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Tips on drag racing your Model S Plaid...on the track.

For those who have not yet experienced what it’s like to be on a drag strip with your MS Plaid, this post is for you.

Most big US drag strips operate under rules of the National Hot Rod Association, which is fine unless you drive a really quick, unmodified (stock) electric car. The Plaid can scoot through the quarter mile in around 9.2 or 9.3 seconds. NHRA rules stipulate that a car that can do the quarter in under 10 seconds must have a roll cage, a parachute, the driver must wear a fire resistant suit, and also possess a special racing license. I think there are more restrictions, too.

A few years ago when Dodge released its one-year-only Demon with 840 horsepower, they claimed it was so quick it was “illegal” at NHRA tracks. Dodge marketed the car using a letter from the NHRA that said the car -- in stock form -- could not run on their tracks. Cool sales ploy, and the Demon did the quarter mile in the high 9-second range. Interestingly, I’ve heard nobody else has matched that time in that car in stock form, whatever that may mean. To run at an NHRA track in the 9s, the rules about the roll cage, parachute, etc., apply.

Some NHRA track managers have told Plaid drivers to hit the brakes at the 1,000-foot marker so as to not dip into the 9s, but what fun is that? If your unmodded Plaid does the quarter in under 10 seconds, you’ll be warned. Second violation, you're told to leave.

Now, I’ve been racing at Willow Springs International Raceway in Rosamond, CA, which is in the desert about an hour and a half north-northeast of Los Angeles. It’s not an NHRA track. And it’s about 1,040 feet long (quarter mile is 1,320 feet). It’s a run-what-you-brung place, which is great if you don’t want to deal with pro drag racing's bureaucracy. Thirty-five bucks gets you in the pits and to the starting line.

Willow Springs opened in 1953. It’s a road racing place. Drag racing occurs on the straight near the stands, usually at night. I’m of the opinion they ought to buy an adjoining parcel of desert land and make the strip a quarter mile with a big shutdown area, but whatever. You will need a racing helmet that meets certain specifications; check the race track’s website for their requirements. Then do a Google search for a helmet that meets those requirements. They are easy to find. Some tracks offer rental helmets.

There are things to sign which make you assume all the liability if bad stuff happens. After registration, you’re good to go. Your auto insurance will almost certainly not cover you at a race track (check your policy), but you can buy track day insurance online. Put the car in Drag Strip Mode to bring the battery to optimum temperature. When you get the red-orange indicator on the instrument panel, the car is ready. Put your suspension at the lowest level. It’s time to race. Drive to the entrance of the staging lane. An official may draw a number on your glass.

Cars will move forward as race officials direct them, in pairs, to move to the starting area. In the burnout box, ICE cars will often smoke their tires to clean off any debris and to warm up the rubber for improved traction. It’s an impressive display but it really is pointless for most when they’re up against a Tesla Plaid. All-wheel drive and traction control means you can’t smoke the tires, so don’t even try. Just gag on the smoke as you drive through it and roll unimpressively to the staging area and stop where the official tells you to.

After the cars ahead of you take off then clear the track, you will be signaled to move to the starting line. That thing between the lanes with the colored lights on it is called the Christmas tree. One set of lights is aimed at you, the other set at your opponent. There will be two staging lights at the top. Move forward slowly until the first light turns on. Then stop when the second light turns on.

Immediately put the car into cheetah stance; don’t wait. It takes several seconds to get ready. Left foot down on the brake very hard and hold. Right foot all the way down on the go-pedal and hold. When the official sees both cars are correctly in position, he will start the countdown. There will be four more lights turning on about a half second apart. The first three are amber so you get the rhythm. The fourth light is green. Anticipate when to release the brake. If you release too early you will see a red light, which means you screwed up and lost.

And here’s the fun part. It almost doesn’t matter what kind of car is in the other lane. No doubt you'll hear the roar of an engine before the green light. Chances are good it’ll be a Charger, Challenger, Camaro, Corvette, or a Mustang. ICE cars are at a big disadvantage compared to electric cars. Engines have a narrow torque band, which is why they have transmissions. The point of a transmission is to keep the engine in its torque band as the car accelerates. Your Plaid has no such issues. You have 100% torque from the instant you release the brake, and no time is lost to shifting gears.

