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Tsportline 19 x 8.5 Wheels on the Y

Nakk

Member
Mar 13, 2020
330
458
Camas, Washington
I also got in touch with TSportline customer service this week to ask if their 19” 8.5”wide TSV’s would work on a MY. They simply said it wouldn’t fit. From photos I’ve seen posted online, the 8.5” TSV’s fit fine—and I’d prefer that width at the 35mm offset vs. the 9.5” wheels they offer at 35mm offset (which don’t match OEM specs). It would have the required load rating, clear calipers etc. The only reason I can come up with for why TSportline isn’t recommending this is they’ve misquoted the load rating but don’t want to admit it. Just a guess...
I just had my 19"x8.5" Tsportline Model 3 TSTs mounted on my PUP Y. They had the proper load rating stamped inside the rim, as specified on the order page. They fit just fine. I'm seeing about a 3% improvement in efficiency over the Martians with the same tires. (Tested under identical conditions on the same loop on the same road.) I'm now getting the same efficiency the stock 21s had. My guess is the TSVs will do even better in efficiency. I'm running Vredestein Quatrac Pro tires, 255/45-19. These are performance all season tires, and even though they do well compared to other performance tires when considering efficiency, I would think a low rolling resistance tire would do 5% or more better.
 

Digital Man

Member
Mar 25, 2021
12
2
California
I just had my 19"x8.5" Tsportline Model 3 TSTs mounted on my PUP Y. They had the proper load rating stamped inside the rim, as specified on the order page. They fit just fine. I'm seeing about a 3% improvement in efficiency over the Martians with the same tires. (Tested under identical conditions on the same loop on the same road.) I'm now getting the same efficiency the stock 21s had. My guess is the TSVs will do even better in efficiency. I'm running Vredestein Quatrac Pro tires, 255/45-19. These are performance all season tires, and even though they do well compared to other performance tires when considering efficiency, I would think a low rolling resistance tire would do 5% or more better.
Thanks for the heads up on the stamping of the load rating inside the rim. I was on the fence about going with the 19”-8.5” wide TSVs but your experience will likely help me take the plunge.
 

MODEL+

Vendor
Oct 21, 2020
833
688
Portland, OR

Martian Wheels​

Martian Wheels also needs no introduction around here. Their MW03 wheels are fully forged, so light weight and strong coming, yet coming in at a reasonable price point. A wide variety of sizes ranging from 18"-20" and widths from 7.5"-9.5 in multiple finishes.



Recently fully restocked, we have cataloged Martian Wheels neatly in our store for you to have a refined shopping experience.
Take advantage of our free shipping code "TMCMODELPLUS" that expires at the end of this month!

-Danny
Wanna relay this here as well. Martian MW03 wheels fully restocked and cataloged neatly in our store. All wheels are hub-centric and load rated for Model Y. Happy stimulus shopping!
 

RyFreddy

Member
Apr 8, 2021
86
122
MN
I just had my 19"x8.5" Tsportline Model 3 TSTs mounted on my PUP Y. They had the proper load rating stamped inside the rim, as specified on the order page. They fit just fine. I'm seeing about a 3% improvement in efficiency over the Martians with the same tires. (Tested under identical conditions on the same loop on the same road.) I'm now getting the same efficiency the stock 21s had. My guess is the TSVs will do even better in efficiency. I'm running Vredestein Quatrac Pro tires, 255/45-19. These are performance all season tires, and even though they do well compared to other performance tires when considering efficiency, I would think a low rolling resistance tire would do 5% or more better.
So are you saying the 19” Martians had worse efficiency than your stock 21’s?
 

Raghu B

New Member
Apr 24, 2021
1
10
Houston TX
Thanks to all for valued inputs here on TSVs and especially RoBoRat(excellent description on wheel fit dimensions) & Brinox().
TSportline TSV 19x8.5 with 35offset fits perfectly on LongRange Y. I have replaced Gemini's with TSV's and used same tire. Wheels are more beautiful than the pictures. More curb protection with slight tire bulge due to 1inch skinnier wheel and Factory 255/45/R19 fits perfectly and look good on TSVs.
 

