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The Future of EV Home Charging and the Grid

Discussion in 'Energy, Environment, and Policy' started by gnuarm, Jan 17, 2019.

  1. Rockster

    Rockster Active Member

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    Let’s not overlook the proliferation of solar among EV owners. I would have never considered rooftop solar before getting my Tesla. I’m sure as solar gets even more cost effective we’ll see more and more EV owners reducing their use of the grid.
     
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  2. Daniel in SD

    Daniel in SD Active Member

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    Very cool. It's a mystery to me where this idea that EV's will do anything but help the grid comes from. Maybe there's some part of the country where electric demand is flat all day long?
     
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  3. Daniel in SD

    Daniel in SD Active Member

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    Solar only reduces your use of the grid if you charge in the middle of the day which is fairly uncommon. In CA there is enough solar that it is bad for the grid. It produces a huge trough in demand in the middle of the day (the infamous duck curve!). Makes me wonder if in the future there will be a push to charge EVs in the middle of the day.
     
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  4. nwdiver

    nwdiver Well-Known Member

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    Trying to rationalize irrational ideas is rarely fruitful... or rational ;)

    I think we're already there; West facing solar panels would help too.
     
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  5. Big Dog

    Big Dog Member

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    My bad. Yes, heat pumps are excellent for a California coastal climate where temps rarely get below 40 degrees. however, I meant to say that HP's can be more costly for heating over natural gas which is really cheap out here. (Now, if one had solar panels, HP's get much more economical...)
     
  6. Big Dog

    Big Dog Member

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    I must be ahead of the curve since I charge during midday (and that is bcos our ToU plan stinks, at least for my mileage usage).
     
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  7. M3BlueGeorgia

    M3BlueGeorgia Member

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    No, you didn't pay attention to my rebuttal.

    In most, if not all of the USA, we have massive excess generation and distribution capability available at exactly the time people charge their cars.
     
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  8. Daniel in SD

    Daniel in SD Active Member

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    Yeah at San Diego’s ridiculous electric rates it’s probably not cost effective. However we have very favorable solar net metering rules and It was a good excuse to get AC. My bill is about $5 a month.
     
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  9. mspohr

    mspohr Well-Known Member

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    I live at 6500 ft in the Sierras with cold and snow. My heat pump works well to provide hot water and hydronic heating. Solar electricity is "free".
     
  10. Big Dog

    Big Dog Member

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    There's a huge difference between working well and being efficient. And HP's are not very efficient below ~30 degrees. If you only have few of those days, then no problem. OTOH, many days below 30 degrees can be rather costly for electricity to run resistance heating. Is your hydronic system electric or gas?
     
  11. brkaus

    brkaus Well-Known Member

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    I'm not too worried. My EV has added roughly 10-15% to my annual electric usage. I'm pretty sure the utilities can handle that. It's brought my usage back to where I was before I moved from Incandescent to LED lighting. I have a lot of can lights.

    Business usage is also lower at night. Part of the reason summer peak AC loads are worse than winter night heat loads.

    Also, I know my utility is looking into it, They are offering EV rates and rebates that include the ability to replace home EVSE with one of their choosing and control the load within certain parameters.
     
  12. mspohr

    mspohr Well-Known Member

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    The hydronic system is run from the heat pump which makes hot water (Chiltrix CX34) for DHW and the hydronics. It has a positive COP down to -4F. I haven't installed any backup resistance heating since I haven't needed it.
     
  13. ViperDoc

    ViperDoc Roadster 1305

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    Our local utility has a great promotion. They will give you a free level 2 charger and if you let them slow down or stop your charging during peak hours (usually 5-9 at night this fall/winter), they will give you unlimited charging for $30/month. You have the option to still charge during the peak demand, but they charge pretty penny for it then. But $30/month for all the charging on our Model 3 that can use is a sweet deal.
     
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  14. mspohr

    mspohr Well-Known Member

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    Is that Green Mountain Power? They are very progressive and building grid management with batteries.
     
  15. ViperDoc

    ViperDoc Roadster 1305

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    Yes
     
  16. David99

    David99 Active Member

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    We have plenty of grid capacity to charge many millions EVs.
    To the environment it doesn't matter when and where the electricity is produced by renewable sources. It always offsets dirty electricity.
    A car (=EVs) sits around parked the vast majority of the day. Mostly at night when everyone is sleeping and during the day when people have their cars parked at their work place. There is plenty of opportunity to charge them when the grid has excess.
    The average car drives 12k miles a year which roughly equates to 11 kWh a day. Seems like a very reasonable amount of energy.

    It takes aprox 6kWh of electricity to refine one gallon of gasoline. The distance an EV can drive with 6 kWh of energy is aprox the same as a gasoline car can drive with one gallon of gasoline. That means if we replace all ICE vehicles with EVs, the amount of electricity needed for the EVs is almost exactly offset by the amount of electricity we safe not refining gasoline any more.
     
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  17. Uncle Paul

    Uncle Paul Active Member

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    Interesting conversation.

    I believe the ultimate solution will be a combination of large renewable utilities, combined with batteries to store that output so it can be available at peak times. Businesses shut down in the evenings, so lots of power available for homes.

    A home with a solar array and battery storage, combined with off peak auto charging will be pretty efficient.
     
  18. brkaus

    brkaus Well-Known Member

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    Even better deal if you get more EVs!!. I have $30 as well (50a breaker, could do larger for $50). Added a second Tesla :)
     
  19. David99

    David99 Active Member

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    EV2grid will come. EVs have massive batteries and sit around most of the time. They can act as a grid buffer. At high demand they put a little back into the grid, at low demand they charge. I also think there will be a big market for used EV batteries being repurposed as home power storage. It actually already is a market!
     
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  20. Big Dog

    Big Dog Member

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    ^^Also potential for PowerWalls. Charge up at night and use the juice to help run the ac during the heat of the day and peak grid demand.
     

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