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Tesla owners: How strong is regenerative braking?

Discussion in 'Model 3' started by insaneoctane, Jul 27, 2017.

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  1. insaneoctane

    insaneoctane Member

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    I own a non-tesla EV which applies regenerative braking via the brake pedal. I understand tesla only applies friction brakes via brake pedal. How much deceleration do you experience by just lifting the accelerator?
     
  2. shrspeedblade

    shrspeedblade Member

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    I don't own a Tesla, but having rented one for a couple of days I would say it was about on par with my second gen volt on high regen, but not as aggressive as using the steering wheel mounted paddle.
     
  3. KarenRei

    KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei

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    I'll add a followup: how easy is it to maintain a zero-throttle level on the accelerator for when one wants to coast down?
     
  4. shrspeedblade

    shrspeedblade Member

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    I guess after only two days it was easy enough I wasn't thinking about it any more and can't remember.:cool:
     
  5. KarenRei

    KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei

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    Literal zero throttle, or approximately zero?
     
  6. Yggdrasill

    Yggdrasill Active Member

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    It's not so easy. You need to be pretty exact. I've seen Tesla Bjørn put it into neutral, which allows it to coast. That seems easier.
     
  7. KarenRei

    KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei

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    I'll probably end up doing that a lot ;) I'm somewhat of a hypermiler and prefer to coast down wherever possible.
     
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  8. commasign

    commasign Active Member

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    Except for panic situations, I only use the brake pedal when coming to a complete stop. Otherwise, pretty much all city and highway driving can be done 1 pedal.
     
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  9. SabrToothSqrl

    SabrToothSqrl Active Member

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    Stronger than the flash. Not as strong as Super Man.
     
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  10. JonathanD

    JonathanD Member

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    Nah you won't. Once you get used to the regen you'll begin naturally timing your stopping distances. It becomes second nature after a bit.
     
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  11. LoL Rick

    LoL Rick Like Buttah

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    #11 LoL Rick, Jul 27, 2017
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2017
    It's about the same as a Nissan Leaf in B mode, or with your foot lightly pressing the brake pedal. However, in a Tesla, regen stops at about 4mph so you will have to use the friction brakes for the last little bit.

    About the coasting down - it can be done but it gets tiring on the foot. If you're a true hypermiler, you'll probably want to shift to neutral. One cool feature of the shift lever, at least on S & X, is that you can shift no N by either pressing up or down. So if you get in the habit of pressing down, there's no danger of overshooting and hitting R. Above a certain speed it won't shift to R anyway, but still better to safe.
     
  12. KarenRei

    KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei

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    What's that supposed to mean? "Timing stopping distances" is what coastdown is about.

    Regen loses energy. Not as much as friction braking, but it's still a loss. A hypermiler tries to avoid it.
     
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  13. FlatSix911

    FlatSix911 918 Hybrid

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    #13 FlatSix911, Jul 27, 2017
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2017
    Two levels of Regen are available and can be selected from the main control display :cool:

    upload_2017-7-27_7-51-3.png
     
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  14. JonathanD

    JonathanD Member

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    Uh, I guess if you're desperate for a couple extra miles, but ultimately I think you'd be better off using the regen because it will be hard to time a "neutral coast" perfectly all the time, and then you wind up using the brakes which defeats the whole purpose. Also, dunno if it will be this way on the Model 3, but on Model S there are two different settings for regen. So you can use the less aggressive one if you want a compromise.
     
  15. Zextraterrestrial

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    It is really very easy to float the throttle at 0 power.
    and regen is about -.3 g max if I remember correct (been years since I checked that)
     
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  16. LoL Rick

    LoL Rick Like Buttah

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    Oh, wait a minute. Yours is a classic with that great big power indicator at the center of the binnacle. Mine is too. We have to hear from somebody with an autopilot car that has the display on the side. IMO, much less useful. And even that won't apply to the Model 3 which may or may not have the power display on the center screen. So I think we're back to "nobody knows for sure."
     
  17. Chris L

    Chris L Member

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    You don't have to "time" your stopping distances. You control your slowing speed the same way as your acceleration — pushing down or letting up some on the pedal. Push all the way down for maximum acceleration, and let all the way up for maximum magnetic deceleration, but for levels in between, you have to keep your foot on the pedal. Let up a little for a little magnetic braking, let up some more for more magnetic braking — it's not all or nothing as many seem to think. It's very nuanced. People who pop their foot off the pedal to engage "regen" would indeed have to time their stops, but that's engaging maximum magnetic braking and missing out on the exquisite braking control the car is capable of.

    Putting an electric car in neutral to "coast" is a little strange, because the motor is directly connected to the drive wheels all the time. There is no clutch or no mechanical neutral. The "neutral" is just an electrical neutral (no power in or out); you can do the same thing by moving the pedal to the spot in between power to the motor and power to the battery, and at the same time keeping control over the car's speed. You will likely want a little power going one way or the other. It's not something that needs to be over-thought. Increase efficiency by driving conservatively. No tricks required.
     
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  18. Boourns

    Boourns Member

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    You will either change your tune or be disappointed. Teslas are pretty much the least efficient EV out there. I expect the 3 to be a bit more efficient than the S, but it still won't touch the i3. It is still less than half the cost of a very fuel efficient EV, though, so my advice is to enjoy it. Trust me; I was a LEAF hypermiler in a past life. This is much more fun.
     
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  19. BerTX

    BerTX Active Member

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    As the previous owner of a gen1 Insight I can say that you will find other things to occupy your time than hypermiling. What you gain is negligible and it just isn't that much fun.

    As to the Regen, it truly is adequate but not annoying. I have no idea why it doesn't come to a complete stop -- maybe because they want you to move your foot over to the brake?

    I retired from hypermiling pretty quickly after acquiring some simple methods in case I'm in a situation where some extra range is needed. I pay more attention to route planning and charging levels than saving the pittance of energy hypermiling will gain. If hypermiling is your life, then get a different car.
     
  20. LoL Rick

    LoL Rick Like Buttah

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    It has to do with the design of the motor. Other companies use motors with permanent magnets, but Tesla does not. It actually takes some electric power to generate the magnetic component. So at low speeds you would be using more that you generate.
     

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