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Tesla Wall Connector

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by MonkeyBC, Apr 25, 2016.

  1. MonkeyBC

    MonkeyBC Member

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    I eagerly await delivery and planning charging solutions. I live in a condo and therefore getting a 240 supply maybe difficult to arrange. I may have to accept 110. Can anyone confirm that the Tesla Wall Connector can be wired to and deliver the feed to the car at 110? It will make a far more professional looking installation, and it will also prevent some idiot from unplugging the car in the public garage.

    Thank you.

    r
     
  2. Mainpower

    Mainpower Member

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    Hey there. No - you can't connect the Tesla Wall Connector to a 110 line. Have you tried sitting down with the association to see if they will let you run a 240 line to your parking spot?
     
  3. MonkeyBC

    MonkeyBC Member

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    Manpower .... thank you so much for the answer. It is what I thought, but as I said earlier it makes for a much more professional looking and secure installation. The issue with my building is it was built just before the edict to provide power for EV's and as there are 250 parking spots, there is not enough power coming into the building to offer this service to everyone. Maybe not today ..... but as we all know the time is coming. Parking spots with 240 will be a premium and worth more cash! Thank you again.
     
  4. brkaus

    brkaus Member

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    Can you consider 240v at lower amps? A 240v 15a circuit will charge faster andcwork with an HPWC. No rule says it has to be 40a.
     
  5. davewill

    davewill Member

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    If you want to install a 120v EVSE here are some choices. You can get them sized for 16a, 20a and 25a circuits:

    [​IMG]
    ClipperCreek 120v EVSEs
     
  6. markb1

    markb1 Active Member

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    Your car will charge very slowly at 110V. On a 15A circuit, it will charge at 12A and 3 miles of range per hour. On a 20A circuit, you'll get 4 miles of charge per hour. (See Tesla Charging | Tesla Motors). 110V charging is also less efficient.

    Not sure how much you plan to drive, and how long to you plan to charge, but for many people, this just won't be enough. You really want to have a large cushion so you can run unplanned errands and enjoy your car's acceleration (which will drain your battery much faster). And unless you've driven a Model S for while, you don't know how much energy you're really going to consume.

    For most people, I think 140V/40A (50A circuit) is plenty, though. That's 29 miles of charge per hour, which can completely charge your battery overnight.
     
  7. Model S M.D.

    Model S M.D. Ludicrous Radiologist

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    @MonkeyBC You will definitely need more than 110V to charge your Tesla comfortably on a day to day basis. I have a 240V NEMA 14-50 that has worked fine over the past 5 months of use. I would get with @Mainpower and pick their brain on how to woo/convince the condo association to allow installation of a NEMA 14-50. It will make your life so much easier--it is such a blessing to wake up to a "full tank of gas" everyday. Good luck!!
     
  8. MonkeyBC

    MonkeyBC Member

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    You guys are great ... many thanks for your wisdom and advice. Hopefully this has helped others as well.
    Looking forward to getting my car in about 4 weeks!!!
    r
     
  9. Vince Cobelo

    Vince Cobelo Member

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    #9 Vince Cobelo, Apr 28, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2016
    This is probably going to sound stupid because it would be cost prohibitive. Thinking out of the box lets say you installed a Powerwall and had the inverter provide 220v 40 amp to the connector. Charge the PW all day long at 120/15a and dump the electrons when charging. When you move...take the Powerwall with you. I like puzzles.
     
  10. ABCCBA

    ABCCBA Member

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    @Vince Cobelo - Your idea is definitely a puzzle. While you could make that solution work, it would be inefficient and cost prohibitive. Why, without getting into electrical engineering calculations, lets just say that taking AC Power, running a DC Charger to charge the PowerWall, then running DC Power through a DC/AC Inverter will result in significant losses and inefficiencies. Then, you would need to look at the number of PowerWalls you would need to store enough energy to swiftly and fully charge the vehicle's battery. Without taking in the various losses and inefficiencies, if you just assume straight up 100%, the 120VAC/15A service provides 1.8KWh and the 240VAC/40A service provides 9.6KWh. So, for every hour that you supply the vehicle with 240VAC/40A, you would need to store 5.33 hours of 120VAC/15A power. So, as you can see, you would need several days of stored energy from a 120VAC/20A service to supply enough energy to fully charge a vehicle. Oh, and then you have the equipment and installation costs as well as the energy costs including the losses. But again, if money were no object it will definitely work.
     
  11. MP3Mike

    MP3Mike Active Member

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    Isn't a Powerwall module ~7kWh? So you would need 6-13 of them to be able to fully charge a Tesla. (From 0%.)

    If you only use 7kWh/day then it could work for you, but the other issue is that I don't think the Powerwall is designed for high current loads. Each module is rated for 3.3kW which would be ~13A. So again you are back to needing a number of them hooked together.
     
  12. Vince Cobelo

    Vince Cobelo Member

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    Toldja it was a stupid idea.
     
    • Funny x 1
  13. zambono

    zambono Member

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    Better look for a free or economical charging location near work. My office park provides free auto charging, 4hr turns
     
  14. David29

    David29 Member

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    Maybe some homework can help you find a solution that would allow you to get 240 volts. Do you know where the power panels are, either for your unit or for the garage? Do you know if the garage has 240 V supply? (Most likely it does, even if there are no 240 V circuits currently installed. All you need is some extra capacity and power supplied from both sides of the single phase 240 V circuit for the building.) And is there any possibility that you could swap your assigned space (if you have one) with someone else's that is near the power panel? If so, couldn't you propose to the HOA that you switch spaces and install a 240 V outlet (or a charging station) at or near the new space?
    That is the approach i took at my condo. I got agreement with another resident to swap parking spaces, and got agreement from the condo association board to install my charger at that location, on common property. And along the way, I had an electrician give me an estimate of the cost of various options. So I was confident that the solution we finally proposed was in fact doable.
    Key to this is the presumption that you would pay for the work and that there is no necessity to have all spaces wired this way. Even though we all want to see more EVs, we can realistically say that only a tiny percentage of vehicles now are EVs. So there is no need to accommodate any more than the current need, really. (My condo board was initially worried about setting a precedent but must have accepted that risk.)
    Also -- full disclosure -- even though my board has agreed, I am still discussing with them what the legal requirements will be for liability and insurance and so on, so it is not yet quite a done deal.
    Good luck!
     

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