TMC is an independent, primarily volunteer organization that relies on ad revenue to cover its operating costs. Please consider whitelisting TMC on your ad blocker or making a Paypal contribution here: paypal.me/SupportTMC

Tesla Motors Announces Major European Distribution Center in the Netherlands

Discussion in 'Tesla Motors' started by NigelM, Dec 12, 2012.

  1. NigelM

    NigelM Recovering Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2011
    Messages:
    13,234
    Location:
    Sarasota, FL
    Today:

     
  2. jcstp

    jcstp Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Messages:
    1,627
    Location:
    Belgium
    Tesla Motors opens European Distribution Center in Tilburg (Netherlands)

    Tesla Motors opent Europees Distributie Centrum in Tilburg - Brabantse Ontwikkelings Maatschappij

    Via googletranslate :

     
  3. wstuff

    wstuff Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2012
    Messages:
    176
    Location:
    florida
    I also read this report on Ameritrade this morning, it also mentioned that cars were going to be assembled there. The european market is going to be HUfor tesla. Europeans are far greener than we are and much more readily adapted to EV's. I think they are going to fly off the shelves there.HUGE
     
  4. AustinPowers

    AustinPowers Total Smeghead

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2012
    Messages:
    1,068
    Location:
    Frankfurt, Germany
    #4 AustinPowers, Dec 13, 2012
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2012
    Don't bet on it!

    The European market on the whole may be huge, but the market for luxury vehicles like the Model S is not only quite small, but also very demanding.
    Many of the shortcomings of the S on the features front (and I am only referring to actual annoyances that come to the surface now that the first cars have been delivered - like the wiper mess, door handle problems - especially in cold weather, the lack of proper interior storage, the wear and tear on the leather edges on the B-pillar etc.) that we early adopters might be willing to accept are no-goes for most prospective buyers in that segment.
    And that doesn't even take into account the many features the S doesn't even offer that are considered necessary/desirable to successfully compete in the luxury segment (technically Tesla might call it a "premium" sedan, but as far as pricing is concerned it is a luxury vehicle).

    And even though it might be correct that Europeans in general are "greener" than Americans (even though I'm not even sure that this generalization holds true any more), many people in the market for such expensive cars don't care as much about fuel costs / environmental impact of their cars. Otherwise luxury automakers here wouldn't sell ever more cars with ever more horsepower.

    And think about the incentives for EV's, that some countries offer but many others don't. At least for the German market (which is one of the largest in Europe) I can say that the Model S will seem like a possibly attractive but very expensive proposition that only few people will be able to afford. And whether those people will actually consider buying an EV by an American newcomer car company with little track record over their usual Merc/BMW/Audi etc. is open to speculation.

    I do agree that the S will fly off the shelves in countries like Norway or the Netherlands, where EV's are highly subsidized/incentivized. But those are even smaller markets than the European luxury market itself.
     
  5. Yggdrasill

    Yggdrasill Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2012
    Messages:
    2,293
    Location:
    Kongsberg, Norway
    I think Tesla will probably sell somewhere between 2000 and 5000 Model S per year here in Norway. The biggest problems with the Model S for selling it here is the lack of tow hitch and AWD. Things like lack of top-end features doesn't matter that much, because the Tesla Model S is competing against cars like the VW Passat, Toyota Avensis, Skoda Octavia, Ford Mondeo, Toyota Prius, etc.

    TCO over 200 000 km/8 years disregarding maintenance, insurance, remaining value, toll road fees, ferry fees and parking:

    85 kWh Tesla Model S including tech package:
    Purchase cost: $86,000
    Electricity: $4,000
    Annual fees: $550

    60 kWh Tesla Model S including tech package:
    Purchase cost: $76,000
    Electricity: $4,000
    Annual fees: $550

    40 kWh Tesla Model S including tech package:
    Purchase cost: $66,000
    Electricity: $4,000
    Annual fees: $550

    VW Passat cheapest 5-door no optionals:
    Purchase cost: $51,300
    Fuel: $18,600
    Annual fees: $3850

    Toyota Avensis cheapest 5-door no optionals:
    Purchase cost: $46,400
    Fuel: $30,300
    Annual fees: $3850

    Skoda Octavia cheapest 5-door no optionals:
    Purchase cost: $40,900
    Fuel: $26,600
    Annual fees: $3850

    Ford Modeo cheapest 5-door no optionals:
    Purchase cost: $38,100
    Fuel: $14,700
    Annual fees: $3850

    Toyota Prius cheapest 5-door no optionals:
    Purchase cost: $46,500
    Fuel: $18,200
    Annual fees: $3850

    To sum up, arranged by price:

