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UK Cables, Plugs and Supercharging

Discussion in 'The UK and Ireland' started by mottster, Nov 5, 2015.

  1. mottster

    mottster New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2015
    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    Colchester, Essex, England
    Hello, I'm new here, just sent off my details to a leasing company to get my order underway, and wanted to check a few things re charging, and thought you guys might be able to help.

    I see form the Tesla support page (http://www.teslamotors.com/en_GB/models-charging/#outlet) that is says "Two outlet adapters are included: one for a standard domestic outlet and a second adapter for a utility outlet.". Does standard domestic outlet just refer to a normal plug? So for example if I'm visiting a friend for the weekend and they don't have anything other than normal plug sockets, I can still charge while I'm there?



    And the other adapter for a utility outlet, is that a Red, a Blue or a Type 2 adapter?



    And my last question (for now, I'm sure I'll have more!), I see on that same page "All Model S vehicles with the 85 kWh battery can use Superchargers as can properly equipped 70 kWh battery vehicles". Does anyone know what they mean by "properly equipped'? I see on this page - http://www.teslamotors.com/en_GB/supercharger - that it says "Every new Model S includes Supercharging". So I guess my question really is "can a 70 kWh single motor Model S use a Supercharger, and what rate does it charge at? There is also mention of Dual Chargers, which I can't work out a) how to add that to my car when configuring it on the Tesla site or b) whether that affects the charge rate I can get from a Supercharger.


    Thanks

    Mottster
     
  2. robin_

    robin_ Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2014
    Messages:
    30
    Location:
    UK
    Domestic outlet means a normal plug, yes. It will work but will be very slow (think a whole weekend to charge from flat).

    The utility outlet means either a 32A single phase commando outlet (using a blue plug adaptor) or a 16A three phase commando outlet (using a red plug adaptor).

    Type 2 is what you need to use most public charging points and to use most home EV charging points.

    I think there used to be 70kWh model that did not include supercharging access as standard but this isn't the case for new cars.

    I think dual chargers can only be fitted by the showroom now; not by the factory. It doesn't affect your supercharging rate at all (which uses external chargers effectively). It just means you can charge at a max of 22kW (using a 32A three phase supply on a Type 2 cable) instead of the normal 11kW.
     
  3. arg

    arg Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2012
    Messages:
    740
    Location:
    Cambridge, UK
    Dual/single chargers don't affect the charge rate at Superchargers, but the 70-battery cars charge slower than 85- and 90- batteries. Supercharger charging rates vary due to a lot of factors, but in general the 70 will be about 70/90 = 78% of whatever rate you would have got under the same circumstances in a 90.


    Completely true, but don't knock it - charging overnight from a 13A plug can often get that moderate amount of extra charge that means you don't need to stop elsewhere on the way home.
     
  4. robin_

    robin_ Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2014
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    30
    Location:
    UK
    Absolutely. I've ended up using the 13A charger way more than I thought I would, for exactly the reason you state. I just wouldn't want to use it as my primary charging source!
     
  5. Derosa

    Derosa New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2015
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    4
    Location:
    UK
    Just worth mentioning that the Tesla installation subsidy doesn't cover a Type 2 home charging point, only Blue Commando. The OLEV subsidy covers only Type 2.
     
  6. WannabeOwner

    WannabeOwner Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2015
    Messages:
    701
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    #6 WannabeOwner, Nov 6, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 13, 2016
    I'm not an owner yet, but from helpful discussions with existing owners in the UK I have taken the view to also get a CHAdeMO adaptor, and register for Ecotricity (and maybe others) to give me more charging options than just Superchargers and 13AMP home/friend/family locations.

    However, until Googling it, I had no idea how big the CHAdeMO adaptor is. It also looks quite "hefty" when attaching, e.g. for my wife to do. Best thing I found was Bjørn Nyland's video about CHAdeMO:



    Tesla CHAdeMO adapter (EU) review - YouTube

    I find that Bjørn's videos have an excellent level of detail, and his diction is plenty clear enough that I can watch them at 1.5x - which gets them down to an acceptable time spent : benefit received ratio - for me :)
     
  7. martinwinlow

    martinwinlow Member

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    Jun 18, 2012
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    Location:
    Herts, UK
    robin_: "I just wouldn't want to use it as my primary charging source!"
    Why not? Sure you can opt for a government funded 16/32A EVSE but when you consider 95% of cars only do 30 miles a day (don't know about Teslas, specifically - be interesting to know!), using a 13A (actually limited to 10A) is a perfectly acceptable way of charging day-to-day. I know because that's what I do! Wouldn't we rather have HMG spend this money on improving the rapid charging infrastructure? If you can afford a Tesla, you can afford to have your own EVSE installed if you really need one. They only cost a few hundred pounds nowadays. MW
     
  8. gdavison

    gdavison Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2014
    Messages:
    84
    Location:
    Hampshire / Berkshire Border
    Best advice I ever received on the CHAdeMO adaptor was "unless you have 3 hands, plug it into the car first, then play around with the stupidly large CHAdeMP socket/plug"
     

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