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Tesla Wall Charger Gen 3 routing of wiring inside the box

SpriteM3

Member
Jul 1, 2021
63
101
Bay Area, CA
I'm a DIY type of guy but when it comes to the WC I decided to hire an electrician to be on the safe side. He shows up and he said he's installed WC before so I figured I didn't have to watch him since he's the expert, right? He wired everything up, I connected the WC to my wifi and everything seems to be working. He leaves and I decide to take the faceplate off to make sure he routed the cables as Tesla designed the unit... he didn't. See attached picture.

I'm kind of mad at myself because it was on the back of my mind and I should have mentioned it from the beginning but I gave him the benefit of the doubt since he said he's installed them before.

I know it probably doesn't matter it's wired the way it is by electrical standards but at the same time I'm paying a premium for this install (I got 4 other estimates, this one was one of the higher ones). I'm about 90% sure come Monday I'm going to request he come back out and rewire the charger as Tesla designed it, but I'm also questioning if I'm making a big fuss over a non issue. I know this sucks for him because he'll probably have to pull new wiring through the conduit since there isn't enough slack to route it as designed.

Thoughts?
 

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Sophias_dad

Supporting Member
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Jul 29, 2018
1,470
1,496
Massachusetts
Yep, sucks for him. Hopefully it's a short run of conduit. He's probably going to want to splice new wires onto the ones that are there. Resist that.

Out of curiosity, what gauge is that wire, what amperage circuit breaker is it connected to, and what is the HPWC set to?
 
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sundaydrive

Member
Mar 24, 2021
85
53
NJ, USA
Yeah, that’s unfortunate. Like you said, it’s perfectly functional this way. The way Tesla has us route prevents the wire from getting pulled straight out for any reason. It also leaves some wire slack for anytime you might need in the future.

Since the electrician was either oblivious or lazy be prepared for them to push back.

Either way, you might want to get an anti-short or insulating bushing to protect the wires.
 
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Ostrichsak

Active Member
Sep 6, 2018
3,603
3,638
Colorado, USA
Pretty sure he should not have used two red wires, it should have been one black and one red.

Red or black can both indicate a conductor. It's more important to not use red/black for neutral or ground or the other way around. Either way, electrical tape is an easy enough fix and is an acceptable way to indicate wire color within boxes.
 

SpriteM3

Member
Jul 1, 2021
63
101
Bay Area, CA
Yep, sucks for him. Hopefully it's a short run of conduit. He's probably going to want to splice new wires onto the ones that are there. Resist that.

Out of curiosity, what gauge is that wire, what amperage circuit breaker is it connected to, and what is the HPWC set to?
I'm not sure what gauge wire it is. The circuit is 60 amp and I set the WC to 50 amps. I have an older 100 amp sub panel and wanted my max pull to be 40 amp.
 

Ostrichsak

Active Member
Sep 6, 2018
3,603
3,638
Colorado, USA
I'm not sure what gauge wire it is. The circuit is 60 amp and I set the WC to 50 amps. I have an older 100 amp sub panel and wanted my max pull to be 40 amp.
If you want your maximum draw to be 40A why would you set the HPWC to 50A on a 60A circuit?

Also, the proper setting for that 60A circuit would be to only draw 48A maximum (80%) on a 60A circuit.

Also also, that looks like it may be #6 at best (hard to tell from the photo but that's probably what most sparky's are going to have on their truck) which may be a little light for a 60A circuit drawing at 50A continuous.

I think there may be more going on here that needs to be addressed other than the obvious from the photo.
 

Sophias_dad

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Jul 29, 2018
1,470
1,496
Massachusetts
If you want your maximum draw to be 40A why would you set the HPWC to 50A on a 60A circuit?

I gotta agree, the terminology from OP was a bit confusing. I interpreted it to be that the HPWC was set as if it has a 50 amp breaker which translates into a 40 amp maximum continuous draw. #6 is fine for 48 continuous(60 amp breaker) IF it is individual conductors in conduit. Notably it is NOT okay for a 60 amp breaker if its #8 in conduit.
 
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SpriteM3

Member
Jul 1, 2021
63
101
Bay Area, CA
If you want your maximum draw to be 40A why would you set the HPWC to 50A on a 60A circuit?

