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Tesla removes regenerative braking strength option

Sam1

Active Member
Sep 11, 2019
1,447
1,440
NV
The regen option is completely gone on my new car, but it was there on my old car when I traded it in last week. Not that I ever changed it, but it was strange not seeing it in the menu. the only difference between the old and new car was that the old one was FSD (which never actually FSD'd).
 

oreobbq

Member
Jan 8, 2021
275
347
Houston
The regen option is completely gone on my new car, but it was there on my old car when I traded it in last week. Not that I ever changed it, but it was strange not seeing it in the menu. the only difference between the old and new car was that the old one was FSD (which never actually FSD'd).

Yea they removed the option to change it. Low regen is like warm soda though. But some people do miss it. 😂
 

Gauss Guzzler

Safety Score = 7
Dec 27, 2020
870
1,165
Thousand Oaks, California
Yep, the option is "grandfathered" in older cars but anything built after late 2020-ish has no regen options.

I'd actually like the option to *increase* regen and "Track Mode" has a nice slider interface for doing so - I love the way it drives with that maxed out but that's just me and everyone is different. Our feet only have so much resolution and the more power we have available the more pedal travel we need for smooth acceleration. Likewise the stronger the regen, the more pedal travel we need reserved for deceleration. So with strong acceleration *and* strong regen it's easy to exceed the resolution limits of our foot within the limits of a reasonable pedal travel range.

Tesla never explained the deleted option and some people speculate that EPA mileage ratings are now based on the worst-case setting which led Tesla to disable the poorer performing regen options in order to boost EPA scores. I doubt that and suspect it's simply a tuning issue with the car's ability to "seamlessly" fade in/out the mechanical brakes to bring the car to a one-pedal stop across a wide range of battery states and regen settings. And to illustrate my point, note that "Track Mode" gives you total control of the regen behavior, but only after disabling the <5mph brake blending.

IOW, I think Tesla might bring back regen adjustment options once they have some time to tune them.
 
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Watts_Up

Active Member
Mar 4, 2019
3,859
2,817
In a galaxy far, far away
Tesla never explained the deleted option and some people speculate that EPA mileage ratings are now based on the worst-case setting which led Tesla to disable the poorer performing regen options in order to boost EPA scores.
I would think that EPA would be based using any default setting, trying to determine the worst-case setting seems a little bit difficult to choose when there are so many other possible setting.
 

Sam1

Active Member
Sep 11, 2019
1,447
1,440
NV
IOW, I think Tesla might bring back regen adjustment options once they have some time to tune them.

There was a thread on twitter by Green where he got the box on a model 3 crashed in the snow. It appeared that the driver let off the throttle and as soon as he did, the rear axle locked up for a split second when regen kicked in and it caused him to spin and crash. I don't drive in the snow, but it seems that they need to leave the option in there specifically for that type of scenario.
 
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jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Moderator
Nov 28, 2018
12,497
14,891
Riverside Co. CA
There is a long thread here somewhere talking / complaining about this (several pages if I remember correctly). I couldnt find it with a quick search, though. Lots and lots of discussion around the "safety" angle.

In any case, as @Gauss Guzzler said, the ability to change the setting was removed at some point.

There was a lot of speculation around why, but it was just speculation. So, OP its not there, and tesla being tesla, I would not hold my breath on it returning in your new vehicle at any point. It "could" but I wouldnt expect it to.
 
There was a thread on twitter by Green where he got the box on a model 3 crashed in the snow. It appeared that the driver let off the throttle and as soon as he did, the rear axle locked up for a split second when regen kicked in and it caused him to spin and crash. I don't drive in the snow, but it seems that they need to leave the option in there specifically for that type of scenario.
I have said that here many times before and fully agree. The cars were obviously designed in California where they don't have to drive in the shitty North East US snow/ice storms.
 
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RacerChris

Member
Jan 3, 2020
116
72
Indiana
I have said that here many times before and fully agree. The cars were obviously designed in California where they don't have to drive in the shitty North East US snow/ice storms.
I agree - I still don't know what people would do in this situation. I turn mine down when I have to drive on ice/snow because it can create an unsafe condition in the regular setting.
 

Gauss Guzzler

Safety Score = 7
Dec 27, 2020
870
1,165
Thousand Oaks, California
I seriously doubt regen could cause the car to oversteer on ice. It doesn't just blindly slam on full regen - the traction control is always operating and providing vastly better braking than any ABS system ever could.

As regen is ramped up it will detect slippage faster than any car in the world ever has and will immediately back off accordingly to stay just below the skid threshold. All that in addition to one of the most advanced stability control systems ever. If you manage to spin one of these things it's because you are trying to drive in conditions that are simply not feasible with your tires.

