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Two Teslas in one garage

Discussion in 'Model 3' started by NoTDI, Jun 11, 2016.

  1. NoTDI

    NoTDI Member

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    I'm down perhaps for 2 M3s depending on price, standard and optional equipment. One for me and other for wifey. She is no frills type (no pano, no hifi, AP) and I'm the opposite! I have been thinking about a few things:
    1. Should I spend extra money on a larger battery for one car to enable easier long distance travel?
    2. Do I need to get dual chargers at all? If I get it, should I get dual chargers for one or both cars? I'm thinking I only need for one car so if there is a need for quick charge, at least one can be charged quickly.
    3. If I get both cars with dual chargers, should I have one or two HPWC?
    4. Buy or lease? What are advantages and disadvantages as they relate to EVs. Always wondered what happens to the federal tax credit with lease? Is it baked into the advertised lease price?

    Both our commutes are less than 70 miles per day round trip. I'm willing to spend but would like to be smart about it and I don't have unlimited budget! Thanks in advance for your input.
     
  2. gavine

    gavine Petrol Head turned EV Enthusiast

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    Tax credit is typically baked into the lease.
     
  3. cman8

    cman8 Member

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    IMHO the dual chargers arent very useful. I would just get it supercharger enabled. Most of the time when your charging at 40A (like at work or somewhere where your shopping) you will be there a bit and not necessarily needing the extra 20-30 miles per hour of charge. What ive come to realize is that when traveling you charge at superchargers and then stay somewhere a dual charger wouldnt be needed because your charging overnight. But again thats my opinion.

    As far as the bigger battery thats up to how often and how far you plan to travel. I like going on long road trips and for me the 85 battery was a must. if you only plan to go places close by with the occasional long distance road trip, I wouldnt spend so much on the battery. But it is nice to have one for trips as you mentioned yours could be a bigger battery and your wifes be a basic 3
     
  4. ecarfan

    ecarfan Well-Known Member

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    Based on your short commutes, I strongly recommend one car has the higher capacity battery option and the higher capacity AC charging option (we don't yet know exactly what they will be but I am certain there will be such options). That will be your long distance trip car. You are going to love driving a Tesla EV so much that you will start taking road trips that you would never have considered before!

    Given that your wife says she would be happy with a basic Model 3, sounds like yours is going to be the trip car. Then get on HPWC and put it on an 80A circuit for your car and install a 240V 40A NEMA 14-15 outlet to charge your wife's Model 3.
     
  5. Chopr147

    Chopr147 Active Member

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    2 EV's? Your brave :) I will have my wife's ICE to fall back on if needed for longer trips. Maybe after a year or so and I am comfortable using my M3, we may look into getting a second one. But as others here say getting one with a larger battery just sounds sensible
     
  6. ChadS

    ChadS Petroleum is for sissies

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    Many of us have been running two EV's since 2009 (some in CA, where cars were available earlier, longer than that). And two Teslas since 2012 (or earlier for the few that bought more than one Roadster).

    So, there is no bravery required - it is very easy to do. I'm with ecarfan - get one stripped, and one with all the range/charging/autopilot goodies you can. We take a lot more trips than we used to in gas cars, and they are more enjoyable.

    Leasing is good if you like to upgrade to more goodies. Currently Tesla lease rates aren't that good (that may change) though, even with the federal tax credit baked in, and if you buy you obviously have more flexibility.

    Back in 2012 twin chargers were essential. Now that there are many more Superchargers and the differential is 48-72 rather than 40-80, I am not so sure. It depends on where you live and what charging is available, but for more twin chargers are probably no longer necessary.

    In my garage I've got on HPWC and one 14-50 outlet. To tell the truth even that is overkill; for a long time at our old house we had a 14-50 and a 120V outlet, and that was really plenty. I don't see any need for two HPWCs.
     
  7. johnnyS

    johnnyS Member

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    In my 3 1/2 years of owning a model S, dual chargers would have helped me one time at one charger. It was in a small town in Colorado. In California the superchargers will meet most if not all of your road trip needs.
     
  8. linkster

    linkster Member

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    1. Yes, on your car. Not so much on wifey's no frills M3
    2. Maybe yes on your car as the extra 50% can be convenient but very rarely needed.
    3. (2) 14-50's will be way more than adequate.
    4. Dunno on your car. Probably buy the no frills M3.


