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Tesla mounting "aftermarket tires" (also check out this tire wear!!!)

Discussion in 'Model S: Driving Dynamics' started by porshuh, May 31, 2016.

  1. porshuh

    porshuh Member

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    I had planned on getting the Tesla Service Center to mount and balance new tires for me during my annual. I received a short notice surprise when they told me that the Hankook Ventus V12 tires I've ordered they would refuse to touch because it is an "aftermarket part"....meaning they aren't the exact same tire brand and model that came with the car new from the factory. Has anyone had this similar experience?? I want to use these tires because they are not only way cheaper (about $800 for a full set (21")), but I've had tons of miles on them on other cars in the past, and really love their performance per cost.

    Also, check out these pictures of my rear tire wear! I argued with Tesla at delivery that the alignment specs they gave me with the car are going to chew through tires, but they said it was within spec and confirmed that it would result in "normal" tire wear. There's about 4/32's on the outside, and down past the cords on the inside. And weird funky angle on the inside is at about 30 degrees...

    So if they can't do the mount and balance. Does anyone know a good shop in the Northern VA / DC area to get tires mounted and balanced (and I assume an alignment while I'm at it)?
     

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  2. 182RG

    182RG Free The Service Manuals From Tyranny

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    You probably want to read this thread. I came across it surfing:

    Upper Rear Link Build (Reduces rear camber to improve tire wear)

    The rear camber, apparently, isn't adjustable on the Model S leading to uneven wear down to the cords on the inside shoulders of the rear tires. Some of the enterprising individuals in this thread worked with a machine shop to machine an adjustable set of upper rear links so that camber can be reduced. This yielded a doubling of the life of a set of tires in some reported cases. I believe the part is $1,000 - $1,200 plus whatever you would have to pay to have it installed and aligned.

    If you want to make the trek out to Winchester, I've used Buettner Tire Distributors for 20+ years. They handle Hankook tires, and have an alignment and maintenance shop. Not difficult to get appointments.

    Good luck!
     
    • Informative x 1
  3. porshuh

    porshuh Member

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    That's VERY interesting info. I had no idea it was that widespread an issue. I'm going to get an alignment shop to deal with it as best they can (making sure there is zero toe all around), and see how many miles I can get out of my new tires...which

    BY THE WAY - you can easily fit 275/30/21 Hankook Ventus V12 evo2 tires on the rear. They have a 320 (vs 220) treadwear rating, and are only $237 per tire (vs $355). This is comparing to the Michelin Pilot Sport 2. I had the Hankooks on my Corvette, and got EXCELLENT performance and longevity out of them for their price.
     
  4. iffatall

    iffatall Member

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    Is this issue only on performance models, or only on 21" tires, or on all combinations?
     
  5. 182RG

    182RG Free The Service Manuals From Tyranny

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    Ah, so are they a different "size" than factory 21s? Tesla SC refusing to install for that makes more sense, than just brand. Kind of like the Costco rules on size different from factory sizes. They will not mount them on a vehicle.
     
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  6. dhanson865

    dhanson865 Active Member

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    If you decide the wear still isn't what you want I'd seriously consider dropping to 20" or 19" wheels and adjusting the tire size to match. Try and find the diameter of the OEM tiers and revs per mile to match as close as possible the diameter/rpm and pick and choose the tires you want on smaller wheels.
     
  7. DFiveK2

    DFiveK2 Member

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    Poor form from Tesla.

    Any auto shop can mount wheels and tires for you. Here in Tesla wasteland (250+ miles from nearest SC) they tell me to use any shop nearby to mount tires and or wheels.
     
  8. AmpedRealtor

    AmpedRealtor Active Member

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    The question I have is will Tesla rotate OEM wheels containing aftermarket tires?
     
  9. scottm

    scottm Active Member

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    Why have Tesla do anything with tires and wheels that need replacing?

    It's a waste of their time and yours.

    Tesla SC are not a tire shop, or alignment shop.
     
  10. CSFTN

    CSFTN Member

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    I was looking to buy a set of BBS UP-01 with PSS tires... inquired with Nashville SC, they told me they wouldn't touch them, including they wouldn't rotate them.
     
