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Thinking about model 3 coming from a 392 hemi

Been going back an forth doing research about the model 3 performance much as I can. Just wondering what are some of the real world mileage people get with this vehicle? People are all worried about not getting over 350 miles it seems people who hasn't own an ev. with my 392 hemi I normally get 280 miles of range the lowest 317 tops. So i'm pretty use to the mid to high 200 mile rage I get with gas.

What or some of the cold weather ranges? I don't have very bad winters for the most part. Missouri weather.
 

pnwadventures

@bpr1de on Instagram
Mar 3, 2021
318
437
Pacific Northwest
Do you have your own outdoor or garage electricity access where you park (e.g. not apartment or similar)? If so, range is irrelevant as the car will always start out “full” since you change it at home. If you regularly drive more than 280 miles nonstop and can’t afford the 10 minutes to recharge, then it might be an inconvenience. Otherwise, you’ll go months or years without ever actually stopping anywhere to charge, and you can use the gas money savings on new tires or whatever.

Expect between a 20% and 40% range reduction in winter, depending on where you are in Missouri and how fast you drive.

BTW… it’s staggeringly fast and fun to drive (even the LR AWD with boost).😎
 
Pnwadventures pretty much nailed it. I’ve only had my M3 Performance for a little less than two weeks now, never rode in one or drove one before, only sat in one at a Tesla store for a couple minutes to get a feel for the driving position and center screen.

Seemed ok so after thinking about it for a few more weeks I finally placed my order back on Jan 15. Delivery day got here and I drove it off the lot. Easy at first to get a feel for it plus there was traffic, but after a few miles it cleared out and I put the hammer down. I was not prepared for the instant brutal acceleration that followed haha, IT WAS AWESOME!!!

I gave a ride to a buddy at work who has a 2020 Durango SRT 392 and I think he might really be thinking about converting! For me the range is a non-issue, with my 50 miles daily commute I don’t need to charge every day but yeah it’s like a full tank every day if you do, and it takes five seconds to plug in.
 
Been going back an forth doing research about the model 3 performance much as I can. Just wondering what are some of the real world mileage people get with this vehicle? People are all worried about not getting over 350 miles it seems people who hasn't own an ev. with my 392 hemi I normally get 280 miles of range the lowest 317 tops. So i'm pretty use to the mid to high 200 mile rage I get with gas.

What or some of the cold weather ranges? I don't have very bad winters for the most part. Missouri weather.
I came from 20 years of driving only 3, 4, 5 and M series BMW's. I researched Tesla's for about two years before making the move...I will never go back. This car is so much 'effing fun but is also great a a DD. There are a few things I do miss, the seats are comfortable but the BMW seats were better, especially in corners. I also miss having a HUD, not a deal breaker but still miss those two things. I live just north of Philadelphia and I would think our winter is somewhat comparable to yours, yes there is range loss in the cold but as stated above unless you have a very long commute and or cannot charge at home it's a non issue. I don't need to hear exhaust noise or rev my engine so this transition was easy.
 

holmgang

Active Member
Sep 9, 2019
1,443
1,588
eu
you need to calibrate how you think about the range, or think about how people talk about it.

the theoretical max range quoted assumes running battery from 100% battery to 0%.
the practical on-road range is more like 90%-10%, or 80-20%, because this is dictated by charging speed and locations.

starting 100% only really apply if you start from overnight location, and ending at 0% only works if you can precisely time it to home or the next charger.
 
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Keep in mind gas has been around for decades and transitioning to a new tech and habit is not what human like unlike most of us here on the forums :). You will learn soon enough. You won't think of gas vehicles anymore and laugh at those 6$/gallon (2$/litres in Canada).

Lucid with there 500 miles is cool but for the middle class, the pricing is out of range and most don't drive more than the car can give you in range (Travel 50 miles a day or 100km).
 
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As long as you can charge at home your effective range will be greater than it is with your gas car. My last pure ICEV had a 5.7L Hemi, on road trips we did just as many stops as we do with my AWD Model 3. With a gas car you have to go to the gas station once a week, with an EV you never have to go to a Supercharger except on road trips.

Before you buy a Tesla take a look at the Supercharger map to make sure that all of the places that you travel to have coverage, chances are that you'll find that your area is well covered. The one change in behavior for roads trips is that you should plan where you are going to charge, you need to stop to go to the bathroom anyway, with a Tesla you do that while charging. BTW it will take you less time for a charge stop than a gas stop. With gas you have to pump the fuel first, then move your car, and then go to the bathroom. At a Supercharger you just plug in and then go to the bathroom while charging, by the time you've gone to the bathroom and maybe bought a donut the car will be charged.
 