    Have bulky WPWCs in different locations for guests, however, we charge on a 14-30 for 60K+ miles with 80 and 160-mile commutes.
     
  9. CmdrThor

    CmdrThor Member

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    1. Yes I would suggest a larger battery for one vehicle if you are going to take long distance trips. It will help you reach Superchargers more easily and you will have faster charge times at each stops. We have a 90D Model X and a LEAF. We plan on replacing the LEAF with the smallest battery Model 3 because we will go on trips in Model X.

    2. There probably won't be dual chargers in Model 3. The standard charger might be 48A and there *might* be an upgrade to 72A but there is no guarantee that it will be available. Wait until it is known what the charger options will be.

    3. I personally recommend a Wall Charger for each Tesla you have. You don't want to have to move the plug every night, it you forget you might not have enough charge for your destination. Plenty of people charge exclusively with their mobile connector on a NEMA 14-50 and that is fine but I prefer a permanent installation for my daily charging.

    The new wall connectors can also communicate with each other and balance charge rates to not exceed the capacity of a single breaker (up to 80A on a 100A breaker).

    4. If you want a new car every 3 years leasing will be less risky with technology changing so rapidly. If you plan on keeping the car longer buying should be less expensive. I would not recommend leasing and buying out the lease if the tax credit is still around because although you'll get credit for the tax credit in the way of lower lease payments, the buyout price will be higher by the amount of the tax credit.
     
  10. animorph

    animorph Member

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    My plan is a long distance MS or MX, a short distance M3, and two HPWC's linked on one 100A circuit. I may get the bigger charger for the long distance MS for better destination/emergency charging, but might wait until I need it. MS would be optioned up for travel comfort, M3 would probably be more basic, without supercharging or large battery.

    M3 is reserved, but I'm waiting for a full 360 degree camera AP before ordering the MS or MX. Might be two M3's if that takes too long.
     
  11. NoTDI

    NoTDI Member

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    Everyone thanks for all your input. Here is what I have decided based on what I know and have learned from you:
    Wife's car will be a basic car and I will purchase it. She puts about 8000 miles a year.
    My car will be the long distance car because I don't think a 215 mile range gives you enough flexibly specially if you have a heavy right foot! So my car will have larger battery, AP, any option package that would bring it to MS standard equipment level, pano, nicer seats, super charging, and maybe couple other options that would keep payment around $600/m. I will lease this car as I put 20000 a year and don't want to have a car with over 120000 miles when it is paid off.
    Doesn't sound like dual chargers are needed as I live in Southern California and super chargers are everywhere and will be even more of them. So I will only need two NEMA 14-50s. CmdrThor's suggestion on having a wall charger is something I hadn't thought about. Let me see if I understand the difference between the standard connector and the wall charger . With wall charger you pull in and grab the head from the wall and plug into the car. With the connector, I guess it is always in your car, you take it out and plug one end to the car and the other to the wall.
     
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  12. NoTDI

    NoTDI Member

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    I'm not the best one to ask but from what I have read, a NEMA 14-50 and HPWC if used at the same time would need 125-150A. Maybe you are using them at the same time.
     
  13. CmdrThor

    CmdrThor Member

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    It all comes down to will you ever need to plug into a 120v outlet, a dryer plug, a NEMA 14-50, etc while you are away from home. If you can absolutely say no you'll never need to do that, it will be cheaper to just use your mobile connector that came with the car to plug into a NEMA 14-50. You'll save about $600 per car. If you want to use your mobile connector daily and when you go on trips bring it with you, that's fine too. But what you don't want to do is have to pack and unpack your mobile connector every single day.

    The cost of putting in a NEMA 14-50 outlet vs wiring up a Wall Connector is not going to be very different. But the Wall Connector does cost $500-550+tax. What you gain in return though is no worries of a loose connection causing overheating and melting your mobile connector. This is very rare though, and Tesla probably will cover damages to any Tesla equipment if overheating were to occur. Additionally way back in 2013 Tesla amended the warranty of Model S to include any fire damage with the exception of arson (The Mission of Tesla). One would assume that would apply to Model 3 as well.

