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Tire rotation with one new tire

Discussion in 'Model S: Interior & Exterior' started by jmsurpri, Apr 9, 2017.

  1. jmsurpri

    jmsurpri Member

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    I have 12k miles and haven't rotated tires yet. Waiting for my 1st year service to do the rotation. Unfortunately I got a nail in the driver side rear tire recently and got a new tire. I have no idea if I should rotate the tires now. I haven't measured tread depth on the existing tires but visually the rear tire is slightly lower than the fronts. Seems like I should keep the new tire in the rear. Should I just rotate the passenger side tires?
     
  2. animorph

    animorph Member

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    Sounds reasonable to me.
     
  3. Dborn

    Dborn Confirmed

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    Let Tesla measure your tread depth and advise.
     
  4. tnt1971

    tnt1971 Member

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    On most cars, the front driver's side wears the quickest. The reason is that that is usually the heaviest part of the car because the driver sits closest to it. I don't know if it is the same on the Tesla as it is not a typical car and much heavier overall. I would put the new tire there and get yourself a tread gauge. Keep it there as long as you can but rotate when there is a difference of 1mm from the inside to the outside of the tread of that tire. Assuming your tires are not unidirectional, keep the new one on the front as it gets the most wear and rotate it from the left to the right side.
     
  5. Dborn

    Dborn Confirmed

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    According to the service centre at my recent visit, the rear tyres on rear engine TESLA's wear the most due the squatting that occurs on launch especially the inner side. On ICE cars it is usually the front tyres. He was not sure about the dual motor though.
     
  6. jaguar36

    jaguar36 Active Member

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    You should put the new tire in the spot where it will wear the fastest.

    Which tire wears fastest depends on the type of car. Rear wheel drive cars tend to wear the back tires first, front wheel drive tend to wear the fronts first. AWD cars depend on where the car is sending most of the power. Audi's send most power to the front wheels and will therefore wear out the fronts first. AWD BMWs still wear their rears out first.

    If its a PXXD Tesla, it probably wears the rears first as they are likely launched hard and have the larger rear motor (although alot of them have staggered tires making the discussion moot). If its a XXD the fronts probably wear first, although it may depend on driving style. A non-D would wear the rears first although once again driving style could change that.

    The drivers side typically wears faster, due to the higher number of right hand turns than left hand turns (Think of all the highway on ramps).
     
  7. tnt1971

    tnt1971 Member

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    I always thought it was because of the additional weight (the driver is in the car by themselves most of the time). My last car was a Corvette with staggered wheels that were unidirectional. They could not be rotated without taking them off the rims. I wore out two sets of tires and the driver front always was the first to show cords, despite the rear wheel drive.
     
  8. Vern Padgett

    Vern Padgett Proud and Grinning Model S90D owners

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    Tesla will tell you to buy another new tire and have them both in the front or back (replace them in pairs).
     
  9. jmsurpri

    jmsurpri Member

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    Tesla service replaced the one tire. When I asked if they should be replaced in pairs they said it wasn't necessary. I have annual service next week so we'll see what they do.
     
  10. Vern Padgett

    Vern Padgett Proud and Grinning Model S90D owners

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    Sorry jmsurpri. Our body shop did that for us as well, but we only had 3000 miles on it. I thought that with 12,000 miles you'd not have a matching pair. In fact you said so in your post. Odd that Service set you up with a non-matching set, in my opinion. I guess I'm thinking that way because the manager of the body shop, Ted Sanders of Class Auto in Signal Hill, a Tesla-approved shop, said they had to be replaced in pairs. That was before he said that with only 3k miles they didn't need to be replaced as a paired set.
     
  11. jmsurpri

    jmsurpri Member

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    I was surprised as well and asked multiple people there at tesla service.
     
  12. JClu

    JClu Member

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    I had a very similar situation with a screw in a tire

    Have to replace a relatively new tire due to a nail

    Long story short, my local Tesla SC (Highland Park) replaced the punctured tire. I asked the service advisor whether I needed to replace more than the damaged tire (for balance etc, even though I've driven only about 9,000 miles with these tires), she said it was not necessary. Looking at the invoice, they measured the tread depth

    Tire Depth.PNG
    I have not rotated the tires yet. So with my driving habits (not very aggressive), my front tires are wearing out more than the rears (I have a 90D, or all-wheel-drive in the traditional sense).
     
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