And it's a massive amount of torque (1,050 lb.-ft.). Instant torque means you leap out front with no delay. For your opponent, the challenge is to catch you within several seconds, and good luck with that. Another advantage of that quick leap off the line is you may well be out of the way if the other guy blows up (shrapnel, oil), or crashes.

When the light turns green and you take your left foot off, you're slammed hard into the seat and whoever is in the other lane instantly disappears behind you. Poof, gone! The roaring engine sound fades. You'd think you’re all alone on the track, serenely accelerating, just racing against the clock, were it not for the receding headlights in the rear view. The steering gets light so stay alert. Focus, ignore that other car. That finish line is coming at you quickly. At Willow Springs, it’s marked by white cones. There is a device at the cones which will record your finish.

When you pass the finish line, you enter the shutdown area. Decelerate and be aware of the other car. Enter the return road. When you get back to the pit area, an official will hand you your time slip. It contains info for both cars, including driver reaction time, speed at the finish and the ET, or elapsed time. The lower the time, the better.

At Willow Springs, the shutdown area is very short. The instant I pass the finish line, I’m hard on the brakes. When racing at Willow at night, I’m usually off the accelerator or on the brakes before the finish. Darkness means I want a little more time to slow down. This shutdown area was probably not designed to accommodate very fast 4,800-lb. cars. At Willow, I can cover the more-or-less 1,040 feet in 7.9 seconds at 135 mph. That's a lot of energy to scrub off.

I recommend you research the track layout before racing, especially at Willow Springs since you’ll need to slow down so quickly.

Drag racers love quick cars. You’ll get some thumbs-up and probably some scowls. The word is out. The Model S Plaid is a ruthless predator. A lot of guys won’t want to race you. If they have a stock car, it’s a guaranteed loss. And there is a lot of video on YouTube of Plaids spanking heavily-modded cars, too. And while getting through a quarter mile in the 9s is really hard to engineer, some *dedicated* drag cars (dragsters, etc.) will spank you! You won’t win ‘em all, but in most cases you will lose only if you mess up.

The Model S Plaid isn’t really a race car. It’s just a nice, quiet family sedan.
🙂
Which happens to have long, thick, curved claws and razor-sharp teeth.
 

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This is awesome. I searched for this info literally yesterday and nobody has shared such useful information! I am going to drag mine at the Orlando Speedworld on their test and tune day. I have had my car for two months now and have yet to floor it from a stand still.

Approximately how many feet of asphalt should I anticipate eating up from the moment I start braking to stop? Their strip is a half mile long and I want to leave more than enough room since I‘ve never done this before. I don’t care about my 1/4 mile or who beats me. I just want to hold the pedal down to about 130 mph and let off just to see what it feels like.

I had a 2022 Model 3P that I used to floor all the time and it was fun as hell. The S just eats up so much pavement so fast, while busting through triple digits on the speedo without even knowing it that I want to leave it for a dragstrip, and not I4. I was merging onto the interstate in my S and needed to get in front of the guy in the left lane because heaven forbid I slow down and ease in behind him. Well I got in front of him and looked down to see I was doing 113 mph. I couldn’t even tell. 60-130 in maybe a couple seconds. This car is scary.
 
This is awesome. I searched for this info literally yesterday and nobody has shared such useful information! I am going to drag mine at the Orlando Speedworld on their test and tune day. I have had my car for two months now and have yet to floor it from a stand still.

Approximately how many feet of asphalt should I anticipate eating up from the moment I start braking to stop? Their strip is a half mile long and I want to leave more than enough room since I‘ve never done this before. I don’t care about my 1/4 mile or who beats me. I just want to hold the pedal down to about 130 mph and let off just to see what it feels like.

I had a 2022 Model 3P that I used to floor all the time and it was fun as hell. The S just eats up so much pavement so fast, while busting through triple digits on the speedo without even knowing it that I want to leave it for a dragstrip, and not I4. I was merging onto the interstate in my S and needed to get in front of the guy in the left lane because heaven forbid I slow down and ease in behind him. Well I got in front of him and looked down to see I was doing 113 mph. I couldn’t even tell. 60-130 in maybe a couple seconds. This car is scary.
You're right, it's scary. Check out this video from Orlando Speed World. You've got a lot of room to slow down, no worries. Have fun out there.

 

FlatSix911

Porsche 918 Hybrid
Jun 15, 2015
7,472
7,689
Silicon Valley
For those who have not yet experienced what it’s like to be on a drag strip with your MS Plaid, this post is for you.

