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Trip Report - Washington to California

Hi all,
Just a quick report. We did our first long trip with the Model X Sunday and Monday. First leg was
as far as Eugene, Ore. and after a long night at the Holiday Inn Express in Springfield (good place
with breakfast and a supercharger in the lot) we made the second leg to Lincoln, Ca.
The car did very well - but I was a bit surprised how the long duration higher speeds consumed
the battery as much as they did. The car seemed to 'anticipate' that so we always arrived at a
charger with enough miles to 'search' for the charger. I just hadn't driven "at speed" for hours
and hours before so I didn't really understand how much faster the battery (miles) went down.
We learned to put the addy of the destination super charger into the GPS! One of the stops
I had just entered the name of the small city and it took us to downtown ... which wasn't any
where near the charger ... but we found it and all is well.
Have been learning how to turn the sun shade to a horizontal orientation and then position
it so it blocks the sun - nice trick and with the more than ample vertical clearance makes it
very effective sun blocking - it is rarely all the way to where it is locked in at the rear view.

The car had to deal with an idiot that cut in with far too little space in front of us. It was in
cruise control mode, the dumbey dodged in, the car went into hard braking, and he cleared
the front bumper by less than 6 feet. Some people's kids! I've never understood the drivers
that 'have' to try to make time when the traffic levels are high and they can't really make a
difference - I guess they "just have to try". It's usually a driver that I refer to as a "squid".
If you've ever seen a squid swimming in the ocean you know that they squirt, pause, and
squirt again ... just like the drivers trying to make time on a crowded multi-lane freeway.
Please note I said "the car had to deal with" and not "I" - the car responded before I did.

The location (spacing) of the superchargers along I-5 between Seattle and the S.F. Bay Area
is great! It would be nice if there were a better range of choices for places to get a meal - we
had to 'settle' for some places that we wouldn't normally go to and there don't seem to be
any superchargers near brew pubs. *G*

The Model X is simply the best car for long trips I've ever owned - in over 60 years of
driving. The comfort of the seats (without being so comfortable you are struggling to
stay awake) and the handling characteristics are simply great. This particular trip was a
route I've been driving since the 60's so I know it well.
We got to see some amazing sunsets coming down I-5. The mountains in the Siskiyous
are noticeably short on snow - hopefully they will "white up" thru the winter. Not much
wildlife or birds - not really expected when you are driving I-5. Roads were clear and
dry the whole way - not even any snow along side the road over Siskiyou Summit.

Thanks for reading ... Jim in the PNW
 
I have made many long distance trips in my 2018 MX, and usually at 85-90 on the highway. Yes, no or very little regen braking, plus the extra drag at speed, but still go 3-3 1/2 hours and up to 240 miles on a charge, again depending on actual average speed and highway traffic. Much less stress than my ICE. The car really helps with figuring out which Supercharger to stop at, and if I start on a leg and it says I will only be at 7% upon arrival, I don't slow down. I usually have a city or other slow down to go through that ends up getting me there a few % above the original predicition.

ENJOY!
 

DCGOO

Active Member
Supporting Member
Nov 24, 2015
2,934
2,042
Indianapolis, IN
Hi all,
Just a quick report. We did our first long trip with the Model X Sunday and Monday. First leg was
as far as Eugene, Ore. and after a long night at the Holiday Inn Express in Springfield (good place
with breakfast and a supercharger in the lot) we made the second leg to Lincoln, Ca.
The car did very well - but I was a bit surprised how the long duration higher speeds consumed
the battery as much as they did. The car seemed to 'anticipate' that so we always arrived at a
charger with enough miles to 'search' for the charger. I just hadn't driven "at speed" for hours
and hours before so I didn't really understand how much faster the battery (miles) went down.
We learned to put the addy of the destination super charger into the GPS! One of the stops
I had just entered the name of the small city and it took us to downtown ... which wasn't any
where near the charger ... but we found it and all is well.
There is a button directly on the map screen that searches for nearby Superchargers. After choosing one, NAV will take you directly there.
 
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There is a button directly on the map screen that searches for nearby Superchargers. After choosing one, NAV will take you directly there.
Hmm - didn't know about that button. A screen shot would be nice...
However I have been using the voice command 'show superchargers' to display all the nearby superchargers on the navigation screen (and how many stalls are currently available at each one). Came in super handy this Thanksgiving because superchargers were crazy busy (was hard to find empty stalls anywhere).
 
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DCGOO

Active Member
Supporting Member
Nov 24, 2015
2,934
2,042
Indianapolis, IN
Hmm - didn't know about that button. A screen shot would be nice...
However I have been using the voice command 'show superchargers' to display all the nearby superchargers on the navigation screen (and how many stalls are currently available at each one). Came in super handy this Thanksgiving because superchargers were crazy busy (was hard to find empty stalls anywhere).
It is also covered thoroughly in the owners manual, check the section "Maps and Navigation." A screen shot should not be necessary.
 
Hmm - didn't know about that button. A screen shot would be nice...
However I have been using the voice command 'show superchargers' to display all the nearby superchargers on the navigation screen (and how many stalls are currently available at each one). Came in super handy this Thanksgiving because superchargers were crazy busy (was hard to find empty stalls anywhere).
Click on the lighting icon on the map screen, it'll show nearby superchargers.
 
