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The big 10K.

Discussion in 'Model S' started by mmh, Feb 12, 2015.

  1. mmh

    mmh Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2014
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    Location:
    SLC
    It's been an adventure!

    From June 29, 2014. to today.

    10k.jpg

    My Tesla and I have gone from SLC to: Aspen, Boise, Vegas, Moab, Wendover, and many mundane trips back and forth to and from work.

    Thank you Tesla for 10,000 Gas free, trouble free, exciting miles!
     
  2. kevincwelch

    kevincwelch Active Member

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    Chicagoland

    So much for two hands on the wheel! :wink: About to hit 10,000 myself.
     
  3. majorlance

    majorlance Member

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    Bethesda, MD
    Impressive usage stats too! Is that SLC on the map?
     
  4. eye.surgeon

    eye.surgeon Member

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    California
    Congratulations but you gotta drive it harder :) 319 wHr/mi is babying it.
     
  5. Xenoilphobe

    Xenoilphobe Active Member

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    I did 30K in one year - I drive it like it stole it. I didn't know it could go that low on the WPM meter. I thought 410 was low :)

    Only maintenance to date is two new tires.
     
  6. majorlance

    majorlance Member

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    Not that Virginia State Troopers don't have a a sense of humor or anything... ;) They just view us as a revenue source...
     
  7. Xenoilphobe

    Xenoilphobe Active Member

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    #7 Xenoilphobe, Feb 12, 2015
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2015
    Its really about the dollar - they should just charge a tax for exceeding the speed limit - you decide if you can afford it or not... 20MPH over costs your 3cents per mile, 40 MPH over cost 10cents per mile etc... i would be good with that.. 100 MPH over costs 25 cents a mile... etc..

    Most of the accidents are caused by slow drivers who are in the fast lane or gawkers who are watching the trooper with the pulled over HOV violator. I would give the slow driver double the fine of a speeder..
     
  8. mmh

    mmh Member

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    Location:
    SLC
    My usage stats were much better ~292wh/mi but then winter came. Yep, just my drive home from work. I have the nav up, because, 20 miles in a straight line, I might get lost...

    You two crack me up, I guess I should stop letting the Nissian Leafs pass me though. Next time I post a picture, I'll try and have my numbers higher =p
     
  9. Atebit

    Atebit Member

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    PA
    source?
     
  10. Xenoilphobe

    Xenoilphobe Active Member

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    Solomon CurveThe Solomon curve is a graphical representation of collision rate of automobiles as a function of their speed compared to the average vehicle speed on the same road. The curve based on research conducted by David Solomon in the late 1950s and published in 1964.[SUP][1][/SUP]

    Also over 30 years of driving experience in Asia, Africa, South America, Europe and North America, logging both on and off road miles. In the US I was a driver for UPS (briefly)and with other vehicles have logged 100,000 of miles on a motorcycles, cars, and military vehicles. If 100 cars have to pass on the right - a driver who is going exceeding slow in any lane - the chances for and accident increase significantly. The key is to maintain the speed of those around your vehicle. I usually use semi's as my "pace" vehicle - they cause the most damage and if they are in front of me in inclement weather - when they do slide they "sweep" the road clear. Those drivers also have a high "perch" and drive by looking 5 to 6 cars ahead (just like race cars) to anticipate for future events unfolding that they can react to. This is the same technic that some of the safest drivers on the road employ - which is why texting while driving is so dangerous - that should be a felony conviction and loss of driving privileges for a least a year.


    - - - Updated - - -

    Testimony of
    Julie Anna Cirillo
    Former Assistant Administrator and Chief Safety Officer
    for the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

    Senate Bill 94
    Before the Senate Highways and Transportation Committee
    June 10, 2003