Most big US drag strips operate under rules of the National Hot Rod Association, which is fine unless you drive a really quick, unmodified (stock) electric car. The Plaid can scoot through the quarter mile in around 9.2 or 9.3 seconds. NHRA rules stipulate that a car that can do the quarter in under 10 seconds must have a roll cage, a parachute, the driver must wear a fire resistant suit, and also possess a special racing license. I think there are more restrictions, too.

A few years ago when Dodge released its one-year-only Demon with 840 horsepower, they claimed it was so quick it was “illegal” at NHRA tracks. Dodge marketed the car using a letter from the NHRA that said the car -- in stock form -- could not run on their tracks. Cool sales ploy, and the Demon did the quarter mile in the high 9-second range. Interestingly, I’ve heard nobody else has matched that time in that car in stock form, whatever that may mean. To run at an NHRA track in the 9s, the rules about the roll cage, parachute, etc., apply.

Some NHRA track managers have told Plaid drivers to hit the brakes at the 1,000-foot marker so as to not dip into the 9s, but what fun is that? If your unmodded Plaid does the quarter in under 10 seconds, you’ll be warned. Second violation, you're told to leave.

Now, I’ve been racing at Willow Springs International Raceway in Rosamond, CA, which is in the desert about an hour and a half north-northeast of Los Angeles. It’s not an NHRA track. And it’s about 1,040 feet long (quarter mile is 1,320 feet). It’s a run-what-you-brung place, which is great if you don’t want to deal with pro drag racing's bureaucracy. Thirty-five bucks gets you in the pits and to the starting line.

Willow Springs opened in 1953. It’s a road racing place. Drag racing occurs on the straight near the stands, usually at night. I’m of the opinion they ought to buy an adjoining parcel of desert land and make the strip a quarter mile with a big shutdown area, but whatever. You will need a racing helmet that meets certain specifications; check the race track’s website for their requirements. Then do a Google search for a helmet that meets those requirements. They are easy to find. Some tracks offer rental helmets.

There are things to sign which make you assume all the liability if bad stuff happens. After registration, you’re good to go. Your auto insurance will almost certainly not cover you at a race track (check your policy), but you can buy track day insurance online. Put the car in Drag Strip Mode to bring the battery to optimum temperature. When you get the red-orange indicator on the instrument panel, the car is ready. Put your suspension at the lowest level. It’s time to race. Drive to the entrance of the staging lane. An official may draw a number on your glass.

Cars will move forward as race officials direct them, in pairs, to move to the starting area. In the burnout box, ICE cars will often smoke their tires to clean off any debris and to warm up the rubber for improved traction. It’s an impressive display but it really is pointless for most when they’re up against a Tesla Plaid. All-wheel drive and traction control means you can’t smoke the tires, so don’t even try. Just gag on the smoke as you drive through it and roll unimpressively to the staging area and stop where the official tells you to.

After the cars ahead of you take off then clear the track, you will be signaled to move to the starting line. That thing between the lanes with the colored lights on it is called the Christmas tree. One set of lights is aimed at you, the other set at your opponent. There will be two staging lights at the top. Move forward slowly until the first light turns on. Then stop when the second light turns on.

Immediately put the car into cheetah stance; don’t wait. It takes several seconds to get ready. Left foot down on the brake very hard and hold. Right foot all the way down on the go-pedal and hold. When the official sees both cars are correctly in position, he will start the countdown. There will be four more lights turning on about a half second apart. The first three are amber so you get the rhythm. The fourth light is green. Anticipate when to release the brake. If you release too early you will see a red light, which means you screwed up and lost.

And here’s the fun part. It almost doesn’t matter what kind of car is in the other lane. No doubt you'll hear the roar of an engine before the green light. Chances are good it’ll be a Charger, Challenger, Camaro, Corvette, or a Mustang. ICE cars are at a big disadvantage compared to electric cars. Engines have a narrow torque band, which is why they have transmissions. The point of a transmission is to keep the engine in its torque band as the car accelerates. Your Plaid has no such issues. You have 100% torque from the instant you release the brake, and no time is lost to shifting gears.

And it's a massive amount of torque (1,050 lb.-ft.). Instant torque means you leap out front with no delay. For your opponent, the challenge is to catch you within several seconds, and good luck with that. Another advantage of that quick leap off the line is you may well be out of the way if the other guy blows up (shrapnel, oil), or crashes.