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OK, reverse leg is done. Car seemed to want to schedule more stops for charging on the
return - even though I had set the charging limit higher - as in 2 more stops between the
S.F. Bay Area and the PNW. Why?

Weather was colder and wetter on trip North - does it use weather as one of the
components of supercharger stops?
Car also seemed to want to 'protect' when crossing the Siskiyous. Does it consider
things like a winter mountain crossing as 'vulnerable' and want you to top off the
charge so that if you do get stuck it will have enough charge to cover that? Both
crossings were done on clear and dry road - but the trip North was the day after
and the day before storms where snow would be coming down - we 'dodged'
the weather ,,, on purpose/by design.

Does anyone have any formula/rule of thumb for the amount of mileage lost to
things like using heat (or air), headlights, security monitoring while driving, etc. ???

- Jim in the PNW
 

DCGOO

Active Member
Supporting Member
Nov 24, 2015
2,934
2,042
Indianapolis, IN
OK, reverse leg is done. Car seemed to want to schedule more stops for charging on the
return - even though I had set the charging limit higher - as in 2 more stops between the
S.F. Bay Area and the PNW. Why?

Weather was colder and wetter on trip North - does it use weather as one of the
components of supercharger stops?
Car also seemed to want to 'protect' when crossing the Siskiyous. Does it consider
things like a winter mountain crossing as 'vulnerable' and want you to top off the
charge so that if you do get stuck it will have enough charge to cover that? Both
crossings were done on clear and dry road - but the trip North was the day after
and the day before storms where snow would be coming down - we 'dodged'
the weather ,,, on purpose/by design.

Does anyone have any formula/rule of thumb for the amount of mileage lost to
things like using heat (or air), headlights, security monitoring while driving, etc. ???

- Jim in the PNW
Don’t give it too much credit, it is not THAT smart.It simply uses how much energy is in the “tank” and your energy consumption. Watch the WH/mile number in the energy display, and you will see the how fast your driving is eating into the battery. Weather is the biggest factor that is unknown (by the car).

When I am on a road trip, I just set the charge limit to 100%, and put enough charge in, to get to the next supercharger. The algorithm used by the car, attempts to minimize the number of charging stops. However this often produces total trip times that are extended. Tools such as A Better Route Planner, consider total trip time instead. The right answer, will probably be in between as influenced, by other factors also unknown to the car, such as the driver’s food and water supply
 
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DCGOO,
I saw a display last night that may imply that the car has more intelligence about weather
than we know. It warned me that the battery charge was low (I think, but can't say for
sure that the warning came when the charge display bar went from green to yellow).
The warning was a small window in the center display (2018 Model X). Included in that
warning message were words to the effect of "if the temp drops much lower it will
affect the distance remaining". So it -did- know that it was cold outside the car and
-may- have known that the temps were expected to plummet last night (Seattle area)?
When I got home the TV weather was warning about temp drop. Important part of
this is that I do not remember seeing that same "if it drops ..." message before -
including when driving thru the Siskiyou Mts. with temps in the 30's. Maybe a
coincidence - maybe not?
- Jim in PNW
 

DCGOO

Active Member
Supporting Member
Nov 24, 2015
2,934
2,042
Indianapolis, IN
DCGOO,
I saw a display last night that may imply that the car has more intelligence about weather
than we know. It warned me that the battery charge was low (I think, but can't say for
sure that the warning came when the charge display bar went from green to yellow).
The warning was a small window in the center display (2018 Model X). Included in that
warning message were words to the effect of "if the temp drops much lower it will
affect the distance remaining". So it -did- know that it was cold outside the car and
-may- have known that the temps were expected to plummet last night (Seattle area)?
When I got home the TV weather was warning about temp drop. Important part of
this is that I do not remember seeing that same "if it drops ..." message before -
including when driving thru the Siskiyou Mts. with temps in the 30's. Maybe a
coincidence - maybe not?
- Jim in PNW
Sure, the car knows exactly what the outside temperature is, because that can be measured. What it doesn’t know is the forecasted weather. The message is standard fare when it is cold, and state of charge is low. I see it frequently when on road trips this time of year. But that message does not require any degree of clairvoyance to reach that conclusion.

I am in the middle of a holiday trip. On one leg, starting out, the car predicted over 12% battery on arrival at the next supercharger. What the car did not know was the fact that I was encountering, a 30+ mph headwind. When I realized I was dealing with a weather problem that was unknown to the car, I actually drove with the Energy graph and the distance to the destination displayed on the main screen. I also could see (using the IC Energy Display) energy consumption was excessive, over 600 wh/mile. Definitely not good. But as long the predicted mileage, exceeded the remaining distance, I would make it. If the calculated range dropped below the remaining distance, I would have been forced to slow down. I arrived with 1% left. Somewhat tighter than I like. But I had a high degree of confidence of making it.

Remember, I was monitoring the calculated range in the energy display, and NOT the tank gauge with it’s made up and largely useless number.
 
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