    Chairman Armbruster and members of the Senate Highways and Transportation Committee, thank you for allowing me to testify before your committee. My name is Julie Anna Cirillo. The topic under consideration is one that I have focused on for almost my entire professional career. I recently retired from the United States Department of Transportation (DOT) where I was the Assistant Administrator and Chief Safety Officer for the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. I worked for the DOT for 34 years. The first 31 of these years were spent with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and its predecessor agencies where I was a safety researcher and ultimately the Regional Administrator in Region 9, San Francisco. I have an undergraduate degree in Mathematics and Physics and a Masters degree in Transportation Engineering. I have chaired and served on several committees for the National Academy of Sciences’ Transportation Research Board and the Institute of Transportation Engineers. I have received a number of awards and honors including the Secretary’s Gold and Silver Medal and the Presidential Meritorius Service Performance Award. During my tenure as a researcher I conducted a national study on the safety benefits of the Interstate System. As part of that research I reported that the Interstate System saves approximately 8,000 lives per year due to access control, wider lanes, shoulders, and safe operating speeds. In fact the Interstate Highway system experiences accident and fatality rates 2-5 times less than the primary system it replaced.In 1963 David Solomon first reported the effect of operating speeds on accidents. In his classic research, Solomon reported that deviation from the mean speed of traffic in BOTH the negative and positive direction contributed significantly to the occurrence of accidents. In fact Solomon showed that vehicles traveling 10-15 miles per hour slower than the mean speed of traffic were much more likely to be involved in accidents than vehicles traveling slightly above the mean speed. Solomon presented his results in the now famous “U-Shaped” curve, which relates variance from mean speed to involvement in accidents.Solomon’s study was conducted on 2 and 4 lane main rural highways. A similar analysis was conducted on the Interstate that has higher operating speeds. The data for this study was collected by 20 State Highway Departments, including Ohio. The analysis showed the same “U-Shaped” curve for Interstate highways and generally lower accident involvement rates, again confirming the safety benefits of the interstate system. The analysis also showed the variance in speeds on the Interstate was between 5-7 miles per hour approximately ½ that of non-interstate facilities.The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration subsequently contracted with Indiana University to conduct a speed-safety study. This study confirmed the “U-Shaped” curve established by Solomon and the Interstate Study.Over the years particularly during and following the energy crisis in 1972-73, the issue of speed limits, operating speeds, and safety has remained controversial and many studies conducted by a variety of organizations including the Transportation Research Board have tried to finally put the issue to rest. During all this activity and up to the present time there has been no evidence to alter Solomon’s original finding that variance from the mean operating speed is a major contributor to accidents. In fact, many safety organizations and states, including Ohio, advise drivers to “drive with the flow of traffic”.Jurisdictions responsible for insuring the safety of the traveling public should not take any action that could result in creating an unsafe situation. Included in these actions is the establishment and enforcement of differential speed limits for passenger cars and commercial vehicles. Adherence to differential speed limits creates a situation where a significant percentage of traffic is operating much slower than general traffic. This is always unsafe.In addition, differential speed limits may entice commercial traffic to use less safe non-interstate facilities. If this occurs the jurisdiction will experience much higher accident rates because of the inherent safety of the Interstate System.Before I conclude my presentation, I’d like to call your attention to several facts:
    1. Nationally, since 1999 the number of truck related fatalities and the truck fatality rate has decreased even though the total number of fatalities has increased and the fatality rate has essentially stayed the same. In addition, between 70 and 90 percent of accidents involving commercial vehicles and passenger cars, the passenger car is cited as the cause of the accident.2. You may hear claims that observed increases and/or decreases in accidents and/or fatalities are due to the existence of split or uniform speed limits. The attribution of any change in safety to any speed limit is very simplistic and generally without merit since the most important things affecting safety are traffic volume, access control, uniform design standards and uniform operating speeds. Claims or inferences that decreases in commercial vehicle accidents in any state is due to split speed limits also negates the impact of the very affective commercial vehicle safety programs in the states.3. You may also hear that in states where there are split speed limits commercial vehicles are cited for exceeding the posted speed limit (usually 55 mph) by 10-15 mph. Commercial vehicle drivers are professionals. They know that operating with the flow of traffic is the safest operating speed. If the average speed of all vehicles on freeways is about 70 mph then commercial vehicles are behaving in a responsible and safe manner, although in violation of the law. In a study by the Transportation Research Board of the National Academy of Sciences found that commercial vehicles were much more likely to violate the speed limit in states where the speed limit was 65 mph.4. Finally, it is essential to remember that most accidents occur on non-freeway facilities where split speed limits are not an issue.
    In summary, traffic operating at or about the same speed, regardless of speed limit, is the safest traffic environment. Jurisdictions should do whatever they can to encourage this operating scenario and should never require the opposite. Thank you for giving me the opportunity to testify and I would be pleased to answer any questions you may have.
     
  11. SeminoleFSU

    SeminoleFSU Member

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    Amen to that. That's pretty much the primary reason for any "Public safety" or State Patrol these days: REVENUE. They don't protect or serve anything but the state's bottom line
     

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