Also, the proper setting for that 60A circuit would be to only draw 48A maximum (80%) on a 60A circuit.

Also also, that looks like it may be #6 at best (hard to tell from the photo but that's probably what most sparky's are going to have on their truck) which may be a little light for a 60A circuit drawing at 50A continuous.

I think there may be more going on here that needs to be addressed other than the obvious from the photo.
When I did the setup for the wall charger I set it for a 50a breaker. The panel has a 60a breaker with the intention of upgrading my panel in the future.

I'll ask him what gauge wire he used when I speak to him.
 

ATPMSD

Member
Mar 12, 2021
276
270
Atlanta, GA
The circuit is 60 amp and I set the WC to 50 amps. I have an older 100 amp sub panel and wanted my max pull to be 40 amp.

There is nothing wrong in setting the WC as you have.

But, if the sub-panel has a 100-amp service line from the main breaker, and the breaker for the WC is 60-amps then you should set the WC to 60 amps and should not have any issues. However, if your house has only a 100-amp service line to the main breaker then setting the WC to 50-amps to limit the draw to 40-amps is fine. But you should then consider swapping ourthe 60-amp breaker to the WC for a 50.
 

SpriteM3

Member
Jul 1, 2021
63
101
Bay Area, CA
There is nothing wrong in setting the WC as you have.

But, if the sub-panel has a 100-amp service line from the main breaker, and the breaker for the WC is 60-amps then you should set the WC to 60 amps and should not have any issues. However, if your house has only a 100-amp service line to the main breaker then setting the WC to 50-amps to limit the draw to 40-amps is fine. But you should then consider swapping ourthe 60-amp breaker to the WC for a 50.
Correct me if I'm wrong, I was under the impression that pulling lower amperage on an installed breaker is fine, it's pulling more than it's rated is where problems will arise.
 

ATPMSD

Member
Mar 12, 2021
276
270
Atlanta, GA
Correct me if I'm wrong, I was under the impression that pulling lower amperage on an installed breaker is fine, it's pulling more than it's rated is where problems will arise.
I am not an electrician but I was always told the breaker should not be more than the maximum an appliance will draw. Example, if you connect a 40-amp appliance to a 50-amp circuit bad things can happen - to the appliance - if the appliance fails. On the other hand, it is common practice to connect a mobile connector (MC) to a 14-50 outlet, and the MC is actually rated at 40-amps, drawing a maximum of 32-amps. So that kind of blows that theory out the window. 😯

There is no harm in leaving the 60-amp breaker in place (assuming proper wiring of course.) My comment was really more over your concern to limit power drawn, a 50-amp breaker will offer greater protection but may well be overkill.

Hope that helps!
 
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tezlam3

Member
Jul 14, 2021
121
49
NYC
how much were your quotes if you dont mind me asking? im trying to get an electrician to install mine and they dont even answer...
 

Watts_Up

Active Member
Mar 4, 2019
3,643
2,458
In a galaxy far, far away
Pretty sure he should not have used two red wires, it should have been one black and one red.

What a sloppy job !!!!

I never seen a wire been connected without any slack.

The two wires are on separate phases and should use the corresponding color used on the main panel,
or use a black tape mark at each end to distinguished one from the other .
Also as mentioned above, an Insulating Plastic Conduit Bushing is missing.

This instalation doesn't seem to follow typical NEC code recommendations and might not pass the Permit Inspection,
a document that might be required for your homeowner Insurance.

Note: I will be curious to see the dedicated new circuit breaker with the two red wires, could you post a picture of it,
Also check if an Insulating Plastic Conduit Bushing might be missing at the other end of the conduit.
And also if there is any wire slack inside the main panel for each phase wire and ground.

Could you measure the length of the wire line, for AWG 6 wires under 240 V, length should less than 122 ft
and Max Ampacity is 55 Amp @ 60 Fahrenheit (from 2002 NEC).

PS: If you are a homeowner, you can claim a tax credit on your federal income tax return for your Wall Charger purchase and instalation.
See IRS publication 8911: About Form 8911, Alternative Fuel Vehicle Refueling Property Credit
 
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