    85 kWh Tesla Model S: $90,550
    Toyota Avensis: $80,550
    60 kWh Tesla Model S: $80,550
    VW Passat: $73,750
    Skoda Octavia: $71,350
    40 kWh Tesla Model S: $70,550
    Toyota Prius: $68,550
    Ford Modeo: $56,650

    Around 15,000 of the mentioned fossil cars are sold in total each year, and I am sure Tesla will seem like a very competitive alternative, so 5000 is not impossible. Especially as I've compared the price of the most basic models with a fairly well equipped Model S. And I haven't factored in that electric cars are exempt from road toll fee, ferry fees, parking fees, and will probably have lower maintenance costs and lower depreciation. And they can drive in the car pool lanes. But most of these other cars are for the most part *primary cars*, used to drive furniture to cabins and the like, so lack of tow hitch and AWD will affect sales. How much remains to be seen.
     
  6. widodh

    widodh Model S R231 EU

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2011
    Messages:
    4,815
    Location:
    Middelburg, The Netherlands
    Again, we are going very offtopic directly :) It keeps getting back to the pricing of various cars vs the Model S.

    I know it's a hot-topic, but still.

    ONTOPIC:

    I'm actually proud as a fellow dutchman to see Tesla open the European Distribution Center in the Netherlands.

    The choice for Tilburg seems to be a good one.

    It's:
    * Surrounded by highways leading into the country and Belgium and Germany
    * Close to the port of Rotterdam
    * A lower-cost area then Rotterdam

    The only down-side is that it's not that well connected to the rail system. For example the Betuweroute.

    Still, very cool to see this become true! I heard this from George Blankenship earlier this year, but it was still to be seen if they would actually open it.

    I assume they will have Panasonic ship the batteries to Tilburg directly instead of going to Fremont first, that saves a HUGE amount of shipping.

    Same could go for the rims and tires?
     
  7. Yggdrasill

    Yggdrasill Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2012
    Messages:
    2,293
    Location:
    Kongsberg, Norway
    I doubt Panasonic will ship anything directly to the Netherlands. Rememer, they ship cells, not completed battery packs. The battery packs are assembled in Fremont. It's more possible rims and tires are shipped directly to the Netherlands.
     
  8. widodh

    widodh Model S R231 EU

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2011
    Messages:
    4,815
    Location:
    Middelburg, The Netherlands
    Ah, indeed. I forgot that.

    I doubt that Tesla is going to assemble the battery packs in Tilburg, maybe in a later stage.
     
  9. doug

    doug Administrator / Head Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2006
    Messages:
    15,876
    Location:
    Stanford, California
    Actually I think the point would be to assemble the packs more locally.
     
  10. VolkerP

    VolkerP EU Model S P-37

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2011
    Messages:
    2,452
    Location:
    Germany
    Seems to be the same weird thing as with solar modules. These are installed with a bypass diode. But that is a semiconductor, which have a high customs (douane/Zoll?) penalty. So the module is imported without the diode which is soldered in place afterwards.
     
  11. PeterB

    PeterB Member

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    Messages:
    42
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    #11 PeterB, Dec 14, 2012
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2012
    "Tesla plans to utilize this facility for vehicle importing operations, final vehicle assembly and distribution"

    There seems to be some conflicting reporting on a variety of news sites about what exactly is meant by final vehicle assembly.

    I'm not clear how they could possibly be actually building the cars in a 62k sq ft facility that is also their parts warehouse for Europe.

    I'm assuming for now this is just for installing any market specific requirements on cars that are shipped from Fremont.
     
  12. mknox

    mknox Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2012
    Messages:
    8,444
    Location:
    Toronto, ON
  13. Lyon

    Lyon 2012 S P85, 2016 X P90D

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2011
    Messages:
    1,982
    Location:
    Eugene, Oregon
    It makes a lot of sense to have some kind of final prep and distribution center in Europe. I doubt that it will truly be more than simply applying paint armor, detailing and making sure that all the correct warning stickers are in place. Frankly, that, along with the distribution of parts and the maintenance aspect of this is going to occupy the 50 people they're planning on hiring.

    I do wonder, however, if they put the battery packs and motors in there is the car would be subject to less import tax? You know, ship the rolling chassis and the power train separately.
     
  14. AnOutsider

    AnOutsider S532 # XS27

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2009
    Messages:
    11,923
    Sort of like they did with the roadster only backwards
     
  15. EcoHeliGuy

    EcoHeliGuy Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2012
    Messages:
    545
    Location:
    Canada

    When I first read the press release this was my thoughts as well. Do final assembly, and test drive in Europe for importation taxes. They might ship over chassis and install wheels, battery's ect.

    what I'm interested to know is, did tesla decide that a build to order option including the time it takes to ship across the ocean was to great of a gap? I doubt it, but maybe they plan ship over painted bodies and install all the options in Europe.

    I feel it's just a parts warehouse, Europe head office, and final inspection facility.
     

Share This Page