  11. Uncle Paul

    Uncle Paul Member

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    Tesla ran into lots of issues with customers self installing non approved aftermarket tires.

    Some did not have sufficient load bearing capacity, speed rating, handling control, traction, etc to play well with the Tesla traction and stability control.

    If a Tesla crashes due to the tires, Tesla will be the one all over the news for unsafe vehicles.

    Some came in with miss matched tires on the front and rear, smaller or larger tread patterns, lots of things that were cause for concern.

    It is perhaps understandable that they will want to get a handle on this before taking on the liability.
     
  12. jcaspar

    jcaspar Member

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    Totally agree. Can't understand why anyone goes to the dealer for tire replacement?!?!

     
  13. CSFTN

    CSFTN Member

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    Use the dealer for tires as Tesla''s tire lugs are incredibly soft, and strip unless handled properly. Dealer say not allowed to use any power tools to remove - all done by hand only.

    Firestone replaced a tire, then had to bring back as they didn't balance it. In that 2 times of taking of and putting on the lugs, they stripped them. Tesla had to drill them off.
     
  14. 182RG

    182RG Free The Service Manuals From Tyranny

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    #14 182RG, Jun 9, 2016
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2016
    Umm...something that requires 129 ft. lbs. of torque shouldn't be soft, sorry. That's higher than a lot of vehicles and on par with most high performance cars. If true, the factory lugs should be thrown away and replaced with a higher quality set.

    Think I found replacement lug nuts for the 21" wheels

    More "run to the dealer" nonsense. With some dealers out 4 weeks on appointments, it just doesn't make a whole lot of sense. Dealers are also generally a terrible place for tires and alignments (terrible for service quality and terrible for your wallet).
     
  15. TaoJones

    TaoJones Beyond Driven

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    So...

    1. America's Tire plugged a slow leak recently for an OEM tire. They specifically noted the 2-part, soft lug nut assemblies, said they had "swelled", and tapped them out of the socket with a hammer.

    2. Tesla SvC will rotate tires if they are exactly the same as OEM. Whether it is free or not seems to be SvC-specific.

    3. Mounting and balancing similarly ranges from free to $125 to $200/set. Caveat emptor and find the SvC that offers the best deal before you have Tire Rack deliver a set to wherever.

    Here's the concern: Having Tesla rotate tires is a Good Idea because there's less chance of problems ranging from hosed lug nuts to door dings. However, by Tesla's own tire pricing (Goodyear Eagles 50%-100% more than elsewhere) and mounting/balancing charges ($200/set versus elsewhere), and the lack of certs, you can quickly tell that they don't want to be in the tire business. Soooooooooo.... Good luck.
     
  16. sorka

    sorka Active Member

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    I didn't realize that but it so happens I've always used a breaker to loosen and then spin them off and on by hand because I don't want to scratch the paint on the inside of the lug holes.
     
  17. HyperMiler

    HyperMiler Member

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    Lolachampcar and Linkster have written this up in great detail. Alignment settings are crucial to avoid premature tire wear.
     
  18. 3mp_kwh

    3mp_kwh Member

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    Beyond that, giving up the ability to rotate fundamentally reduces the life you'll get out of your rears. They will wind up like most, with their insides rubbed off. The cars come with at least a degree of negative camber, and it increases as you lower. This has all been exhaustively covered.

    For P85+, or RWD, you can turn off traction control and exploit more power on exit. For all of the AWD cars, Tesla doesn't allow you to take advantage of the extra grip even 245's could provide (full-time nanny). The cars have a power kill until the steering wheel is straight. So, the only point in upsizing would be marginally more lateral grip, at entry, or launch. Even then, I don't think it was ever proven that a >245 width is out-dragged by something wider? My Conti Silents are ready to do more than the car allows, and I have a stack of PS2's and the equipment I'd need if I wanted to change 'um out. Not much point, to me. I've run PS2's at Watkins Glen, in a different car. Great tire, but here I wonder if all I would net was a noisier ride?

    Tesla needs to yield more driving control to those who can take responsibility. Then, we can talk about tires ;)
     

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