When the light turns green and you take your left foot off, you're slammed hard into the seat and whoever is in the other lane instantly disappears behind you. Poof, gone! The roaring engine sound fades. You'd think you’re all alone on the track, serenely accelerating, just racing against the clock, were it not for the receding headlights in the rear view. The steering gets light so stay alert. Focus, ignore that other car. That finish line is coming at you quickly. At Willow Springs, it’s marked by white cones. There is a device at the cones which will record your finish.

When you pass the finish line, you enter the shutdown area. Decelerate and be aware of the other car. Enter the return road. When you get back to the pit area, an official will hand you your time slip. It contains info for both cars, including driver reaction time, speed at the finish and the ET, or elapsed time. The lower the time, the better.

At Willow Springs, the shutdown area is very short. The instant I pass the finish line, I’m hard on the brakes. When racing at Willow at night, I’m usually off the accelerator or on the brakes before the finish. Darkness means I want a little more time to slow down. This shutdown area was probably not designed to accommodate very fast 4,800-lb. cars. At Willow, I can cover the more-or-less 1,040 feet in 7.9 seconds at 135 mph. That's a lot of energy to scrub off.

I recommend you research the track layout before racing, especially at Willow Springs since you’ll need to slow down so quickly.

Drag racers love quick cars. You’ll get some thumbs-up and probably some scowls. The word is out. The Model S Plaid is a ruthless predator. A lot of guys won’t want to race you. If they have a stock car, it’s a guaranteed loss. And there is a lot of video on YouTube of Plaids spanking heavily-modded cars, too. And while getting through a quarter mile in the 9s is really hard to engineer, some *dedicated* drag cars (dragsters, etc.) will spank you! You won’t win ‘em all, but in most cases you will lose only if you mess up.

The Model S Plaid isn’t really a race car. It’s just a nice, quiet family sedan.
🙂
Which happens to have long, thick, curved claws and razor-sharp teeth.
Well done... thanks for posting.
 
  • Like
Reactions: MichaelP90DL
EDIT: I was misinformed, posted rules are as follows:

2008 OEM model-year and newer production cars running slower than 9.99 (*6.39) and 135 mph do not have to meet the requirements and specifications for the Summit Racing Series except for the following: Convertibles and T-tops must meet Summit Racing Series roll-bar and roll-cage requirements.
 
Last edited:
  • Informative
Reactions: MichaelP90DL
Thanks for the tips. I’ve been absorbing videos from The Tesla Plaid Channel on YouTube like a sponge to get me prepared for my first drag strip experience in my upcoming Plaid. He has decades of experience in drag racing and I’ve learned a lot from his channel.

Apparently the NHRA rules are changing for 2022 so that stock cars built after 2014 (I think that was the year) no longer need the roll cage or parachute when doing under 10 seconds and over 150MPH in the quarter so hopefully that will allow Plaid owners to go full out. You’ll still need the helmet and possibly a fire suit though, so check the rules page of your desired track’s website.

Also, here a few more tips I picked up from The Tesla Plaid Channel:
- Turn off your AC before arriving at the track. It can leave water on the track which can be dangerous for other drivers.
- Launch the car around when the last yellow bulb lights for a good reaction time (if you wait until it turns green, you’ll have a terrible reaction time). Andrew at the TPC mentioned above, seems to take off on the last yellow bulb and often gets sub 0.1 second reaction times.
- Be aware of the pro tree. Sometimes they’ll switch the Christmas tree to the pro tree setting which flashes the top lights, then quickly lights all of the lower lights and that’s when you launch (no progressive yellows to let you anticipate the timing).
 
Thanks for the tips. I’ve been absorbing videos from The Tesla Plaid Channel on YouTube like a sponge to get me prepared for my first drag strip experience in my upcoming Plaid. He has decades of experience in drag racing and I’ve learned a lot from his channel.

Apparently the NHRA rules are changing for 2022 so that stock cars built after 2014 (I think that was the year) no longer need the roll cage or parachute when doing under 10 seconds and over 150MPH in the quarter so hopefully that will allow Plaid owners to go full out. You’ll still need the helmet and possibly a fire suit though, so check the rules page of your desired track’s website.

