Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

Tesla Wall Charger Gen 3 routing of wiring inside the box

SpriteM3

Member
Jul 1, 2021
63
101
Bay Area, CA
Could you measure the length of the wire line, for AWG 6 wires under 240 V, length should less than 122 ft
and Max Ampacity is 55 Amp @ 60 Fahrenheit (from 2002 NEC).

PS: If you are a homeowner, you can claim a tax credit on your federal income tax return for your Wall Charger purchase and instalation.
See IRS publication 8911: About Form 8911, Alternative Fuel Vehicle Refueling Property Credit

It's about a 15-20 ft run from my panel to the charger. Also if anyone is curious it's 6AWG wire.

I spoke to the electrician, I expressed my concerns that the wires weren't colored or taped to identify them in the panel to the wall charger as well as the wires not being routed as designed. He gave me minimal push back and will be fixing it. Hopefully this is the end of my story!
 

RTPEV

Active Member
Mar 21, 2016
1,013
1,150
Durham, NC
Thought I would add this picture from the manual that shows the correct routing since I was curious about what was "wrong" in the attached picture.
1627395171288.png
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,660
7,952
Boise, ID
I read through all of the comments, and I still don't get why everyone is flipping out about the wire position. So it doesn't have extra loopy distance, wrapping around things. So what? What's the problem? Just that it doesn't LOOK like the pictures in the wall connector manual recommend?
 

Sophias_dad

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Jul 29, 2018
1,471
1,496
Massachusetts
I read through all of the comments, and I still don't get why everyone is flipping out about the wire position. So it doesn't have extra loopy distance, wrapping around things. So what? What's the problem? Just that it doesn't LOOK like the pictures in the wall connector manual recommend?
I'm just saddened that a professional wouldn't leave even an inch of extra wire in the box, even though the manual suggests more like a foot and they specifically made a channel for a service loop. In the end, it really doesn't matter much if its only a 10-20 foot run. It still makes me question what other mistakes or shortcuts the professional made/took.
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,660
7,952
Boise, ID
I'm just saddened that a professional wouldn't leave even an inch of extra wire in the box, even though the manual suggests more like a foot and they specifically made a channel for a service loop. In the end, it really doesn't matter much if its only a 10-20 foot run. It still makes me question what other mistakes or shortcuts the professional made/took.
Why is everyone assuming there is no slack anywhere? Frequently, that extra slack is inside the wall, so the extra can be pulled out to be used later if a change is made, rather than put into the appliance that is being mounted.
 

Sophias_dad

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Jul 29, 2018
1,471
1,496
Massachusetts
Why is everyone assuming there is no slack anywhere? Frequently, that extra slack is inside the wall, so the extra can be pulled out to be used later if a change is made, rather than put into the appliance that is being mounted.
Neigh impossible to put slack inside a conduit(as the first pic shows this is) without violating minimum bend radius rules, and even if you could, it would be completely impossible to pull that slack out. I guess MAYBE there's a conduit body somewhere that you might be able to stow a few inches in safely, but I've never heard of that being allowed.
 

SpriteM3

Member
Jul 1, 2021
63
101
Bay Area, CA
I read through all of the comments, and I still don't get why everyone is flipping out about the wire position. So it doesn't have extra loopy distance, wrapping around things. So what? What's the problem? Just that it doesn't LOOK like the pictures in the wall connector manual recommend?
If it was my buddy who came over and did this for me, I would be probably be fine with it. Hell, even if I wasn't fine with it, how could I complain when I probably just paid him with pizza and beer?

My concern is paying a licensed electrician to install something and he didn't follow the directions. If I'm paying a professional (and one that had one of the higher estimates) I want it installed to code and exactly as designed by Tesla.

They say you get what you pay for and I just felt like I did not get what I paid for initially.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ATPMSD

Watts_Up

Active Member
Mar 4, 2019
3,643
2,458
In a galaxy far, far away
Why is everyone assuming there is no slack anywhere? Frequently, that extra slack is inside the wall, so the extra can be pulled out to be used later if a change is made, rather than put into the appliance that is being mounted.
From the NEC (National Electrical Code) you need to have about 6 inches slack in any connection box or receptacle box,
basically to ensure that there is enough slack to enable proper connections.
 
  • Informative
Reactions: ATPMSD

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,660
7,952
Boise, ID
From the NEC (National Electrical Code) you need to have about 6 inches slack in any connection box or receptacle box,
basically to ensure that there is enough slack to enable proper connections.
Oh, OK, that's something that no one had mentioned. I had never heard before that there is a code requirement for excess wire slack.
 

EVer Hopeful

Member
Jul 7, 2021
338
247
Texas
Pretty sure he should not have used two red wires, it should have been one black and one red.

It's a good point I think. While it's probably code, how would you trace the lines?


Regardless, this is what bothers me ... Just because you have a badge, doesn't mean you're going to do a good job. And this applies to doctors, airline pilots, teachers, plumbers, lawyers, and whatever you do for a living yourself. I'm in IT and I know who on my team I'd want working on something for me and who I'd want to never get to touch it. I suspect everyone has similar thoughts in their profession


Note, before the flaming starts, this is not meant as a slight against all electricians. I understand and agree with posts I've read here that mention the studying, the certification, the continuing education, the insurance and the liability. It's just that a badge doesn't necessarily guarantee things get done correctly
 
  • Like
Reactions: Rocky_H

ATPMSD

Member
Mar 12, 2021
276
270
Atlanta, GA
It's a good point I think. While it's probably code, how would you trace the lines?
If you want too, and you are comfortable working in the breaker box, here is what you can do:

1. Trip the breaker, then remove the cover of the TWC.
2. Go to the breaker box, open the breaker panel and - carefully - disconnect one of the wires from the breaker, then close the breaker. Only one of the two lines will have power.
3. Go to the TWC , only one of the two wires will be energized. Test for the energized line with a tester and let’s call the energized line the red one. Trip the breaker and then put a piece of black tape on the other line at the TWC, and reinstall the cover.
3. Go back to the breaker panel and - carefully - put a piece of black tape on the line you disconnected, then reattach it, close the breaker box and then close the breaker.

Or just don’t worry about it as you can always trace it later. 😉
 

Products we're discussing on TMC...

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top