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Tire Life

XLR82XS

D M C
Jul 26, 2019
3,161
1,963
SWFL | Vegas
Weight's the ultimate killer in any car, except maybe luxury boats. If this thing was 700 lbs lighter, everything would be far less intensive. More range, faster acceleration, less wear & tear on everything. I'm looking forward to 50-pound batteries that can store 300 kWh.
Would be nice to have carbon composite or similar lightweight and strong material for battery cases that can provide impact protection. Maybe in another 10 years. ;)
 

StellarRat

Active Member
Jan 8, 2014
1,524
1,511
Pacific
While at the Sarasota SC having HW3 installed I was informed that my two rear tires needed replacement due to tread wear. My 2018 M3 has only 14,000 miles on the odometer. Have others had to replace their tires so early? Tesla tells me that my driving is probably too aggressive and that the same thing will happen again if I don't moderate my driving habits.
Unfortunately, this seems to be a common "problem". High weight and high torque seem to be the culprit. My friends M2 LR RWD had rear tires that were down to the cords in 18,000 miles. Even though the tires don't spin when you accelerate hard in an M3 it puts a ton of stress on the tread and more of it wears off than a slow take off consumes. You might consider driving more gently than the M3 wants you to.
 

Feathermerchan

Active Member
Sep 21, 2018
1,211
1,002
Euless, Tx
OP - Whaich Model 3 do you have and which tires?
I disagree that it is weight. Why? I have a F150 that weighs 6,000 lb empty. The first set of tires lasted over 50K. I expect to get more out of the Michelins that are on it now. I have the MXMVs on my 3 perf and from measurements by Discount Tire, expect 40K. Mostly fwy/Hwy but not necessarily easy driving. I do run 46 psi cold. What pressure do you guys run?
 

Dolemite

is my name
Sep 19, 2019
1,372
1,733
Seattle, WA
It's really simple.

Driving a high-performance 4,100 lbs car the way it's meant to be driven wears out every component far quicker than a 3,000 lbs car of equal performance. That's not a debate - it's physics.

With the TM3, it's especially easy to vaporize tires since it delivers massive torque from a standstill and makes no noise while doing it. So it's difficult to develop a "sensory" frame of reference. Look in your rearview mirror when taking off "normally" at a light & notice how far ahead you are of other cars. Make a few dozen such starts every day & you get the result we're trying to scientifically analyze itt.

Unless your alignment is messed up - then that's another story.
 

Rottenapplr

Active Member
Apr 6, 2019
1,015
537
LOS ANGELES
This is my tire measurements in MM not inches. I did a tire rotation at 10k mikes. I then missed a rotation and when I tried to rotate my car yesterday, the rear had more tires than the fronts so I decided to not rotate it. Check out the attached files.
 

Attachments

  • Tire measurements 3.23.2020.pdf
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Jedi2155

Model 3 has Arrived.
Jul 6, 2018
1,685
1,441
Upland, CA
For reference, my old manager's Audi S5 wore out his tires bald in 10,000 miles too. Its a combination of driving habits and Tesla's being a high performance heavy vehicle. Changing your driving habits or having a weaker vehicle would both improve tire life.

For reference my Michelin Pilot Sport 4S were still usable at 25,000 miles and probably had another 5,000+ miles of life left.
 

Rottenapplr

Active Member
Apr 6, 2019
1,015
537
LOS ANGELES
This is my tire measurements in MM not inches. I did a tire rotation at 10k mikes. I then missed a rotation and when I tried to rotate my car yesterday, the rear had more tires than the fronts so I decided to not rotate it. Check out the attached files.
Forgot to put the current tire measurements in the attachments were done yesterday at 22k miles. I think I have another 6 months of life left and will then look for another set of tires. Maybe summer tires since I drive my Prius in increment weather.
 

Needsdecaf

Active Member
Dec 16, 2018
1,278
1,899
The Woodlands, TX
My LRAWD had 37k highway miles (done in a little over 14 months) when it died. The 19" Pirellis had been rotated only once at 11k miles and they were all completely even, front to rear. They still had probably 1 or 2 /32 of life left. And I tend to replace my tires early.
 

Knightshade

Well-Known Member
Jul 31, 2017
13,673
23,265
NC
For reference, my old manager's Audi S5 wore out his tires bald in 10,000 miles too. Its a combination of driving habits and Tesla's being a high performance heavy vehicle. Changing your driving habits or having a weaker vehicle would both improve tire life..


AWD vs RWD makes some difference too....

My OEM Michelin all seasons on my RWD Lexus IS350 wore out in just under 20k miles....(as did the Michelin hi-po summers that kept going on every ~20k after).... in contrast my AWD Model 3s OEM Michelin all seasons look like they're gonna pretty easily go somewhere in the 25-30k range, despite being the same driver, and in a heavier car.
 

Mikeydeek

Member
May 8, 2018
144
49
Ottawa
Just got my winters taken off and my summers back on and the technician measured the treads.
I estimate I did about 8000km before changing them to winters.
Tread was 6mm (7.5/32)on back and 4mm (5/32) on front!!!
Seems like I have 5000-10000km left.
That seems like crazy wear to me. I don’t corner hard but probably floor it at stop lights a few times a day.
 

XLR82XS

D M C
Jul 26, 2019
3,161
1,963
SWFL | Vegas
Tread was 6mm (7.5/32)on back and 4mm (5/32) on front!!!
Seems like I have 5000-10000km left.
That seems like crazy wear to me. I don’t corner hard but probably floor it at stop lights a few times a day.
There's the accelerated wear cause: flooring it a lot. As others have stated, vehicle weight and high motor torque will shred tires quickly if you have a heavy right foot.
 

stoshiro

New Member
May 4, 2020
1
0
90740
Hi all - First post here.

I'm at just 7,000 miles and noticed my rear tires are just about bald. Front ones have probably 75% left.

I don't drive that aggressively, I can't believe how fast these wear.
 

MitchV

Member
Mar 3, 2020
9
17
USA
Yikes! I can only assume this will be true for the Cybertruck... but I imagine truck tires will be significantly more expensive.

I knew that Tesla's tended to chew through tires quickly, but I didn't realize they wore down this quickly.
 

rogernaples

Member
Jun 13, 2019
7
0
Florida
On my 2018 M3 I had to replace my rear tires at about 12,000 miles. I did this at the Tesla Service Center. The only recommendation they could give was to rotate my tires every 6 months. At the time my car was about 16 months old and I had never rotated.
 

CharleyBC

Active Member
Jun 28, 2019
1,491
1,723
Talent, OR
Hi all - First post here.

I'm at just 7,000 miles and noticed my rear tires are just about bald. Front ones have probably 75% left.

I don't drive that aggressively, I can't believe how fast these wear.
I think aggressiveness is pretty subjective.

At my first rotation visit around 6300 miles, the tech said, "you've been having too much fun with that acceleration, haven't you?" after noticing the rears were 1/32 more worn than the fronts. (RWD car.) So I backed off, and now save my NASA lift-off demos for first-time passengers. And so at 34,000 miles our original MXM4s are still hanging in there. I'll probably replace in the fall.
 

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