TMC is an independent, primarily volunteer organization that relies on ad revenue to cover its operating costs. Please consider whitelisting TMC on your ad blocker and becoming a Supporting Member. For more info: Support TMC
Start a Discussionhttps://teslamotorsclub.com/tmc/tags/

Blog Tesla Semi Said to Have 200-300 Miles of Range

Discussion in 'Tesla' started by TMC Staff, Aug 24, 2017.

  1. TMC Staff

    Joined:
    May 19, 2017
    Messages:
    219
    Scott Perry, an executive at Miami-based fleet operator Ryder System Inc., spilled some details on the upcoming Tesla semi during an interview with Reuters. Perry said the truck is expected to have a range of 200-300 miles, which would most likely suit regional hauling efforts. Perry said he received the details in a meeting earlier...
    READ FULL ARTICLE
     
  2. KarenRei

    KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2017
    Messages:
    1,365
    Location:
    Iceland
    Not just regional haul if Tesla can keep supercharging times on semis down. In Europe especially, where you have to have 45 minutes of break for every 4 1/2 hours of driving regardless. Can't wait to see their charge solutions.
     
  3. oktane

    oktane Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2016
    Messages:
    1,496
    Location:
    USA
    Would be interested to know the typical distance a semi-truck travels in a day. To me, it sounds way too short to be useful. Is this range at full load?

    I'd expect most semi truck drivers cover at least 500 miles every day non-stop.
     
  4. Tam

    Tam Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2012
    Messages:
    2,866
    Location:
    Visalia, CA
    Do they wear a diaper for such a 500 mile non-stop trip :)
     
  5. oktane

    oktane Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2016
    Messages:
    1,496
    Location:
    USA
    Haha some probably do....or a Travel John more likely. Time = money!
     
  6. stopcrazypp

    stopcrazypp Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2007
    Messages:
    9,282
    I'm guessing that's why they said regional haul. Long haul trucks obviously travel longer between fuel stops.
     
  7. four-walling

    four-walling Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2017
    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    SoCal
    It Depends.
     
    • Funny x 6
    • Like x 1
  8. Tam

    Tam Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2012
    Messages:
    2,866
    Location:
    Visalia, CA
    I prefer to have at least 500 mile range for myself so I have an option to skip a Supercharger or two which would save time.
     
    • Like x 1
  9. cpa

    cpa Active Member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2014
    Messages:
    1,514
    Location:
    Central Valley
    Federal rules allow eleven hours behind the wheel before a mandatory eight-hour break. I think there is a second rule (gotta check with some clients) that allows eight hours with a four hour break before granting another six hours or so. But I could be wrong on the second one.

    Could it be possible that the trailers have battery storage in addition to the tractors? That way the drivers can leave with a full charge, drive their 200-250 miles, say, drop off the trailer, pick up a new fully-charged trailer and return?

    Five hundred miles in one day, including down time switching trailers could easily be done in fewer than 11 hours. (Discounting the overtime premium that would be paid to the drivers.)
     
  10. KarenRei

    KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei KarenRei

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2017
    Messages:
    1,365
    Location:
    Iceland
    In the US. In the EU it's 45 minutes every 4 1/2 hours. I can't believe you let people haul 60 tonne loads for 11 hours without a break. And let them log their time on paper, at that. To me that sounds insane.

    Even in the US, long hauls are the exception, not the rule. The vast majority of long-haul cargo shipments are by rail, boat, or other means (at least by tonnage). 80% of total shipments by tonnage are under 500 miles, and semis dominate those. Source.

    It certainly could be. Or they could just be supercharging while at their destination. I guess we'll find out. Normally you don't want to have to have a lot of capital cost in something like a trailer that may spend significant time sitting around - but the economics will dictate what solution is best.
     
  11. oktane

    oktane Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2016
    Messages:
    1,496
    Location:
    USA
    I just don't see the Tesla semi taking off until they get some serious range.
     
    • Like x 1
  12. cpa

    cpa Active Member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2014
    Messages:
    1,514
    Location:
    Central Valley
    Karen, the GVW maximum on the interstate highways is 80,000 pounds, which equates to forty short tons (tonnes?) Not sure if a tonne is a spelling variant or another weight measurement. From what I understand new tractors have computer log books that record the hours the motor is running to supplement the manual log books maintained by drivers. I think the trucking lobby has a lot of sway in DC which may explain our 11-hour rule.

    You are correct that most terrestrial long hauls are by rail. But those typically are enormous quantities of a single product like cars, coal, lumber, grain, recycling, food grade oils, containers, etc. But many parts of the country are not served by rail and must rely upon long haul trucking to ship and receive goods.
     
  13. Barklikeadog

    Barklikeadog Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2016
    Messages:
    433
    Location:
    PA
    x2 on this
    The rail industry stopped hauling various small items 25years ago.
    Rail yards shrunk, Labor costs disappeared and a lot of workers were paid to go away, the caboose disappeared forever....

    and trucks on roadways multiplied almost immediately. :(
     
  14. Mjølner

    Mjølner Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2015
    Messages:
    105
    Location:
    Midgard (Norway)
    • Like x 1
  15. TaoJones

    TaoJones Beyond Driven

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2014
    Messages:
    1,683
    Location:
    The Americas
    Au contraire! Imagine, if you will, this/these:

    1. Phased replacement of every miserable exhaust-spewing short-hauler (intermodal) from the combined Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach - the largest port complex in the States.

    2. Expansion and replacement of existing fleets for Amazon’s shipping partners not named UPS, and Walmart.

    3. Ah, UPS.

    For #s 2 and 3, a smaller variant of the semi would be at least as helpful - picture the standard UPS brown truck.

    For long-haul OTR trucking, you’ve got a point today. Will be interesting to see how technology evolves in the next 5-7 years to support greater range. Maybe advances in charging will shorten that curve. Should be fun to witness.
     

Share This Page