
Hydroplaning had nothing to do with the software updates unless the software limits the car speed less than 25 mph when raining, but then again, even at that low speed, cars with bald tires, a lot of water on the road surface, tire pressure, etc. can cause crash/issues regardless of software/no software.
 
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Hydroplaning had nothing to do with the software updates unless the software limits the car speed less than 25 mph when raining, but then again, even at that low speed, cars with bald tires, a lot of water on the road surface, tire pressure, etc. can cause crash/issues regardless of software/no software.
F5AB81F3-73AE-41A0-AD5E-809FC022A207.jpeg
 
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Hydroplaning had nothing to do with the software updates unless the software limits the car speed less than 25 mph when raining, but then again, even at that low speed, cars with bald tires, a lot of water on the road surface, tire pressure, etc. can cause crash/issues regardless of software/no software.
but wait... If I can't blame it on the software update, and I can't blame it on the software not updating how am I supposed to blame Tesla for it?
 

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