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RyFreddy

Member
Apr 8, 2021
86
122
MN
Yes.
This seems odd, no? Tsportline 19x8.5 should be narrower and lighter than 21” Uberturbines. You’re saying that you’re getting the same efficiency with the Tsportline 19x8.5 as you would with the stock 21”? Unless I’m totally missing something (and apologies in advance if I am), this is going against much of what I’ve read on 19-20-21 wheel sizes/weights.
 

Digital Man

Member
Mar 25, 2021
12
2
California
I’ve read about range comparisons of wheels with and without aero caps and it can be significant. The aerodynamics of the TSV, Induction, and Uberturbines are likely the cause for efficiency gains which more than offset losses due to larger wheel diameters and widths.
 
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Nakk

Member
Mar 13, 2020
330
458
Camas, Washington
@RyFreddy , I think what my data shows is that the 21" Uberturbines are a very aerodynamic wheel. Plus, there's quite a bit of misinformation on the internet about the effect of wheel weight on range. You might see a small benefit around town with lighter wheels, but at freeway speeds weight has a negligible effect on range. Plus, don't forget the tires I went with are still sport tires. A tire geared more towards lower rolling resistance is going to help range. Generally, smaller wheels are going to be more efficient than larger wheels, due to a smooth tire surface being more aero than a wheel surface. But my data shows that going from a very aero wheel to a not so aero wheel is going to negate that benefit. My guess is going to a narrower tire should help as well, but I have not tested that yet. A narrower rim, like I have, seems to hurt efficiency unless paired with a narrower tire. That makes sense given Tesla's use of very wide rims.
 
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pt19713

Member
Feb 5, 2020
920
1,112
Delaware
Nice looking wheels, but 1600 pound load rating is insufficient for the Model Y. The 101 load rating on the 20" wheels is the lowest rating that currently exists on the Y, which is an 1819 pound load rating. I would think the minimum wheel load rating you'd want would be 900 kg. (1984 pounds.)
the Forgestars are 730 kg. The TST are 750 kg. Both are perfectly fine for those who aren't towing.
 

pt19713

Member
Feb 5, 2020
920
1,112
Delaware
I run 20x8.5 +35 on my Model Y with 255/40R20 tires. No issues so far.

Don't know much about technical stuff on how wheel width and offset affects handling/stability, so I am not going to offer my 2 cents bout that.

Had a conversation about TST 19s vs Stock 19s few months ago, and here was my opinion:

The Y is designed with 19x9.5 wheels +45 mm offset. Ideally, use that since Tesla engineered the Y with this set up.
Outside of these specs maybe affecting handling, suspension, etc - I can't tell if for good or bad way.

If you go with TSV 19x9.5 +35, see A.
If you go with TSV 19x8.5 +35, see C.

Just sub TST with TSV when looking at the diagram, same NNx8.5 +35 spec.

Basically the +35 offset on 8.5 width will get the edge of the rim/wheel almost the same place as 9.5 +45 (stock 19s).

I am actually looking into getting 19x8.5 +35 TSV for my Model Y as well.
View attachment 606079
For someone looking to get a summary of all that stuff above, 19x8.5" with +35mm offset will sit inward 2.7mm or 0.1" more than the stock setup 19x9.5 +45mm or 20x9.5 +45mm.

For the MYP, the front wheels will sit inward 7.7mm or 0.3" more than the stock setup 21x9.5 +40 offset, not shown in the above diagram.
 