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As long as you can charge at home your effective range will be greater than it is with your gas car. My last pure ICEV had a 5.7L Hemi, on road trips we did just as many stops as we do with my AWD Model 3. With a gas car you have to go to the gas station once a week, with an EV you never have to go to a Supercharger except on road trips.

Before you buy a Tesla take a look at the Supercharger map to make sure that all of the places that you travel to have coverage, chances are that you'll find that your area is well covered. The one change in behavior for roads trips is that you should plan where you are going to charge, you need to stop to go to the bathroom anyway, with a Tesla you do that while charging. BTW it will take you less time for a charge stop than a gas stop. With gas you have to pump the fuel first, then move your car, and then go to the bathroom. At a Supercharger you just plug in and then go to the bathroom while charging, by the time you've gone to the bathroom and maybe bought a donut the car will be charged.
I would like to thank you for the courtesy of moving your vehicle after you've fueled it. Too many times in the past I witnessed after fueling the person would then go into the gas station to buy stuff/use the restroom, whatever but leave their vehicle tieing up the pump.
 
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You may have to adapt to the level of acceleration, start with "chill mode"

MO cold is not cold, MN, ND cold is cold (didn't know Alaska and Montana abbreviations) those places have issues but you'll make it.

It takes a while to realize that the acceleration doesn't come at the expense of watching the had gauge, and your wallet, go to empty.
 
Piling on the attitude that total range is kind of irrelevant.....but only if you have a place at home to charge your EV, or there is a recharging station convenient to where you go. I came from a BMW 550 MSport, first to a Focus EV with only 75 miles of range, and now to a non-P Model 3. I can recharge in my garage. I will never go back to a ICE vehicle. The only time I go to a gas station is when my wife's car is low on gas, and she "volunteers" me to go fill it up for her.

About a year ago, I had to move out of my house while I remodeled it. The house I was staying in did not have off-street parking, and I had no way to charge the Tesla. The closest Superchargers were not all that convenient to me, plus there was typically a line when I would stop to charge (this was in Orange County, CA, where the ratio of Tesla's to people has to be about the highest anywhere). We have chargers at work, but they are Level 2 chargers (30-35 miles of charge per hour), and they are limited to two hours of charging, due to the large number of people wanting to use them; plus, they were VERY expensive. After 3 months of this, I came to the conclusion that, without a convenient place to charge at home or at work, an EV is more trouble than it's worth.

As far as driving experience, the only part I miss from my BMW is the sound (that V8 sound is intoxicating), and shifting (my BMW was a manual transmission).

Keith
 
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holmgang

Active Member
Sep 9, 2019
1,443
1,588
eu
Before you buy a Tesla take a look at the Supercharger map to make sure that all of the places that you travel to have coverage, chances are that you'll find that your area is well covered. The one change in behavior for roads trips is that you should plan where you are going to charge, you need to stop to go to the bathroom anyway, with a Tesla you do that while charging. BTW it will take you less time for a charge stop than a gas stop. With gas you have to pump the fuel first, then move your car, and then go to the bathroom. At a Supercharger you just plug in and then go to the bathroom while charging, by the time you've gone to the bathroom and maybe bought a donut the car will be charged.
How long do you spend going to the bathroom at a gas station exactly?
 
You may have to adapt to the level of acceleration, start with "chill mode"

MO cold is not cold, MN, ND cold is cold (didn't know Alaska and Montana abbreviations) those places have issues but you'll make it.

It takes a while to realize that the acceleration doesn't come at the expense of watching the had gauge, and your wallet, go to empty.

Yeah, the last performance car I had before my M3LR was a 2015 Challenger SRT. My LR was quicker than the Challenger before I got acceleration boost not to mention after, so be prepared for it to be quicker. Like, a lot quicker than what you are used to. I never could bring myself to do chill mode so I puckered a lot for the first 500 miles or so. It takes some getting used to. For me at least, it felt like it was so powerful it was hard to control. Then you realize it's not the power, it's the instant delivery. Once your foot gets used to the fact that you don't have to lay into the accelerator to get it going, you can thread a needle with it and it is even more controllable than ICE cars.

Mike
 
Thanks guys for all your input. Just wanted to get some real world thoughts out there. I am still a year in a half away of getting one and want to do much research as i can before pulling the trigger. Just like ive done on the 392. So far i like all the tech stuff that comes with it. And power. Maybe 0-60 in high 2s. Wish it had more power though not that its the deciding factor. Its faster then my SRT that's for sure. But the 392 has more top end. .

Looked at different brands as well. Really narrowed it down to 2. M3P and or see what dodge is cooking up.
 
Also another question. on the m3p are the front and back tires a different size? Like staggered? I've seen some with that set up and some without? If so how wide or the tires on the back and can you get all tires the same size as the back all way around or will they not fit on the front because of how wide they are?
 

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