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Tesla S With 85 kWh Pack - Charging Speeds.

Discussion in 'Australia & New Zealand' started by ElectricAutos, Dec 7, 2014.

  1. ElectricAutos

    ElectricAutos Member

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    Good Day Ladies and Gents.

    I worked out the following calculations for a Tesla S with an 85 kWh battery pack and would appreciate confirmation that they are correct.

    The Tesla S comes standard with a 10 kW on-board AC charger or an optional dual AC charger capable of drawing 20 kW of electricity.

    The S has a car side IEC62196 Type 2 (Mennekes) socket that will accept a Type 2 connector. The standard AC charger will add around 56 km to the range of the Tesla S per hour of charge and will fully charge the Tesla S from "flat" in around eight hours. The dual AC charger will add around 112 km to the range of the Tesla S per hour of charge and fully charge the Tesla S from "flat" in around four hours.

    The range of the Tesla Model S with an 85 kWh battery pack at freeway speeds (100 km per hour) is around 450 km. This assumes that 95% of the battery (80.8 kWh) is available before the car goes into power saving mode.

    Are these figures accurate. Thanks in advance :smile:.
     
  2. Dborn

    Dborn Confirmed

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    I believe the realistic range is less than that. 390 to 420. I have read somewhere that only about 75Kw are available, bearing in mind other losses including air con and the electronics. The car uses about 1KwH for 5km. There are also losses with charging due to heat etc. The wall connectors are not 100% efficient. So your figures are close but very optimistic.
     
  3. ElectricAutos

    ElectricAutos Member

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    The standard in most electric cars is that the usable kWh is around 70/80% of the total battery pack capacity but some of the S drivers in the States have reported 80.1 kWh availability which is around 95% of the battery pack. I don't think Tesla have reported any figures for this. The information comes from unofficial sources.
     
  4. Mark E

    Mark E Member

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    More like 76kWh - look at First NZ Model S - Page 8
     
  5. SteveWest

    SteveWest 2012 Roadster 2.5, 2014 P85+, 2015 P85D

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    With regards to charging speed, a reasonably accurate rule of thumb is that you gain 1 km of range per hour for every amp x phase at 230 V.
     
  6. ElectricAutos

    ElectricAutos Member

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    By way of comparison the Holden Volt has a 16.5 kWh battery pack of which 10.5 kWh is usable. This gives a range of 60-70 km at freeway speeds.

    The attached photo shows a journey which took place mostly on the freeway consisting of 60.9 km on the battery and 14.2 km on the petrol range extender. This gives average petrol consumption of 1.1L for the trip. This car is averaging 2.9L per 100 km because it is used mostly in urban areas and is charged frequently.

    DSC_0075_resized.jpg
     
  7. Lerxt

    Lerxt Member

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    Based on my experience of a mix of freeway/city driving 60/40 my realistic power usage is about 220Wh/km so about 390km realistic range. On the highway at 80kmh you'll do 200wh/km.
     
  8. Sad

    Sad Member

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    220 Wh/km would mean much less than 390, more like 330/340.
     
  9. Lerxt

    Lerxt Member

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    85000/220 = 386
     
  10. markwj

    markwj Moderator, Asia Pacific

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    Yeah, but an 85kWh pack doesn't have 85kWh available to the user.
     
  11. Sad

    Sad Member

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    Usable capacity is around 75 kWh. Another approach is to use the rated km assumed energy consumption, which I think is around 185 Wh/km, and multiply your rated range (probably around 400) by 185/220.
     

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