I'd love to be proven wrong though, and with a half-million 3/Y's being driven on ice every day surely there must be at least one example of a Tesla oversteering in drivable conditions, right? Anyone know of one?
 

MasterC17

Active Member
Dec 3, 2015
1,377
2,146
USA
I seriously doubt regen could cause the car to oversteer on ice. It doesn't just blindly slam on full regen - the traction control is always operating and providing vastly better braking than any ABS system ever could.

As regen is ramped up it will detect slippage faster than any car in the world ever has and will immediately back off accordingly to stay just below the skid threshold. All that in addition to one of the most advanced stability control systems ever. If you manage to spin one of these things it's because you are trying to drive in conditions that are simply not feasible with your tires.

I'd love to be proven wrong though, and with a half-million 3/Y's being driven on ice every day surely there must be at least one example of a Tesla oversteering in drivable conditions, right? Anyone know of one?
The overwhelming majority of the crashed Tesla's I have seen where they spun out of control have had bald rear tires. You would be amazed at how neglectful people are of basic maintenance. Of course, this is only exacerbated in inclement weather. I think that is a much bigger issue than anything else.
 
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RacerChris

Member
Jan 3, 2020
116
72
Indiana
I seriously doubt regen could cause the car to oversteer on ice. It doesn't just blindly slam on full regen - the traction control is always operating and providing vastly better braking than any ABS system ever could.

As regen is ramped up it will detect slippage faster than any car in the world ever has and will immediately back off accordingly to stay just below the skid threshold. All that in addition to one of the most advanced stability control systems ever. If you manage to spin one of these things it's because you are trying to drive in conditions that are simply not feasible with your tires.

I'd love to be proven wrong though, and with a half-million 3/Y's being driven on ice every day surely there must be at least one example of a Tesla oversteering in drivable conditions, right? Anyone know of one?
Have you driven one on ice? I speak from experience - On slush/ice, hopping off the throttle to slow down has caused significant loss of grip and lack of stability.
 
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Gauss Guzzler

Safety Score = 7
Dec 27, 2020
870
1,165
Thousand Oaks, California
@RacerChris Does the Model 3 behave worse than other AWD cars with manual transmissions and similar tires? Any car is going to feel a little woozy if you're sloppy with the pedal but are you aware of one actually spinning as the result of throttle lift in safely drivable conditions?

The manual warns of loss of traction during regen but there's loss of traction due to anything, right? Braking, steering, accelerating, all cause loss of traction, and generally they are all handled well by the traction/stability control system. I understand the fear of automatic rear axle braking but I have to imagine that if this really were an issue there'd be spun Teslas all over the place and a huge NHTSA investigation seeking to find out why they put regen on the rear axle only and then deleted the option to disable it. That'd be a huge story, right?

Screenshot 2021-09-24 113042.png
 

SaintMickey®

Closed
Sep 19, 2021
117
56
USA
I'll miss this. When I see something strange near the road, I move my right foot to the brake pedal. I do this to be able to brake faster if it turns out the strange thing is a moose or something. That doesn't mean I want to decelerate with max regen.

I guess I could start driving like an American (left foot on the brake), but then I'll be handicapped when I use a stick shift.

Driving like "an American"...:rolleyes: No idea what that means and I know of no-one who uses left foot for the break.
 
Driving like "an American"...:rolleyes: No idea what that means and I know of no-one who uses left foot for the break.
I let my father in law test drive my M3, and the car kept throwing up these warnings. Turns out he was using his left foot to brake while still applying pressure to the accelerator. I had never seen anyone do it before either, but unless you were watching their feet I guess you wouldn’t realize it!
 
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Gauss Guzzler

Safety Score = 7
Dec 27, 2020
870
1,165
Thousand Oaks, California
Yeah with the conversion to automatic transmissions in mid-century America two-foot driving was considered to be the preferred technique for a few decades. The advantages are obvious but then they discovered that some people suck at driving. They don't release the brake so their brake lights stay on or flash erratically and the brakes overheat from long term dragging. There's also great risk of confusion when alternating between auto/manual transmissions but it wasn't until the 1980's that public campaigns and drivers-ed programs really began urging people to always use their right foot for braking.
 

SaintMickey®

Closed
Sep 19, 2021
117
56
USA
I let my father in law test drive my M3, and the car kept throwing up these warnings. Turns out he was using his left foot to brake while still applying pressure to the accelerator. I had never seen anyone do it before either, but unless you were watching their feet I guess you wouldn’t realize it!

The only time I use my left foot is if I REALLY have to stop to avoid collision or something. LOL - I haven't mastered anything other than hard break. Its amazing how much the left foot will stop a car. Can't really explain it...
 

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