Nakk

Member
Mar 13, 2020
330
458
Camas, Washington
the Forgestars are 730 kg. The TST are 750 kg. Both are perfectly fine for those who aren't towing.
No, the 18" TSTs are 750 Kg, the 19" TSTs are rated at 900 Kg. This is on the website and verified by the stampings on my 19" TSTs. No reputable tire shop will mount 750Kg rated wheels on the Model Y. If you want to run under rated wheels on your car that's your decision, but it's not "fine" to recommend such to others. The minimum rated tire load rating on the Y is 1819 pounds on the 20" tires, and comes with reduced tow capacity. Wheel load rating should at least match if not exceed tire load rating. Putting 750 Kg load rated wheels on a Model Y is irresponsible and unsafe; it is not "fine." Further, if you are involved in an accident your insurance company could decline coverage based on unsafe modifications to the car. This could have serious legal and financial repercussions for any tire shop negligent enough to mount said wheels, as well as for the owner of the car.
 

pt19713

Member
Feb 5, 2020
920
1,112
Delaware
No, the 18" TSTs are 750 Kg, the 19" TSTs are rated at 900 Kg. This is on the website and verified by the stampings on my 19" TSTs. No reputable tire shop will mount 750Kg rated wheels on the Model Y. If you want to run under rated wheels on your car that's your decision, but it's not "fine" to recommend such to others. The minimum rated tire load rating on the Y is 1819 pounds on the 20" tires, and comes with reduced tow capacity. Wheel load rating should at least match if not exceed tire load rating. Putting 750 Kg load rated wheels on a Model Y is irresponsible and unsafe; it is not "fine." Further, if you are involved in an accident your insurance company could decline coverage based on unsafe modifications to the car. This could have serious legal and financial repercussions for any tire shop negligent enough to mount said wheels, as well as for the owner of the car.
When I get home I'll post the backside of the wheel showing the 750 kg stamped on the spoke.

Before you go off on a rampage, do the math. There are only 3 scenarios where the 730 or 750 kg wheel load is insufficient. Two of the scenarios involve the tow hitch, the other scenario involves loading the sub-trunk to the max limit of 285 lbs plus loading the trunk and rear seats.

Edit: found a 3rd scenario, post updated.
 
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Nakk

Member
Mar 13, 2020
330
458
Camas, Washington
For someone looking to get a summary of all that stuff above, 19x8.5" with +35mm offset will sit inward 2.7mm or 0.1" more than the stock setup 19x9.5 +45mm or 20x9.5 +45mm.

For the MYP, the front wheels will sit inward 7.7mm or 0.3" more than the stock setup 21x9.5 +40 offset, not shown in the above diagram.

I think you mean to say the outside of the rim will sit 2.7mm inward. The rim itself will sit 10 mm outward of stock, as will the tire if the tire size remains unchanged.
 

Nakk

Member
Mar 13, 2020
330
458
Camas, Washington
When I get home I'll post the backside of the wheel showing the 750 kg stamped on the spoke.

Before you go off on a rampage, do the math. There are only 2 scenarios where the 730 or 750 kg wheel load is insufficient and both scenarios involve a tow hitch.
What size TST? If it's a 19" then Tsportline is lying in their advertising and has stamped some wheels wrong. This would be very serious, so I'm extremely interested in what you find. My 19"s are stamped 900 Kg; if yours are stamped 750 I'll be talking to Tsportline. If yours are 18", then that's what the website shows anyway.

As far as doing the math, yes I realize based on simple multiplication the numbers seem to work out for 750 KG wheels and tires. However, that's only half the equation. The minimum load rating from the factory must also be honored. You run the numbers to see if you need tires with a load rating in excess of factory minimums. (This often happens when towing very heavy loads. ) You don't get to go below factory minimum wheel & tire load ratings, you can only go up. Neither you nor I know why Tesla engineers specified the tire & wheels they did. If you're in an accident, my previous comments hold true.
 

pt19713

Member
Feb 5, 2020
920
1,112
Delaware
What size TST? If it's a 19" then Tsportline is lying in their advertising and has stamped some wheels wrong. This would be very serious, so I'm extremely interested in what you find. My 19"s are stamped 900 Kg; if yours are stamped 750 I'll be talking to Tsportline. If yours are 18", then that's what the website shows anyway.