    Basically you need to decide whether you want to have your Mobile Connector in your car at all times. If the answer is yes, the obvious choice is to install a Wall Connector at home. If the answer is no and you want to save ~$600, just put a NEMA 14-50 in and charge your car with your Mobile Connector.

    The other argument for a Wall Connector is charging at >40 amps, but we will have to wait and see whether Model 3 has an onboard charger capable of >40 amps.
     
  14. Bruin1996

    Bruin1996 Member

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    I have a S 90D and plan to get a model 3 as a 2nd Tesla. Currently have w NEMA 14-50 plugs set up. I was planning to get a HPWC but the electrician installing the plugs told me he had seen reliability issues with the HPWCs in other houses. Also.. The amp load with HPWC would potentially overload my electric panel.
     
  15. proven

    proven Member

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    The HPWC really isn't necessary except for people who drive a lot every day and may need a quick recharge. Otherwise there really isn't a reason to charge faster at home. The S charges at 29 miles per hour on a 14-50 and the X charges at 25. Even if you drive 150 miles that's still only 5-6 hours. In 2 years we've never needed anything faster.

    Now you could get the higher power charger in the car for the rare occasion you find a destination charger that will charge you faster, but don't forget that it only affects AC power sources that have higher than 40 (now 48) amps. DC chargers like the CHAdeMO and Superchargers aren't affected by having dual/high power chargers in the car.
     
  16. JeffK

    JeffK Active Member

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    I think one important reason to have a HPWC would be if you tend to be rather forgetful. Let's say after traveling on the weekend you arrive home, unload the car, and it slips your mind to plug in the car. You wake up Monday morning and you have that oh crap moment because you don't have enough charge to get to work. If you had dual onboard chargers and a HPWC then you'd only have to wait a few minutes similar to if you had an ICE on empty and you had to go out of your way to a gas station.

    Sure you may not need an HPWC all the time, but when you need it, you need it.
     
  17. ccutrer

    ccutrer Member

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    A lot of responses to the wall connector question are focusing on how fast you do or don't need to charge. With two Teslas I highly recommend getting two wall connectors. The reason is that a few months back they introduced a new version that can communicate with each other. You're definitely not going to want to have a single charging point in your garage (either 14-50 or wall connector), and have to deal with switching vehicles when one is full. Depending on your house, you may or may not have enough available power to do two 50A circuits, only one. If that's the case, two wall connectors can automatically take that 50A and share it between two cars, allowing either charger to use the full amount if possible, or sharing evenly if both cars need a charge at the same time. If you have anywhere between 50A-90A of available power, it will most efficiently utilize it, charging up to 48A (or 72A if you get the higher amp charger in your car) on either one. If you have 100A+ available, then two 14-50s would work just fine. Oh, and if you have less than 50A available, the wall connector can safely distribute that to both cars at the correct level. You might have problems getting both cars fully charged each night though, sharing so little power.

    There are big long threads in both the Model X section and the general charging section (and probably Model S too) about the new wall connector. They describe in detail many different charging scenarios, and the capabilities of the new wall connectors.
     
  18. Jason S

    Jason S Model S Sig Perf (P85)

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    Just to toss another idea out there -- with the Model 3 being the 'basic' car for our household when it arrives, I don't plan to get anything extra since already have a HPWC. My situation might be a bit special -- I have 2 superchargers near me and 1 near my work, so even emergency charging our existing Model S is an option if it is a bit short for whatever unlikely reason. The expected range and usage of the Model 3 means we really only need to charge it once a week, and very similar for the Model S. The Model S just ends up being the longer distance car.

    I basically plan to use the HPWC for both cars. Maybe just get into habit of swapping every other day. Maybe something else. Not really worrying about it.
     
  19. chipmunk

    chipmunk Member

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    We have two Teslas, and we easily get by with one 24 Amp charger (on a 30A dryer outlet) and a second on a standard household 110V outlet. For the unusual time when that isn't sufficient, I have a Supercharger 10 miles away that fills the gap. My recommendation is to get two of the new HPWCs that can share a single circuit, and skip the dual chargers. The key is to think about how many times you drive both cars 200 miles two consecutive days when you couldn't have stopped by Supercharger on your route. If that happens a lot, then you need two 50 Amp circuits which will be sufficient to charge both cars fully overnight.
     

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