Also, here a few more tips I picked up from The Tesla Plaid Channel:
- Turn off your AC before arriving at the track. It can leave water on the track which can be dangerous for other drivers.
- Launch the car around when the last yellow bulb lights for a good reaction time (if you wait until it turns green, you’ll have a terrible reaction time). Andrew at the TPC mentioned above, seems to take off on the last yellow bulb and often gets sub 0.1 second reaction times.
- Be aware of the pro tree. Sometimes they’ll switch the Christmas tree to the pro tree setting which flashes the top lights, then quickly lights all of the lower lights and that’s when you launch (no progressive yellows to let you anticipate the timing).
The Tesla Plaid Channel is marvelous, I also subscribe. I'm happy the NHRA changed the rules, although flat out the MS Plaid might hit 150 mph in the quarter mile. Reaction time really isn't a big deal. Your ET calculation begins when your car trips the sensor by moving, not when the green light comes on. And given the acceleration of the Plaid, most of the time you don't need to be obsessed with reaction time in order to cross the line first. And tracks should warn drivers if they switch to the pro tree. Have fun out there! :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: MrKool and kayak1

FlatSix911

Porsche 918 Hybrid
Jun 15, 2015
7,472
7,689
Silicon Valley
Went drag racing last night at Willow Springs. Got in 6 races. Whacked a couple Hellcat Chargers and a badass Camaro, among others. Somehow I got distracted during the amber light countdown against a silver Hellcat, so he got the jump. But I caught him within about a hundred feet. Game over. View attachment 794705
Love it... now, where do I get the hat?
 
  • Like
Reactions: MichaelP90DL
Went drag racing last night at Willow Springs. Got in 6 races. Whacked a couple Hellcat Chargers and a badass Camaro, among others. Somehow I got distracted during the amber light countdown against a silver Hellcat, so he got the jump. But I caught him within about a hundred feet. Game over. View attachment 794705
What was your best ET and trap speed? What SOC were you at?
 
What was your best ET and trap speed? What SOC were you at?
8.192 seconds against a yellow Camaro, 135.54 against another Plaid. Willow Springs is about 1,000 feet, not 1,320. State of charge, between 86% and 92%. My best time so far on this track (on another day) was 7.908.

I hired a guy to shoot video, plus I shot footage on my iPhone and GoPro. Am editing the video now, will post the link when it's finished.
 
Last edited:
For those who have not yet experienced what it’s like to be on a drag strip with your MS Plaid, this post is for you.

Most big US drag strips operate under rules of the National Hot Rod Association, which is fine unless you drive a really quick, unmodified (stock) electric car. The Plaid can scoot through the quarter mile in around 9.2 or 9.3 seconds. NHRA rules stipulate that a car that can do the quarter in under 10 seconds must have a roll cage, a parachute, the driver must wear a fire resistant suit, and also possess a special racing license. I think there are more restrictions, too.

A few years ago when Dodge released its one-year-only Demon with 840 horsepower, they claimed it was so quick it was “illegal” at NHRA tracks. Dodge marketed the car using a letter from the NHRA that said the car -- in stock form -- could not run on their tracks. Cool sales ploy, and the Demon did the quarter mile in the high 9-second range. Interestingly, I’ve heard nobody else has matched that time in that car in stock form, whatever that may mean. To run at an NHRA track in the 9s, the rules about the roll cage, parachute, etc., apply.

Some NHRA track managers have told Plaid drivers to hit the brakes at the 1,000-foot marker so as to not dip into the 9s, but what fun is that? If your unmodded Plaid does the quarter in under 10 seconds, you’ll be warned. Second violation, you're told to leave.

Now, I’ve been racing at Willow Springs International Raceway in Rosamond, CA, which is in the desert about an hour and a half north-northeast of Los Angeles. It’s not an NHRA track. And it’s about 1,040 feet long (quarter mile is 1,320 feet). It’s a run-what-you-brung place, which is great if you don’t want to deal with pro drag racing's bureaucracy. Thirty-five bucks gets you in the pits and to the starting line.

Willow Springs opened in 1953. It’s a road racing place. Drag racing occurs on the straight near the stands, usually at night. I’m of the opinion they ought to buy an adjoining parcel of desert land and make the strip a quarter mile with a big shutdown area, but whatever. You will need a racing helmet that meets certain specifications; check the race track’s website for their requirements. Then do a Google search for a helmet that meets those requirements. They are easy to find. Some tracks offer rental helmets.