As far as doing the math, yes I realize based on simple multiplication the numbers seem to work out for 750 KG wheels and tires. However, that's only half the equation. The minimum load rating from the factory must also be honored. You run the numbers to see if you need tires with a load rating in excess of factory minimums. (This often happens when towing very heavy loads. ) You don't get to go below factory minimum wheel & tire load ratings, you can only go up. Neither you nor I know why Tesla engineers specified the tire & wheels they did. If you're in an accident, my previous comments hold true.
19x8.5 +35 offset
 

pt19713

Member
Feb 5, 2020
920
1,112
Delaware
Here's the math.
I don't have a tow hitch nor do I plan on adding one. For my application, 900 kg is overkill. There isn't a scenario where I'll overload the rear axle since I don't plan on putting 285 pounds of dumb bells or anything that heavy in the sub-trunk and trunk simultaneously. All of my Asian family and friends are well under the weights listed below. I don't see my rear seat ever breaking 300 lbs, let alone 400.

1620406979565.png
 

pt19713

Member
Feb 5, 2020
920
1,112
Delaware
What size TST? If it's a 19" then Tsportline is lying in their advertising and has stamped some wheels wrong. This would be very serious, so I'm extremely interested in what you find. My 19"s are stamped 900 Kg; if yours are stamped 750 I'll be talking to Tsportline. If yours are 18", then that's what the website shows anyway.

As far as doing the math, yes I realize based on simple multiplication the numbers seem to work out for 750 KG wheels and tires. However, that's only half the equation. The minimum load rating from the factory must also be honored. You run the numbers to see if you need tires with a load rating in excess of factory minimums. (This often happens when towing very heavy loads. ) You don't get to go below factory minimum wheel & tire load ratings, you can only go up. Neither you nor I know why Tesla engineers specified the tire & wheels they did. If you're in an accident, my previous comments hold true.
Actually, I have a photo of the backside since I cleaned them yesterday. Not the greatest photo but it shows the 750 kg load rating and 19x8.5 size
1620409961091.png

1620410006226.png
 
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Exelion

Member
Feb 21, 2021
138
170
Los Angeles, CA
I’ve been looking at this chart a lot, and Something I don’t quite get:

where it says front seat, that’s just ONE seat, right? But there are TWO front seats, so would that be 700 for the two of them? Same for the rear, 400 for one seat, or two seats?

350 for two seats is easy to overweight. Two average 200lb people will go over that.

Also, the second row has spots for three people!

while i dont see overweighting the sub trunk (285 lbs really?) the seat situation looks like it can be more than what I want to believe in the chart.
 

pt19713

Member
Feb 5, 2020
920
1,112
Delaware
I’ve been looking at this chart a lot, and Something I don’t quite get:

where it says front seat, that’s just ONE seat, right? But there are TWO front seats, so would that be 700 for the two of them? Same for the rear, 400 for one seat, or two seats?

350 for two seats is easy to overweight. Two average 200lb people will go over that.

Also, the second row has spots for three people!

while i dont see overweighting the sub trunk (285 lbs really?) the seat situation looks like it can be more than what I want to believe in the chart.
The numbers are for combined. You can make a sheet and plug in your own figures. I just plugged in random numbers. I figured most families would have teenagers in the back. For those hauling bigger adults, plug in higher numbers. What you're doing with the math is determining the amount of weight over each axle to determine the wheel and tire load.

Edit: I forgot to mention. Based upon a wheel rated for 1650 lbs, you have about 1100 lbs that you can have in the front seats, and 1100 lbs distributed in the rear. It's unlikely the front will get overloaded. For the rear passengers, you could have three 300 lb adults and you're under the load limit of a wheel rate 750 kg/1650 lbs.
 
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