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That was so close!

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by darthvdr, Dec 11, 2013.

  1. darthvdr

    darthvdr Member

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    Boy that was a close one as I thought I would have to get the car towed. The cold zapped more power than I expected with a loss of 30%. Anyone know how much juice is really left over? It went from "0" to "Charge Now" when I had 2 miles left to get home.
     

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  2. scaesare

    scaesare Active Member

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    It's been suggested that at a consumption rate of 308wh/mi there is a ~17mi buffer under zero. Obviously if you are consuming more than 308 because of cold temps, that would be less...

    I drove mine 1 mile under zero once... it was a tad unnerving, especially as I only had the car about a month...
     
  3. darthvdr

    darthvdr Member

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    Getting home, I going up a 2 mile grade that is 2000 ft above sea level, so it was extremely unnerving. Turned my screen off, bluetooth off, drl off, unplugged my phone charging cable, etc. Fortunately, I made it. The grade was rated at 700wh. Phew
     
  4. scaesare

    scaesare Active Member

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    High pucker-factor indeed!

    Glad you made it home... now don't do that again! ;)
     
  5. swegman

    swegman Member

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    I drove from Savannah GA to Florence SC on Sunday, a distance of 180 miles. I charged to 240 miles, figuring that is a 60 mile buffer, of which I would use up 30 miles driving the 70 mph speed limit. Unfortunately, it was 40 degrees, raining and windy, and I arrived at the hotel with only 4 miles range left (I drove the entire trip with the HVAC off and range mode on). The last 45 miles I drove at 55 mph because I was concerned I would not get to my destination. I called Tesla to ask them how much further I could drive when it says 0 miles left, and was told 1 mile, maybe 2 or 3 if I am lucky. According to them, 0 miles left really means zero, not like an ICE, where empty means there are 2 gallons left. BTW, I have a P85, and they told me the Michelin Pilot tires I have reduce my range by about 20 miles.
     
  6. jkliu47

    jkliu47 Member

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    Ahhh that explains the 'spike' in wh/mile usage at the end of your journey!

    I have a similar situation, the last 0.75 mile up the hill to my house always obliterates my low wh/ml averages.
     
  7. darthvdr

    darthvdr Member

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    Going up the grade, I was only moving at 30mph. Was such a relief when I got over the hump of the hill haha. I guess I can laugh about it now. With swegman's conversation with Tesla, I guess I was very lucky.
     
  8. gimp_dad

    gimp_dad Member

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    Interesting. Which Michelin Pilot tires do you have? There are a lot of them.
     
  9. 100thMonkey

    100thMonkey Member

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    I've found with both the Leaf and the Tesla S, if you need to squeak by on occasion, slowing way down and using hyper mile techniques make a big difference. going up hill, it's even more critical, you are compounding the usual wind drag with elevation gain. 55pmh or less can make a big difference in extending range, as going 65+ eats range. always good to keep in mind that wind drag, cold and wet/snowy roads dramatically reduce efficiency. if wind/rain/snow/cold and or elevation are a factor, prewarm the car right before leaving (which helps warm the battery-even time it to finish a longish charge right before you leave), start with a full battery and top up more frequently than usual till you really get the hang of the power consumption for a given route under various conditions.

    remember, as great as Tesla's BMS is, it's not clairvoyant... think ahead, err on the side of extra wiggle room and always best to have a plan B for an extra spot to stop and charge.
     
  10. swegman

    swegman Member

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    They are the tires that came with my car; 21 inch Michelin Pilot Sport tires. Good for performance but not for range.
     
  11. stevezzzz

    stevezzzz R;SigS;P85D;SigX

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    To the OP: glad you made it home up that nasty hill!

    My house is at the bottom of a 1.5 mile hill, so the spike I see occurs up front, as I leave: it's always nice to see the average consumption number drop continuously for awhile, and then again at the end of the day. I know, I'm fooling myself: but it's still nice.
     
  12. lloyds

    lloyds Member

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    whoa, don't do that too often OP. It's not good for your battery to be drained empty.
     
  13. metafor

    metafor Member

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    Out of curiousity, what made you choose the Michelin Pilots over the Continentals? I'm at about the mileage where I need to plan out my tire replacement (12k and gonna add another 1k this weekend) and I'm curious what my options are.
     
  14. Doug_G

    Doug_G Lead Moderator

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    Just FYI, turning all that stuff off probably got you a couple of dozen extra feet of range... the only things that actually matter is #1 driving speed and #2 heating/cooling. Turn off the heat and drive ~30 mph. That'll make you go a lot farther.
     
  15. Cottonwood

    Cottonwood Roadster#433, Model S#S37

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    Actually from recent evidence, zero miles appears to be 10% or so state of charge, and even with the car refusing to move, it still has a few percent "anti-brick" SOC left.
     
  16. DavidM

    DavidM P2624, Delivered

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    I can't relate. 11,000 miles and a full year with my Model S. I don't recall ever using the heater. Never climbed a steep grade. Never been below 40 miles of range. However, I am still using the AC.
    It's Florida.

    I'm reading and learning. Just in case I drive north in the winter.
     
  17. swegman

    swegman Member

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    My first model S had the pilot tires. My second model s came with the continentals. Under hard acceleration, the rear of the car would twitch. So Tesla replaced the continental tires with the Michelin tires, which eliminated that issue. The negatives are they are expensive (had to replace one after 3000 miles due to a sidewall bubble from a pothole, and reduced driving range.
     
  18. shepali

    shepali Member

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    I'm a newbie, and don't even have my car yet (6.5 days and counting!!). But tell me.....what happens when you totally run out of juice? I mean....if you don't pull over, will it just STOP? And then what....do you have to get a tow? Or is there a way to get a charge from someone? I'm hoping to never have to find this out....but the way I used to procrastinate getting gas, its possible!!!

    I've never run out of gas.....but my miles to empty was very accurate, and as people said, there was a buffer there to protect my bad judgement.
     
  19. Jason S

    Jason S Model S Sig Perf (P85)

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    I've seen 0 miles before and have gone an additional mile or two after. Others have reported 10-15 more miles before the car has to be towed and plugged in soon after. The lights and defrost continued to work after 0 was reached. At less than 20 miles, maybe 30 (I forget), there is a limiter on the amount of energy that can be used; takes the 0-60 down to about 8 seconds (it doesn't limit much).

    Run out of juice = car stops. Need to get a tow.

    Easiest thing is tow to nearest charger and then just charge there, then go home. Not quite like a gas car where the towtruck can just bring a gas can and put a gallon or two in.
     
  20. spaghetti

    spaghetti Member

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    Here in the East part of the San Francisco Bay Area, AAA is experimenting with a rescue truck outfitted with batteries and generators which can provide a limited emergency charge. I saw it an EV show in September. I wish I had taken a picture.
     

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