There are things to sign which make you assume all the liability if bad stuff happens. After registration, you’re good to go. Your auto insurance will almost certainly not cover you at a race track (check your policy), but you can buy track day insurance online. Put the car in Drag Strip Mode to bring the battery to optimum temperature. When you get the red-orange indicator on the instrument panel, the car is ready. Put your suspension at the lowest level. It’s time to race. Drive to the entrance of the staging lane. An official may draw a number on your glass.

Cars will move forward as race officials direct them, in pairs, to move to the starting area. In the burnout box, ICE cars will often smoke their tires to clean off any debris and to warm up the rubber for improved traction. It’s an impressive display but it really is pointless for most when they’re up against a Tesla Plaid. All-wheel drive and traction control means you can’t smoke the tires, so don’t even try. Just gag on the smoke as you drive through it and roll unimpressively to the staging area and stop where the official tells you to.

After the cars ahead of you take off then clear the track, you will be signaled to move to the starting line. That thing between the lanes with the colored lights on it is called the Christmas tree. One set of lights is aimed at you, the other set at your opponent. There will be two staging lights at the top. Move forward slowly until the first light turns on. Then stop when the second light turns on.

Immediately put the car into cheetah stance; don’t wait. It takes several seconds to get ready. Left foot down on the brake very hard and hold. Right foot all the way down on the go-pedal and hold. When the official sees both cars are correctly in position, he will start the countdown. There will be four more lights turning on about a half second apart. The first three are amber so you get the rhythm. The fourth light is green. Anticipate when to release the brake. If you release too early you will see a red light, which means you screwed up and lost.

And here’s the fun part. It almost doesn’t matter what kind of car is in the other lane. No doubt you'll hear the roar of an engine before the green light. Chances are good it’ll be a Charger, Challenger, Camaro, Corvette, or a Mustang. ICE cars are at a big disadvantage compared to electric cars. Engines have a narrow torque band, which is why they have transmissions. The point of a transmission is to keep the engine in its torque band as the car accelerates. Your Plaid has no such issues. You have 100% torque from the instant you release the brake, and no time is lost to shifting gears.

And it's a massive amount of torque (1,050 lb.-ft.). Instant torque means you leap out front with no delay. For your opponent, the challenge is to catch you within several seconds, and good luck with that. Another advantage of that quick leap off the line is you may well be out of the way if the other guy blows up (shrapnel, oil), or crashes.

When the light turns green and you take your left foot off, you're slammed hard into the seat and whoever is in the other lane instantly disappears behind you. Poof, gone! The roaring engine sound fades. You'd think you’re all alone on the track, serenely accelerating, just racing against the clock, were it not for the receding headlights in the rear view. The steering gets light so stay alert. Focus, ignore that other car. That finish line is coming at you quickly. At Willow Springs, it’s marked by white cones. There is a device at the cones which will record your finish.

When you pass the finish line, you enter the shutdown area. Decelerate and be aware of the other car. Enter the return road. When you get back to the pit area, an official will hand you your time slip. It contains info for both cars, including driver reaction time, speed at the finish and the ET, or elapsed time. The lower the time, the better.

At Willow Springs, the shutdown area is very short. The instant I pass the finish line, I’m hard on the brakes. When racing at Willow at night, I’m usually off the accelerator or on the brakes before the finish. Darkness means I want a little more time to slow down. This shutdown area was probably not designed to accommodate very fast 4,800-lb. cars. At Willow, I can cover the more-or-less 1,040 feet in 7.9 seconds at 135 mph. That's a lot of energy to scrub off.

I recommend you research the track layout before racing, especially at Willow Springs since you’ll need to slow down so quickly.

Drag racers love quick cars. You’ll get some thumbs-up and probably some scowls. The word is out. The Model S Plaid is a ruthless predator. A lot of guys won’t want to race you. If they have a stock car, it’s a guaranteed loss. And there is a lot of video on YouTube of Plaids spanking heavily-modded cars, too. And while getting through a quarter mile in the 9s is really hard to engineer, some *dedicated* drag cars (dragsters, etc.) will spank you! You won’t win ‘em all, but in most cases you will lose only if you mess up.

The Model S Plaid isn’t really a race car. It’s just a nice, quiet family sedan.
🙂
Which happens to have long, thick, curved claws and razor-sharp teeth.
Correction to this article; Willow Springs' drag strip is 1,000 feet long, it was measured for track insurance purposes. However, the track has a slight upward incline, so ETs are going to suffer a little bit. Gravity is an enemy. :)
 

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