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Thoughts on the Hyundai Ioniq DC charging speed?

Discussion in 'Charging Standards and Infrastructure' started by Candleflame, Jun 10, 2017.

  1. Candleflame

    Candleflame Member

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    Just wondering what some people here are thinking about the Hyundai Ioniq DC charging speed.

    The Hyundai Ioniq EV variant has a 28kwh battery and apparently supports DC fast charging up to 100kw. Now, obviously there is only a few 100kw chargers but Bjoern has actually tested the Ioniq charging speeds at a 100kw CSS charger.



    It seems that the Ioniq charges from 10-50% at 65kw and 50-80% at close to 70kw with throttling thereafter. Hyundai has since then advertised a 30min 0 - 80% charge on a 50kw charger and a 23min 0 to 80% charge on a 100kw charger.

    In the video bjorn achieves a 10% to 94% charge time of 30min and 10% to 80% charge time of 18min.

    I think the Ioniq also supports regenerative breaking of up to 60kw.

    Now, the charging speeds in Bjoerns video would be comparable to 232kw supercharging on the Model S 100 from 10 to 80% yet Tesla is obviously driving their batteries nowhere near as hard.
    Range degradation reports seem to be quite favourable for the Ioniq at the moment although they have not been out for long and arguably there are not that many people who DC charge frequently on the car. Hyundai also offers a lifetime battery warranty in some countries.

    Atm the Ioniq has a range of about 170 km at 130-140kmh (85mph) so with the 50kwh battery which they have announced for 2018 a 300km range should be possible. With a 0 to 80% charging time of 23min!

    Europe is already plastered with 50 kw CCS chargers (CCS/Combo Charge Map - Europe) and I think it is only a matter of time until they'll have more 100kw chargers.

    Any thoughts on these fast charging speeds and what it means for battery longevity?
     
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  2. Cloxxki

    Cloxxki Member

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    Excellent thread, I've been pondering this very thing for a while and am curious how this is going to develop. Hyundai may seem to have a chemistry and packaging that truly suits the charge time anxiety crew.
    Putting these cells into a slightly larger car with 84kWh (91.5kWh total), say a Model S competitior which they certainly could patch together nicely, triple the charging speed would make it 208kW. And 200kW now a very good portion of the charge cycle.
    If we take into account the low price of the Ioniq EV, and presume as much as double the price for a larger car with triple the battery, and it's still a very affordable car. In the Netherlands a hypothetical €65K for the size and range of an S100D if not better.
     
  3. Candleflame

    Candleflame Member

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    they also seem to have pretty good selfdriving function on board (yes, it is not as good as Teslas, but it seems to do the job really really well. Which cannot be said about most other manufacturers including BMW/Mercedes/Audi).

    Looks like they are going all-in for some reason which is strange for a budget brand. It seems almost like they have skipped tomorrows technology and went straight to the tech which should only be released to the market in 2-3 years.


    I don't think 200kw is realistic anytime soon as even the newly installed CSS chargers only do 100kw. Chademo does 75kw if I remember this correctly. But a 100kw charge from 10 - 80% on a 60kwh battery still means a charge time of only 25min. Assuming that hyundai is limiting the charge to 70kw on the current Ioniqs despite advertising 100kw.


    Also I do not think that they managed to discover some well working battery chemistry as they get their batteries from LG anyways. If their chemistry would really be superior Tesla would have already reverse engineered it (doesn't Tesla still use LG packs too?)
     
  4. Cloxxki

    Cloxxki Member

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    I'm crazy of course, but if the chargers lag the cars, I'm all for a second plug on the car. If an extra stall is available, top me off twice as quick!
     

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